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I'm just wondering if I should have any concerns about DD playing in the sand at my local playground.<br><br>
She has a sandbox at home, but we've not yet filled it...I'm working on finding "safe" sand.<br><br>
Any comments?
 

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NaturalMamma, I just came here to post the exact same question. (Sorry I can't help answer it yet!) We just "inherited" a sandbox and sand from a friend who is moving.<br><br>
The sand is super-fine, it's dry and powdery. I've read about concerns re: silicosis (sp?) - sand contains a lot of silica, the same thing miners get when breathing in that rock dust all day long.<br><br>
I don't want to be too paranoid, but 30 minutes a day x 365 x 10 years - that's a LOT of sand in the lungs.<br><br>
Anyway, I will do some digging on CHEC and other environmental health websites and see if I can find anything.
 

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OK, here's what I found so far...<br><br>
1.) Most playground sand sold commercially comes from crushed rock from quarries, and therefore contains asbestos.<br><br>
2.) Recent news articles have also raised concern over the silica in sand, and its link to cancer (everyone knows inhaling silica over time causes silicosis.. a miner's lung disease).<br><br><a href="http://www.newsnet5.com/connectingwithkids/2353359/detail.html" target="_blank">http://www.newsnet5.com/connectingwi...59/detail.html</a><br><br>
3.) To protect your child's health, their playground sand should be natural sand (sand that comes from a beach). Natural beach sand does not contain asbestos dust.<br><br>
4.) Sand should not be powder fine, indicating that it has been crushed. It should be "washed" to eliminate tiny dust particles, before use on a playground or sandbox. Of course, all sand contains some silica - you can't eliminate silica so anything claiming to be silica-free is probably just a marketing ploy. But avoiding fine dusty sand, and ensuring that it is beach sand and washed first will reduce risk.<br><br>
From CHEC's website:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">While some sand for sandboxes is taken from the beach and is perfectly harmless, other sand comes from quarries and consists of crushed quarry rock. Unfortunately, some of this rock comes from quarries that contain asbestos, and the crushing of the rock liberates the asbestos. For years, manufacturers of toy sand have successfully lobbied the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the agency that is supposed to be watching out for children's health. They have persuaded the CPSC not to require labeling of sand to indicate its source. As a result, consumers are unable to tell by looking at the sand whether or not it contains asbestos. My advice is that you not<br>
purchase sand for a sandbox unless the manufacturer can assure you that it consists of beach sand and that it is not quarry rock.</td>
</tr></table></div>
National Health and Safety Performance Standards for Sanboxes and Sand Play Areas:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">1) Sand play areas must be distinct from landings areas for any equipment such as slides, swings, etc.<br>
2) All sandboxes shall be kept covered when not under adult surveillance. This covering shall be secured to prevent entry by children or animals, and sufficient to prevent contamination by solids or liquids.<br>
3) Sandboxes shall be equipped with constant and<br>
effective drainage systems and be constructed to present no safety hazards.<br>
4) Sand shall not be of the compacting type and should be replaced by fine pea gravel that is smooth surfaced. Any media placed in sandboxes shall present no preventable health or safety hazards by its nature or structure.<br>
5) Sterilized sand or pea gravel should be obtained for sandbox use.<br>
6) Sand that becomes contaminated shall be replaced with sterilized sand or pea gravel or the contaminant removed, where it is possible, to capture and dispose of all the contaminant. Treatment of sand with chemicals to attempt to sterilize it within the sandbox is not recommended.<br>
7) Sandboxes/sand play areas shall be inspected for signs of contamination and safety hazards before each use.<br>
8) Sand in boxes and play areas shall be replaced as needed and at least every two years.</td>
</tr></table></div>
I found this link to "Safe Sand" available online - this website has lots of EPA, OSHA, etc. info on sand safety, and they also sell safe sand online (free shipping at least, though the stuff's not cheap). There are likely many other brands, and I think Toys R Us sells safe sand too.<br><br><a href="http://www.safesand.com" target="_blank">www.safesand.com</a><br><br>
HTH.
 

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Wow, I had no idea this was even an issue. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yikes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="EEK!"> Thanks for doing all that research, TwinMommy - I've been thinking about getting a sandbox (with a cover to keep the neighborhood cats out). Let me know if you find a local source for safe sand!
 
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