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My MIL gave me several little cardigans that she knitted for my DH 29 years ago. When I asked how to wash them she said that she washed them before she put them away, but that was 29 years ago, I would like to wash them again.<br>
How do I? What would I use?
 

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I have lots of little sweaters like that too. If they are not wool you could wash them on the gentle cycle and dry them flat. If they are wool I would probably have them dry cleaned. Handmade sweaters are so special. My cousin just knit 2 of the most beautiful sweaters for my boys for Christmas. They are wool icelandic type sweaters, I will just spot clean them for now and once they need to be laundered I will take them to the dry cleaners.
 

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if they're wool you could just hand wash them with wool wash like wool soakers. like sudz n' dudz or the like.
 

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I would probably get some baby shampoo (natural of course <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">) and handwash them in the sink in lukewarm water. Roll in a towel to get the excess water out and dry flat.<br><br>
That is what I do with wool soakers and wool sweaters, but even if these aren't wool they are special and I would want to treat them delicately.
 

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I wash those items by turning them inside out and using very diluted baby detergent. I let them soak cool ( not cold ) water in the detergent solution for a bit, swish around then rinse by dunking in cool water several times...or letting them sit in fresh water then dunking. I ball them up loosely to get out some of the rinse water then lay them flat on a clean towel untilmost of the water is gone then hang them loosely like over the shower rod. I would be careful using body soaps and shampoo because they may contain oils which may dull the knits or cause a build up in the fabric.<br><br>
gerlassie
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kathywiehl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10303616"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would probably get some baby shampoo (natural of course <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">) and handwash them in the sink in lukewarm water. Roll in a towel to get the excess water out and dry flat.<br><br>
That is what I do with wool soakers and wool sweaters, but even if these aren't wool they are special and I would want to treat them delicately.</div>
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If you can get to a yarn shop for some wool wash - that's the easiest. You just soak them, roll out the excess moisture and let them dry flat - no rinsing or anything. If that's not available, the definitely the baby shampoo - I just let them soak for a bit, swish them around and rinse gently. It's not all that much extra work - remember a little bit of shampoo goes a long way, so just use a few drops per garment.
 

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Actually, I'd never take heirlooms to a dry cleaners. They cannot guarantee that their chemicals will not damage the item and if they do, they reimburse you but these things are priceless. I've had too many things get ruined at professional cleaners that I do everything myself unless it can very easily be replaced at a local store.
 

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Yep- what Kathy said. TBH (looks around shamefacedly) most of my handknits go in the washing machine on a wool cycle with a little bit of ecover wool/delicates wash in there and nothing bad happens. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/bag.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Bag">: Oh, I wash handknit cottons on the wool cycle too. I've lost one cardigan over the past two years, and that was something that snuck into a 60 degree wash and tumble dryer with the main load of laundry.
 
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