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Some friends of ours have a 3-week old baby girl -- they're is working really hard to make breastfeeing happen and are doing a great job despite some significant baby blues and a nasty bout of mastitis (and subsequent yeast infection).<br><br>
We all know how hard it is -- mom is feeling awful, baby is feeding around the clock, and the it seems like the world is going to end if we don't get a few hours of sleep.<br><br>
Dad just called and said they were considering giving the baby a bottle of formula for one feeding tonight, just so mom could get a bit of rest -- he wanted to know what I thought. Of course, I told him that it wasn't something I would do and gave him all the standard reasons. While I totally believe in EBF whenever possible, I can't say that I didn't sympathize with their plight!!<br><br>
How do you all respond to these situations?
 

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Can you go over their place and help for a couple hours so she can get some sleep?<br>
(or if you can't, can someone else?) the problem with supplementing (other than nipple confusion and the typical reasons) is that the parents WILL get more sleep so they may end up liking it and quitting bf because with formula the baby will sleep more.<br>
at least this is my opinion... hopefully it works out for them... it's hard at first but SO worth it!
 

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The problem with this kind of thinking is that in fact, the formula will *not* make the baby sleep any better if the baby is not ready to do so. A friend of mine FFed both her babies due to hypoplasia, and she often says she *wished* that the myth about formula making them sleep better was true. As it was, she had to go through both not being able to BF them, AND not having them sleep very well for months. All those night-wakings and each one required her to make another bottle. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
I can definitely sympathize with them, the first weeks for us were incredibly rough, with mastitis due to poor initial latch, then the yeast infections, on top of which I was recovering from a c/s and a fall downstairs right after returning home... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/mecry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="crying"> I also had an oversupply issue so I would pump before a feeding so that he could latch and sometimes afterwards as well. I managed to save about 50 oz. of BM in my freezer during the first 3 weeks home.<br><br>
Sometime around the 4-week mark, my husband made the offer to let me get some sleep and he thawed a bottle of EBM. We had just introduced the bottle at one month, so there wasn't the danger of nipple confusion. He sent me off to bed and they stayed downstairs (hubby on the couch, baby in his little car seat nest). I got some time in bed totally to myself, and he kept the baby close to him for the first waking/feeding. Then when the baby woke again, he would bring the baby to bed for me. This helped me so much during that trying time when so many moms quit -- I got 4-5 hours by myself in bed, which was so nice when I was totally touched out.<br><br>
Around this time too, I got the hang of nursing lying down, which is like the best invention ever! I don't know if your friend will go for it, but once I got over my initial fear of having the baby in bed with me, I got so much more sleep when I could nurse him and just doze back off again.<br><br>
I would sincerely discourage them from introducing formula if the baby is doing well on breastmilk alone, because there's no telling how the baby will react to the foreign substance. They may find that they're awake MORE often if the formula disagrees with the baby. There's nothing worse than a baby who's spitting up or has a tummyache and is inconsolable... at 3 AM....
 

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naking...<br><br>
simple- there are a million other ways for dad (and others) to help. he does the cooking, cleaning, laundry, diapers, etc that are keeping mom from sleeping when the baby sleeps. you can teach mom to nurse lying down and she should be sleeping everytime the baby does.<br><br>
it is an uphill battle, but she should be getting plent of rest that way. it won't be the 8-9 hrs straight that she is accustomed to, however, she won't be getting that anymore, anyway, so why get your body to expect that? imo, the early weeks of sleep deprivation "prime" your body for what's ahead.<br><br>
oh and if they feel they HAVE to supplement, then mom should pump before bed and the baby should be fed ebm.
 
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