Mothering Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi ladies<br><br>
a good friend of mine has 2 kids that were taken out of public school in september..she's getting discouraged and thinking of sending them back...<br><br>
I'm more into the unschooling stuff, teaching them without them thinking it's learning, having them follow their interests and going fromthere etc...<br><br>
the thing is, i totally dont see them thriving in the school environment...especially the younger one..she's 7 and has TONS Of energy..she's sooo smart, doesnt like sitting down though and doing worksheets etc..which is *totally* understandable...<br>
she LOVES and is sooo good a video games and loves to draw/make things and is creative like her mom...<br>
how can we redirect that energy into things like math/science etc.<br><br>
i had some ideas like making a 'go fish' or 'concentration' card game to teach the alphabet (i do this with my dd), or having them do a 'project' on something they are interested in--ie. taking them to the library to find books on the subject, learning how to surf the net to find info etc...<br><br>
what are some ideas to get them into it?<br>
any help would be appreciated<br>
thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,758 Posts
I find if I'm enthusiastic..so are the kids. If they see me loving to learn and excited about digging for information , that will rub off on the kids and spark their own interests.<br><br>
for fun math / science stuff...ie: doing it "school" work without them knowing...<br><br>
Chalk + sidewalk = great math fun ( I'll draw a pie and you cut it into five equal pieces... or I'll write the word and you write the number ...two is 2....)<br><br>
Mini-trampoline + bouncy child = great math fun ( bounce me the answer to 5+3)<br><br>
Swing at park + green army man action figure = science lesson in physics<br><br><br>
poster paint + spare butter tubs + scrap paper = art lessons in mixing colors , science lesson on light reflecting , math lesson on butter tub to available paintbrush ratios....<br><br>
three cheap muffin mixes (just add milk) + one muffin tin = math lesson on how many times needed to fill the muffin tin<br><br><br>
book on tape + sunny afternoon + quilt on the front yard + action figures to act out the story = envy of the neighborhood kids (bring extra figures , you'll need them...six kids and two adults from down the street joined us last time we did this...spontaneously joined in)<br><br>
homemade playdough + old magazines + challenge of copying pictures seen in magazine = hours of 3D art fun , math lesson in shapes/sizes / dimension<br><br>
Kids allowance money+ trip to the thrift store = chance to explore using real money , value of items , how items devalue quickly , what makes a good bargain..and a chance to interact with little old ladies who run the thrift store and hear countless entertaining stories of "when I was your age" (lesson in things that cannot have a value put on them)<br><br>
*****<br>
when I say "lesson" I really mean "fun discussion without talking down to the child."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,472 Posts
Just to add to Jen123's great ideas is Games for Reading, Writing, and Math by Peggy Kaye. (Three separate books) These are really wonderful and will give her all sorts of ideas for making these subjects fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,867 Posts
Spring time is a good time to be doing activties geared towards nature.Making habitats,providing nesting material,and providing water/food.<br>
Also a fun thing to make is a home for a moth/butterfly.This can be made from cardboard and screening;then go find a crystalis to put into it....and wait. We found moths and right now the egg sack from our spider in the fall is sprouting open with some babies(boy are they small).<br><br>
Earth day will be coming up on April 22.Some lessons can be done around that theme.May day is the 1st of May,and there are activities for that too.<br><br>
You mentioned drawing talent. Well it may be worth mentioning that someone who has talent at that can make quite a bit of money.My mom had a portrait done of our dd.The lady drew from a photo.Cost a few hundred! To expensive for me,but we all love it. An activty I came across in my nature book has the kids painting with natural earth materails..dirt,ash,berry juices.Building a rustic book shelf out of scrap outdoor wood(not lumber).<br><br>
And ofcourse kids always love baking and science type mixing(goo) activities.Making sugar crystals(then eating them). Mixing up some pretzel dough and making letters and numbers(then eating them,lol).<br><br>
There are so many things that can teach that do not involve worksheets and books,though if kids enjoy that then let them. The above mentioned(and in other posts) are things I find school children get to do on ocassion as a *treat*. I like to do those fun things more often!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,311 Posts
<b>DESCHOOL</b> the children and family <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> spring/summer is a great time for that. As stated above there are lots of fun activities that don't appear educational on the surface to do this time of year.<br><br><a href="http://www.livingjoyfully.ca/unschooling/getting_started/what_is_deschooling.htm" target="_blank">http://www.livingjoyfully.ca/unschoo...eschooling.htm</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,121 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Jen123</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Mini-trampoline + bouncy child = great math fun ( bounce me the answer to 5+3)</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
As the owner of a mini-trampoline and the mama of a bouncy girl who's learning times tables... Thank you for this wonderful idea! She's motivated and is doing fine with the methods we've been using, but she will *love* this! I love that it can be used for basic as well as harder mental maths, and burns up some physical energy too.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,914 Posts
I agree with previous posters to let them see how she gets engaged in learning.<br><br>
When I pulled my son out of school he hated (still does) anything that looks schoolish. We do a lot of projects, a lot of games and field trip, and a lot of what I call "immersion learning".<br><br>
For example in honour of the Olympics we pretended we were in Italy. To start we looked through travel brochures and read a couple of books about Italy and then we brainstormed about what we could do if we really visited Italy. I fleshed out our ideas and we had a blast. We did things like:<br>
a Birthday Party for Gallileo (doing a couple of his science experiments as the games),<br>
we made Italian food like pizza and pasta from scratch and bought Italian treats from a specialty market,<br>
we made and visited an Italian Art Musuem in our hallway,<br>
we built the Leaning Tower of Pisa out of clay and toothpicks and did an experiement about why it is leaning and how it has been fixed<br>
we built the Rialto bridge out of popsicle sticks and made little gondolas to go under it,<br>
we made a big map of Italy and located places of interest and then traced the route of the Olympic flame,<br>
we read about Romulus and Remus which lead to reading other mythology, we learned some simple Italian,<br>
