Mothering Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
641 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

I have been crocheting for awhile but I had a pattern that says to work into your turning chain.

Does that mean the space or the back hump?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,272 Posts
Does it instruct you to chain one or two stitches at the end of the row? My guess is that is the "turning chain" they are referring to.

Normally the chain stitches you add at the end of the row count as the first stitch on the second row, and will keep your borders straight and stitch count even. Normally you only stitch into these at the end of the next row (just before you turn around, you'll stitch into the last-- or first, whatever-- stitch of this chain, and the others replace the "post" on a normal stitch.)

If so, you'd normally chain 2-3 stitches (depending on if you are using sc or dc, tc, etc.) at the end of the row, and then if your borders are supposed to be straight, you stitch into the *2nd* stitch of the previous row, not the first. The chain stitches stack up on top of the last row's final stitch and when complete will make a neat edge and keep you from adding or subtracting stitches on accident/ Depending on the pattern, they might want you to stitch into one of the chain stitches you just made, especially if you are increasing on the edge rather than in the body of the work.

Am I, like, totally confusing you now? Sorry. No work for me in the crochet technical writing world. :p
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
641 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Does it instruct you to chain one or two stitches at the end of the row? My guess is that is the "turning chain" they are referring to.

Normally the chain stitches you add at the end of the row count as the first stitch on the second row, and will keep your borders straight and stitch count even. Normally you only stitch into these at the end of the next row (just before you turn around, you'll stitch into the last-- or first, whatever-- stitch of this chain, and the others replace the "post" on a normal stitch.)

If so, you'd normally chain 2-3 stitches (depending on if you are using sc or dc, tc, etc.) at the end of the row, and then if your borders are supposed to be straight, you stitch into the *2nd* stitch of the previous row, not the first. The chain stitches stack up on top of the last row's final stitch and when complete will make a neat edge and keep you from adding or subtracting stitches on accident/ Depending on the pattern, they might want you to stitch into one of the chain stitches you just made, especially if you are increasing on the edge rather than in the body of the work.

Am I, like, totally confusing you now? Sorry. No work for me in the crochet technical writing world. :p
This totally makes sense and I think I have been adding stitches - I have been working on more hats which I think I have mastered in regards to that they aren't coming out to big or too small ( I use either do them in continuous spirals or if DC I don't count my turning chain as . I haven't made any scarfs and I was working on a blanket but I was not within the pattern and I was either short stitches or add more stitches and then I was adjusting so it wasn't too terrible.

If the turning chain (DC) counts as a stitch then I would skip the stitch that it directly beside the turning chain and go into the next instead? Does my question make sense?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,272 Posts
Yes. Your turning chain counts as the first stitch of the next row (almost all the the time*) and so you would skip the last true stitch of the previous row (the one you just stitched before making the chain) and stitch into the second, unless instructions say otherwise.

English and American instructions have different names for the stitches: a chain stitch in American is a "single crochet" in English. A "single crochet" in American is a "double crochet" in English, etc. In the American nomenclature, for a single crochet stitch, the turning chain will be 2 chain stitches: one stitch for the "post", the second chain is for the "loop" (or whatever) at the top of a regular stitch. For American double crochet, you would make 3 chain stitches for turning, etc.

*There are some exceptions for various reasons, but if you are making straight edges, this is how you do it.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top