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I got home this evening and walking into Roey's (3.5 yr old) room. I noticed the Hyland's teething tablets box open on her floor, the pink tamper proof plastic on her bed and no bottle of tablets. It;s not like she opened hte bottle and had a few. She had to get the UNOPENED box out of the bathroom, take it into her room, open the box, take off hte pink plastic thingy, and unscrew the lid.

I know that she has eaten the whole bottle (she's done it two other times) but I want to see what she says. So I call her down to her room. I show her what is in my hand and ask her where the bottle is. She says, "Oh put it in with my undewear." She hid it under them.
I ask her what she did with the tablets and she said she ate all of them. No remorse or guilt. And yesterday, she drank some gentle tummy medicine that I had on the counter. We have had the poison talk, I have things labled with Mr. Yuk.

What should I do? I told her I had to talk to her dad first.

1) I NEED to put the medicine in a high place. Although they are all natural, she does not need to be tempted.

2) I had just bought the new box. It cost $5.

3) This not the first time she has done this. We talk about the dangers of taking medicine, how she is taking something away from Vivi that needs the tablets and trust.

4) Right now, she has to be with a grown up and not be herself because we can not trust her choices. She does not like this.

I know this post sounds like I am a neglectful mother (and i am) but what else shoudl I do?
 

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Your not a neglectful mother these things do happen.
Your answer as simple and as vague as it may sound basically lies here..

Quote:
1) I NEED to put the medicine in a high place. Although they are all natural, she does not need to be tempted.
If needed in a locked place a container her litle hands can't maunplate open. When it coems down to it shes is still 3.5 years and while yes she can obey and listen ect she is also still learning impluse controll and shes honestly does not get the idea of posion and this being harmful after all you give it out to cure her or her siblings...

The $5 is annoyig but chalk it up to realizing it needs to be moved higher now there could be a kinda natural/logical conquence here. If this meant you having to g out NOW and buy another $5 bottle when that was not planned then it could be that that money might have to say come ut of a movie night or a planned trip to get icecream ect I wuldn't rub it in like well now No movie! but sometimes reality is medicine comes first....

Quote:
4) Right now, she has to be with a grown up and not be herself because we can not trust her choices. She does not like this.
And if its needed to protect her she can have her big feelings you still need to protect her.


Deanna
 

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Well, you've missed one quick way to handle this. You failed to freak out about how you NEVER ever EVER EVER take medicine without an adult. And calling poison control and being so very relieved when you luckily don't have to take her to the hospital to have her stomach pumped and thank goodness she doesn't need to have special medicine for her to throw up all the extra medicine she took.

I just decided against getting gummy vitamins because Lina really doesn't get the concept of "just one" and I didn't want to deal with tantrums over what she'd perceive as "candy".
 

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I don't think the real problem is as big as you're making it out to be. She is still ONLY 3yo. Put the medicine up and make it so it is not her responsibility to keep herself safe. It doesn't matter how many talks you have with her or what words you say. It is not her responsibility at age 3 to remember the rules about poison. If you keep the medicine up, it is a non-issue. It seems to me that you are the one that needs to remember the rules about being responsible with medicine. And I'm totally not saying that to be snarky, but if you can't remember to keep the medicine off the counter, how can you expect a 3yo to remember not to drink it?

I think it's great you're having the talks with her about safety, and I think it's AWESOME that she told you the truth about what she did with the medicine. Even without the remorse/guilt, it's great that she didn't lie about it.
 

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Originally Posted by sapphire_chan View Post
Well, you've missed one quick way to handle this. You failed to freak out about how you NEVER ever EVER EVER take medicine without an adult. And calling poison control and being so very relieved when you luckily don't have to take her to the hospital to have her stomach pumped and thank goodness she doesn't need to have special medicine for her to throw up all the extra medicine she took.

I just decided against getting gummy vitamins because Lina really doesn't get the concept of "just one" and I didn't want to deal with tantrums over what she'd perceive as "candy".
Daddy took care of that one. He gave that talk (she kinda understood but not really)

Yes, I know I have to be the responsible one. Point taken
 

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I would put them up high inside a childproof medicine box of some sort. (Here's one, but if she's got enough dexterity to open the hylands teething tablets, she might be able to get this open. I'd strongly consider a locking box.)
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by sapphire_chan View Post
Well, you've missed one quick way to handle this. You failed to freak out about how you NEVER ever EVER EVER take medicine without an adult. And calling poison control and being so very relieved when you luckily don't have to take her to the hospital to have her stomach pumped and thank goodness she doesn't need to have special medicine for her to throw up all the extra medicine she took.

I just decided against getting gummy vitamins because Lina really doesn't get the concept of "just one" and I didn't want to deal with tantrums over what she'd perceive as "candy".
Be careful here...this backfired majorly for us. It made the kids better at hiding the evidence when they DID do things that were dangerous and wrong...such as taking matches and lighting them in the basement. You want her to not be afraid of telling you honestly that she ate all those pills. Imagine if it WAS a bottle of dangerous medication and instead of admitting it and leaving the evidence in plain view, she instead buried all trace of it under other garbage in the can and denied knowing anything three days later when you realised a pill bottle was missing.


Try to keep the freak out centered around being scared that she might have been hurt and how dangerous pills are...if she doesn't really understand the danger but still wants the pills she might just hide it better next time if she thinks she's just being punished for a bad behavior. The best way to avoid punishment is to be better at getting away with it. ITA that keeping the pills completely out of reach is probably the number one best thing you can do though.

Try not to feel too bad OP. I thought her reaction to being asked about the pills was a good thing and shows she doesn't fear talking to you about things.


