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My husband wants to know if homeschoolers have adjustment/academic issues when going from home environment to college. We are looking to homeschool this fall and he still needs some convincing.
 

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I've met homeschooled kids who are now in college by going to homeschool workshops and conferences near me. They seemed to be doing well. I've also talked to two college professors that said their students that are coming out of homeschooling as opposed to another form of school actually tend to do better because they're more self-motivated and have better direction.
 

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I went to PS and was never homeschooled. College was VERY different than high school. So much more independent study and self motivation is required. I would think that homeschooled children would have mastered those skills well, better than their public school counterparts.<br><br>
Just my own opinion though.<br><br>
Kasey
 

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Colleges look upon homeschooling fondly for this very reason. They have had so much independent study that this is an enviorment that homeschoolers generally thrive in very well. There have been many articles and studies done. All that I've seen have been in favor of homeschoolers doing well in college. I do not have any links handy but I'm sure if you search around you will fid them with ease.
 

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My oldest (now 21) started college in 2001. He felt that he had a much easier time adjusting to college life than the kids who came straight from high school. As an unschooler, he was used to being responsible for his learning, prioritizing tasks and managing his time. Many of his schooled peers had tremendous difficulty with schedules, and quite a few went a little nuts with partying. They had always had someone telling them what to do and when to do it, so when they were finally on their own, they were more than a little lost.<br><br>
As far as academics go, his only problem was trying to narrow down the fields of study he was interested in - everything sounded cool to him!
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk">:
 

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My oldest is starting college in the fall with one of the biggest scholarships that our university has to offer. What I've found is that there are some obstacles to overcome, like the unfamiliarity that most of the college administration have with homeschooling (at least here) and the confusion that exists about some of the standards for admission. That being said, I've found that most of the administrative people that I've dealt with have been more than cooperative.<br><br>
We've had several friend-families send their children to various colleges. None that I've heard of have had problems of any size or significance. My child is looking forward to school this fall.
 

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Well, this is just anecdotal evidence about one student, so YMMV. But, I teach high school, and one particularly bright student I have was homeschooled until 9th grade. She's now in 11th, and just doesn't "play school" very well. Meaning she forgets deadlines and such. If I tell her she missed turning in an essay, she'll say, "I was going to do it later," not understanding that I expect essays on the day they are due. I'm getting the sense that her parents were very lax about when and how they had her do any work. So, she's getting terrible grades, even though she is very bright.<br><br>
I also get the sense that she craves the freedom from her parents that school offers--so she sluffs a lot to be with her friends.
 

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Do some of them have issue yes. But he needs to walk around a campus at the beginning of any college year and you will find that most Freshmen have some sort of adjustment issue to deal with.<br><br>
Home schooling won't proof your child from these issue, neither will public schooling.
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">What does YMMV mean?</div>
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<b>Y</b>our <b>M</b>ileage <b>M</b>ay <b>V</b>ary
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">But, I teach high school, and one particularly bright student I have was homeschooled until 9th grade. She's now in 11th, and just doesn't "play school" very well. Meaning she forgets deadlines and such. If I tell her she missed turning in an essay, she'll say, "I was going to do it later," not understanding that I expect essays on the day they are due.</td>
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Well, fwiw, I was NOT homeschooled, and <i>I did the exact same things</i> <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Well, I understood that the teacher expected them, but that still didn't mean I felt it was important enough to do on the teacher's timeline.<br><br>
I also didn't "play school" very well when it came to attendance, once my parents let me deal with the consequences myself, and stepped aside. I regularly missed the max number of days allowed per quarter, of course being sure to pick and choose the days carefully, so as not to miss anything I found relevant (I took all honors courses, which were typically better than regular ones, but still had plenty of dead days).<br><br>
I kept up fine, and didn't ask anything extra of my teachers. I'd get notes from a friend. For a while, I had one teacher who would keep up with what assignments I had missed, and would keep reminding me. I would go ahead and do some of them late. And some I wouldn't. I was perfectly happy taking a zero every now and then, because I only let my grade get so low (I was college bound). So if I could "afford" to not do a partiucular assignment, and it didn't seem interesting, then I'd just not do it. After a while, this teacher seemed to "get" that she wasn't really doing either of us any favors by keeping on me about the assignments. I was still doing which ones <i>I</i> wanted to do, and it only created more stress for her to fuss it.<br><br>
So, that's just a pov from someone who was in public school, k-12.
 

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I think that it is possible that homeschooling can leave a child with bad study habits. So can school. I think that homeschooled children can be lazy. So can school educated children be. I think that children vary. I think good kids who are willing to work as they need to will do well. I think that some people fail. I think that more succeed when they really try.
 
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