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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have low thyroid so my doctor put me on armour thyroid which is thyroid from pigs. My husband and I are thinking about baby #2 (we have a little boy<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> ) but I'm afraid to get pregnant without knowing if it is completely safe while taking this pig thyroid. My doctor said it is safe but I have heard of other stories where a woman was taking meds that her doctor said were safe to take while pregnant and then she found out it was actually very risky! If anyone knows anything about this please comment. THANKS!
 

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Thyroid replacement medication is considered among the safest medications available for pregnant moms. Armour thyroid has a Pregnancy Category rating of "A". For comparison, tylenol has a pregnancy category rating of "B". "A" means "As demonstrated by studies that are adequate and well controlled, no risk to the fetus has been shown in the first rimester. In addition, there does not appear to be risk in the second or third tirmester. Fetal harm is probably remote." per my drug handbook.<br><br>
I think that the negative effects of hypothyroidism are much worse than possible negative side effects of the medication. Others may have another opinion, naturally. I hope you get a variety of opinions and information here!<br><br>
Lori<br><br>
eta: my drug handbook also states: "Thyroid hormones do not readily corss the placenta; minimal amounts enter breastmilk."<br><br>
I might add that at our office, we routinely check the thyroid levels at the initial lab draw, and then at the 28 week point if a mom has a thyroid issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info - very reasuring!<br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I think that the negative effects of hypothyroidism are much worse than possible negative side effects of the medication.</td>
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I'm sorry to be so ignorant on this subject (I found out about my thyroid just a couple months ago) but can you tell me more about the neg. effects of hypothyroidism on pregnancy? Thanks
 

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well, there's lots of negative effects of hypothyroidism in general not specific to pregnancy, but i just wanted to mention that if you're uncomfortable with the armour thyroid there is a synthetic version. the brand name is synthroid and the generic is levothyroxine i believe. some people prefer the armour and some people like synthroid. i've never tried the armour. i've taken synthroid for years and have had no problems with it during pregnancy. during my current pregnancy we did have to adjust my dose which is not at all atypical during pregnancy. i feel much better with the dose adjusted. i was just plain wiped out early in my pg this go round.<br><br>
completely untreated hypothyroidism can lead to "cretinism". i always have liked that description! you'd feel awful before it got that bad, though. it can lead to depression and extreme lethargy. i don't know what effects it has specifically on a developing babe, but imho it's better to stay on meds. other's mileage may vary...<br><br>
hth
 

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I've been on synthroid since I was 11 years old (hypothyroidism runs in my family). My mother has been on thyroid medication since adolescence as well.<br><br>
You absolutely do want to keep taking your medication, and your TSH, T3, and T4 levels should get checked every 4-6 weeks during pregnancy (it takes 6 weeks after adjusting medication levels for the new levels to stabilize). Mine hasn't needed adjusting at all, but it isn't uncommon to need more during pregnancy as the body needs higher levels and in absence of hypothyroidism would produce them on its own.<br><br>
Untreated hypothyroidism results in all sorts of risks in pregnancy, including miscarriage, premature delivery, increased risk of preeclampsia, and adverse effects on fetal development. (I cite an article I found at Mayo Clinic's site.) If you do a search you can find all sorts of info on hypothyroidism online, as well as how it affects pregnancy.<br><br>
In short, take your medication and make sure they check your levels as often as they should. Thyroid hormone is a supplement for something your body ought to have but is lacking. It doesn't hurt the baby in any way, and a body suffering from the effects of its lack isn't as well equipped for pregnancy. Not taking your medication is far more likely to do harm than taking it!!!!<br><br>
By the way, synthroid is also cheaper than the stuff they get from pigs, but once you're on a thyroid med and it's working for you it's best not to change the type or even brand because it can change your dosing and that shouldn't be fiddled with during pregnancy unless absolutely necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you everyone for your input. Just to make sure I have this right... "In a nut shell" it's perfectly safe to get pregnant while on armour <b>and</b> having hypothyroidism as well (as long as I stay on my meds) - correct?
 

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I have hypothyroidism, Hashimotos(genetic). I am also on Synthroid. I have asked about the other kind butmy Dr. prefers the synthroid as it is more "regulated" whatever that means.<br><br>
Untreated hypothyroidism can cause problems in pregnancy. The baby needs that hormone to grow proper. I lost a baby last year, and I feel it was due to neglect on my GP part. When I went in saying i was pregnant, i was sent away to wait for an appointment the the OB, as it was "too early for them to do anything for me". But the time I got in to see the OB(I had one appointement) she sent me for blood work, the week after that apointment, my baby died. The blood work came back that I was grossly undertreated. That may be the result of not being tested earlier.<br><br>
I'm currently 7 months along with a very active and big baby <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> I get my thyroid tested monthly. I've changed meds 4 times during this time, and the last couple months things have regulated, but we are still testing monthly. We are doing this incase my need changes, but being overtreated can be as bad as undertreated as it can deny the baby the hormone required.<br><br>
But other than watching the TSH levels, etc, this is a very boring pregnancy. Nothing exciting other than normal aches and pains.<br><br>
Yes, to answer your last post, you can be safely pregnant with hypothyroidism, providing you're treated and regulated as best you can.
 

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Ditto to the end of Touch of Sunshine's post. My baby is due any day, I haven't had any complications of any kind...I'd still be seeing a midwife and just having a doc check my thyroid and preparing for a homebirth if it wasn't for money issues/insurance.
 

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Hiya,<br><br>
Just to add my 2 cents to the toher replys.<br><br>
As has been said above, it is very important to keep taking your thyroid medication . Hypothyroidism can cause (temporary) infertiliy which treatment with thyroixine will reverse.<br><br>
Also, as stated above an untreated unbalanced thyroid has implications for the baby.<br><br>
As soon as you fnd out you are pregnant make sure that your thyroid levels (TSH3 and 4) are checked out and then regularly checked throughout the pregnancy. You will probably need to take more thyroxine whilst you are pregnant and getting your levels checked regularly means you will be taking the correct dose.<br><br>
I am taking 25mcg more than I usually take and will be seeing the consultant tomorrow for an update.<br><br>
Thyroxin supplements are perfectly safe to take whilst pregnant.<br><br><a href="http://thyroid.about.com/blpregnancy.htm" target="_blank">About.com</a> has a very thorough section on thyroid disorders and pregnancy and should help to put your mind at rest.
 

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my sister was just diagnosed w/the hashimoto's (sp?) hypothyroidism too. she kept telling her GP that she thought she had a thyroid problem.<br><br>
she had 2 miscarriages and moved before her new OB saw it as a problem.<br><br>
amy
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks again to everyone who has taken the time to respond to my post. It has been enlightening and has encouraged me to do a lot more digging for information before I get pregnant. Mel<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hippie.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hippie">
 

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One thing to keep in mind is that having your thyroid off kilter can also impair fertility.
 
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