(edited to add: Also, if she is one of the "proud to be a big sibling" types, you might stress that the baby really needs this medicine and if she eats it all then the baby won't have it...though this might be the wrong approach depending on her personality)
 

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I have to take thyroxine every day. If DD took it she'd definitely need hospital treatment, possibly very unpleasant treatment.

My medicine, and in fact, all the other medicine, since we have somewhere for it, is in a locked cabinet in the bathroom. I only ever take out one pill at a time, so the most she could take would be one (if something happened, which is very unlikely) which minimises the chance of harm.

Even the syrup of figs is in there - if she drank half the bottle it would give her diahorrea, but it's otherwise harmless. BUT i think right now i am trying to teach her to respect medicine, so even if something is actually "harmless" if it comes into the category of "medicine" it's locked up. I have shown her (under supervision) the inside of the cupboard and she's never shown any determination to get into it, so hopefully the attraction of mystery is not there. But i do tell her "we keep all our medicines locked up here to keep everyone safe, because taking it accidentally could make us really really ill" as i lock the box. On one occasion i left my bag hanging low down the day i'd picked up my script and DD, then just turned 3, came and said "mama, your jaggy pills are in your bag, you need to lock them up safe!" and we did. She even gets that her jelly vitamin is ONE a day, or it can give you a sore tummy. I actually think in some ways having strong medication in the house has benefited her in this regard.

Don't beat yourself (or her - not literally!) up about it, these things happen, no harm done. Some sort of locked cabinet can be gotten or made to prevent it happening and save you all those $5.
 

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I am never laid back about meds....."all natural" or not.

Tyr has been told from day 1 that only mommy or daddy give him medicine and he is to never, ever take any medicine without us. Same thing goes....if he finds a candy on the floor (m&m, smartie) he is to show us firts-just in case. He is very good at this.
He knows medicine is not candy...

Fortunately what she took did not make her sick but I want to remind you that "all natural" does not equal safe to eat....so personally I would not take this lightly...a bottle of fruit juice all natural vitamins can very seriously harm a child (even fatal)

So I think that if she is not going to learn these things then it is up to you as parents to take another step in locking up the medicine...make in inaccessible.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Kreeblim View Post
Imagine if it WAS a bottle of dangerous medication and instead of admitting it and leaving the evidence in plain view, she instead buried all trace of it under other garbage in the can and denied knowing anything three days later when you realised a pill bottle was missing.


Try to keep the freak out centered around being scared that she might have been hurt and how dangerous pills are...
: Yes definitely, that's exactly what I meant by freaking out. Not getting mad at her, but letting her see how scared you were that she could have been hurt.
 

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I would make sure that all meds/supplements are kept in a place your child cannot reach. My son is 5 and I still keep all cleaning supplies/meds, etc. up very high in a locked closet. When I was growing up both of my brothers overdosed and had to have their stomachs pumped. It was horrible.

I think talking with your lil one is great and all but at such a young age she cannot control herself enough with regard to meds, etc.
 

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I think talking to her about it, and consistently reminding her any time you're giving her medicines that medicines are something she should only have when her parents say so, are important. But at 3, she's too young to be expected to control her impulses in a situation that is so potentially dangerous. I keep everything-- even fairly innocuous things like non-flouride toothpaste-- shut up in a locked closet, on a high shelf. A cabinet that needs a key to open is best. The potential consequences of forgetting to shut up medications each and every single time are just too scary to think about.
 

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I had the same issue when DS was a toddler, I invested in a cheap tackle box and a lock.... problem solved. Unless of course you forget the key or the combination
 

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A three year old is too young to be able to use discipline to prevent them from something like that. At that age, their impulse control is almost non-existent, and they are unable to truly understand danger. This is why people "childproof" their homes.

PUT THE MEDS UP IN A VERY VERY HIGH PLACE OR GET A LOCKBOX FOR THEM.

Seriously, take it from me. DH was watching the kids once when I was away, and he came into the bedroom to check on our 3yo (she'd been out of his sight for less than five minutes). Turns out, she'd climbed from the toilet to the bathroom counter to reach the medicine, which was in a large linen/storage closet that's also in the bathroom.

She'd eaten several of my medications, psych meds that could have killed her. If DH hadn't checked on her right then, if the ambulance had been a few minutes later...I shudder to even think of it. And what's crazy is I HAD the meds very high up, but I didn't realize she could climb to reach the shelf. It was a pretty traumatic experience from what DH and DD have told me, charcoal down her nose, the works
So yeah. Keep your meds in a place your kids cannot get to.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Talula Fairie View Post
PUT THE MEDS UP IN A VERY VERY HIGH PLACE OR GET A LOCKBOX FOR THEM.
Worth repeating. If your daughter has already done this three separate times I believe a lock box may be your only option to keep her safe from overdosing on medications found in your home.
 

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Medication should never be a discipline issue with small children. I cannot stress this enough.

All medication should be kept in a locked inaccessible area until children are much older than three--I would not leave anything out where a three year old could get it, even Hylands.

Think about it: You can SAY medication is dangerous, but if you give it to her when she is sick so that she feels better...that sends the message "medicine makes me feel good!". She is too young to reconcile the difference, all she knows is that medicine makes her feel better. End of story, for a three year old. She will continue to get into the medicine because she can't reconcile two totally different concepts. Either it is good or it is bad, and from experience, she KNOWS it is good. So leaving medicine where a three year old can find it, and expecting her not to find it, is like letting her see you put lollipops on a high shelf, and expecting her not to search for them. It doesn't make sense.
 
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