we listened to Opera and read Opera stories,<br>
we did tonnes of art projects including painting the Cistine Chappel under our dining room table and carving soap (instead of marble),<br>
we put together a crystal radio in honour of Marconi,<br>
we made tickets and brochures for Olympic events and a big poster (graph) to show the medal counts for some of our favourite countires (including colouring their flags)<br>
made a changing collage/centerpiece on our table which including things like a paper model of the colleseum, some lira, a post card, Italian flags in a vase, candles (a roman invention), a playmobile person (to represent David - lol) etc. The kids would add to it as we came across something of interest.<br><br>
Because a lot of the ideas came from the kids they were really interested. We've had a lot of fun with the travel theme in the past (we've done Mexico and China as well) and it is something my kids are asking for now. But really - you could do this kind of thing with any subject of interest.<br><br>
HTH<br>
Karen
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,976 Posts
<span></span>
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;"><span>Quote:</span></div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>neveryoumindthere</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">...a good friend of mine has 2 kids that were taken out of public school in september..she's getting discouraged and thinking of sending them back...</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<span>She really <i>must</i> allow for a decompression period - it's very rare to be able to just pull kids out of school and carry on without skipping a beat. The one thing that could ensure that the situation becomes impossible is if she skips a decompression/deschooling period and tries to conduct school at home. Here's a thread here in MDC on decompression/deschooling - if she doesn't have online access, you could print some of it up and give it to her:<br><a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=417993" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=417993</a><br><br>
They've had their time and learning supervised and orchestrated for a long time, and they need to get back to being themselves. The last thing they need is their mom behaving like a school teacher in the haven of their home - even if she's a very creative one. That can be very disconcerting - for all concerned.<br><br>
She really shouldn't even consider putting them back in school if she hasn't allowed for decompression time, done her own job of researching homeschooling, asked questions from lots of people who've had lots of experience, and seen homeschooling's possibilities within the context of something very different from school - as well as then giving them ~plenty of time~ to find their grooves.<br><br></span>
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;"><span>Quote:</span></div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">...she LOVES and is sooo good a video games and loves to draw/make things and is creative like her mom...<br>
how can we redirect that energy into things like math/science etc.</td>
</tr></table></div>
<span>A 7 year old doesn't need to learn a lot about math or science or anything else; but what she does need is to have experiences seeing the joy to be found in learning - and that leads to the rest. She can have a lot of satisfying fun learning through activities and experiments after she's had some decompression time when nobody's hovering.<br><br>
There are some really fun math websites - Counton.org, for one. Skim through the links beneath the box of articles on this math page, and you'll find good ones:<br><a href="http://www.besthomeschooling.org/gateway/inted03.html" target="_blank">http://www.besthomeschooling.org/gateway/inted03.html</a><br><br>
There's are great math computer games too - like the Zoombinis games. She can have a lot of fun playing Zoombinis with her mom. This article tells about them near the bottom - <a href="http://www.besthomeschooling.org/articles/lillian_jones_math.html" target="_blank">http://www.besthomeschooling.org/art...ones_math.html</a> - and there's a link to the Scholastic website where you can get FREE demos!<br><br>
If you go to the library and look through the juvenile non-fiction section, you'll find books of books with project ideas, including kids' science experiments. You'll also find some online - look through these annotated links, and you'll be amazed what's available:<br><a href="http://www.besthomeschooling.org/gateway/inted04.html" target="_blank">http://www.besthomeschooling.org/gateway/inted04.html</a><br><br>
Besides the card ideas you mention, for later reference, Peggy Kaye has books with games for learning all the basics. Here's a page of her things at Amazon.com:<br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fgp%2Fsearch%2Fref%3Dbr_ss_hs%2F103-0897187-5792625%3Fsearch-alias%3Daps%26keywords%3Dpeggy%2520kaye" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=...s=peggy%20kaye</a><br><br>
And Linda Dobson has a fun book of ideas that were contributed by homeschooling families: The Ultimate Book of Homeschooling Ideas: 500+ Fun and Creative Learning Activities for Kids Ages 3-12<br><br>
They're obviously bright and curious, so they don't need learning projects set up for them right now. It's one thing to set up some projects for just plain ol' fun - not things specifically geared toward incorporating school subjects. They have plenty of time ahead for learning the things they need to learn. Setting up a project might only prove that they can go through the motions of the project. It might provide them with some new information, and it might exercise various skills they have - but it's not necessary in the big picture. So you want to make sure you're not creating any busy work - kids can see right through that.<br><br>
And you need to tread carefully where setting up projects about their interests is concerned - you can ruin a child's interest in a subject by making it into a study. The most wonderful and rewarding interests of all are the ones where adults provide support and materials but don't get in and try to make things into lessons or a study - or where the adults happen to be interested in the same thing and are learning right alongside. Kids love it when they can own their interest and tell their parents things they didn't know. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I LOVE this article that interviews John Holt <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> ! <a href="http://www.context.org/ICLIB/IC06/Holt.htm" target="_blank">http://www.context.org/ICLIB/IC06/Holt.htm</a><br>
This would be a great one to print up and share with your friend!<br><br>
Good luck! Tell her the opinionated mom of a homeschool grad who's now a college student says "Don't you dare give up! Relax - it can work, and it can be the best thing that ever happened to the family!" -<br><br>
EDITED TO NOTE! Whoops! For some reason, I hadn't seen that there were already responses here to the original post. A lot of what I said has already been suggested! Oh well, I guess this just gives them more oomph! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> Lillian</span>
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top