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I am going back and forth on weither or not I will homeschool my kids. dd would start K in the fall of 2007 and I'm seriously concidering homeschooling. The biggest reason is because school can be truely painful, and destructive to a childs self worth. (yes I was one of those kids that was teased and was shy and really hated herself at times) And I do think that kids need to play with other kids. I'll enroll them in dance or sports outside of the school system. But I have one question and I'm sure you all have answered it a million times to others, but here it goes again....<br>
Do you plan on enrolling them in public school after elementary school, what about high school?<br>
How do you all acomplish teaching them everything that they need to know when the subjects get a little harder? Like chemistry, biology, or a foreign language. I honestly don't understand that stuff much. And did horribly in school.<br>
The things that I loved about HS were Band and Ceramics/Art class. I honestly dont' know much about the activites that my town has for homeschooling kids.<br>
Does anyone homeschool thru elementary school then enroll them for middle or high school.....<br><br>
Thanks so much.
 

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I honestly have no way to answer your question, as we don't know what we will do w/ our kids either. It's just so hard to decide. What I do know, right now, is that DD won't go to any public Preschool, so I've decided to just "do preschool" here at home, and see how it goes. I can always change my mind, I can enroll her at any time. I don't HAVE to decide about 1st grade, or 8th grade right now, and honestly, it would be foolish to try to decide b/c we have no idea what our DDs personality will be like, or even what our own personality will be like in 3, 5 or even 10 years from now. I kept trying to research all the groups in my area (all very CHristian, Im not) to see what it would be like, but honestly, it's just NOT time yet! I really hope a secular group is formed at some time in the next few years, but if not, I might have to try my hand at it. Or maybe dance or such will be enough? How can I possibly know?<br><br>
Just take it one day at a time. Decide what you want to do right now, for this next school year. Your DD would be in Preschool, so start w/ that. See how well she catches on, what types of stuff she learns best with, and what activities she seems to do well in! I'd maybe make up a list of things I'd like for her to know before starting kindy, and go from there. Make it fun, and when kindy time comes, then you can decide to keep her home another year, or send her to PS <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Do you plan on enrolling them in public school after elementary school, what about high school?</td>
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Not at this time. My plan is to homeschool until graduation. We'll take it a year at a time tho and see what is right for our family.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">How do you all acomplish teaching them everything that they need to know when the subjects get a little harder? Like chemistry, biology, or a foreign language. I honestly don't understand that stuff much. And did horribly in school.</td>
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There are CoOps, community college classes, tutors.....it can be done. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The things that I loved about HS were Band and Ceramics/Art class. I honestly dont' know much about the activites that my town has for homeschooling kids.</td>
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Depends on what is available in your area. Here in the Tulsa area there is a HS band, choir, sports groups, etc. As far as art-type classes, usually you can find stuff like that at a community center or park board.
 

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My dd is 6 so it is hard to answer about high school now. I don't even know where we will be living then. We are really going to take it year by year and do what works best for her at the time. When she is high school age (if we are still homeschooling) we will probably let her decide if she wants to try school.<br>
If she wants to stay with homeschool we could probably find a tutor for subjects we are not as strong in or find other options for learning those things. Or maybe I'll have learned some of that stuff by that time.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mommaToThree</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Do you plan on enrolling them in public school after elementary school, what about high school?<br>
How do you all acomplish teaching them everything that they need to know when the subjects get a little harder? Like chemistry, biology, or a foreign language.</div>
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No, I don't plan on enrolling them in school. My oldest would be a freshman this year and he has no desire at all to go to high school. My dd would be in 5th grade. She has no interest in going to school either. If any of my kids wanted to go, we'd talk about it, but I wouldn't tell them they couldn't go, nor would I plan it for them.<br><br>
*I* don't plan to teach my kids "everything they need to know." They've taught themselves some things, family and friends have helped with other things, and they've taken classes here and there. I also don't feel there's a time frame for them to learn anything--when they're interested, or have a need, they are perfectly capable of learning whatever it is and if I can't help them directly, then I'll help them find a person or book or website or program that can help them.<br><br>
I DO know a couple of teens who were homeschooled all their lives until high school, when they chose to go to public school. They seem to be enjoying it and, as far as I know, plan to continue. So, people make all sorts of changes in their hsing, depending on what their kids need. It's possible to enter high school after hs, but it's possible to hs all the way through too.
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Do you plan on enrolling them in public school after elementary school, what about high school?<br>
How do you all acomplish teaching them everything that they need to know when the subjects get a little harder?</td>
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I am planning on homeschooling them until they move on to a college or career. I don't see high school as something I need the public school for any more than I need them for the early grades. As for teaching them everything they need to know, I'm willing to hire tutors, enroll them in community college classes and learn the subjects along with them if I have to.
 

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My oldest will be of kindergarten age in the fall and more than likely I will be homeschooling. I really have no idea about the future as far as high school. I think I will be constantly re-evaluating the situation and going from there.<br><br>
I do believe I am capable of "teaching" them everything they need to know even though I don't know calculus and such. I agree with the pp that said my children will teach themselves. And I will probably learn a lot along the way. I am just here as a guide to expose them to as much as possible and give them the tools to learn whatever they desire.<br><br>
If necessary they can take random classes at a local high school or even better a community college when the time comes.<br><br>
Honestly I think I'll just take each day at a time and will be open to change if I think it's in their best interest.
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">How do you all acomplish teaching them everything that they need to know when the subjects get a little harder? Like chemistry, biology, or a foreign language. I honestly don't understand that stuff much. And did horribly in school.</td>
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Your comments about yourself really struck me... Given that you went to public school and feel like you "don't understand that stuff", I'd argue that public schools aren't necessarily so great at teaching that stuff<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I think that whether your kids really need to know a lot of chemistry, biology, or a foreign language will depend on their own goals. If they want to seek out areas that you don't know much about, there are always community colleges, tutors, and various other resources (maybe another homeschooling parent with different knowledge and skills, for example).<br><br>
My DD is not even 4 yet, so I don't know what the future will bring. At the moment, I intend to homeschool her for at least as long as she wants to be homeschooled. I fully expect her to be interested in stuff that I don't know much about (that's actually happened already). I intend to either learn with her or to help her seek out resources so that she can learn what she wants to learn.<br><br>
As far as art classes and band, you may be able to enroll your child in just those classes, depending on the area where you live. Alternatively, you could seek out alternatives that might be just as good (a community band, drum corps, community art classes) if you and your child decide that public school is not what you want to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you guys so much for your replies.<br>
I do like the idea or tudors or Community College later if they need something that I can't teach.<br>
I guess I was thinking that it was all or nothing, and I see that isn't the case.That I can enroll them anytime.<br>
I'm already in the homeschool mindset everyday, when the girls and I are learning. So now i'm a little bit more at ease about starting.<br>
Thank you guys so much.
 

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I agree with the other pps! I would also like to add, that looking at the whole BIG picture would send me to bed at any grade level! LOL!!<br><br>
In our PS district, HSers can enroll their dc in any class or classes anytime. Not at our Catholic school however! I really wanted dd to keep taking art from the art teacher there, but they said no-but then again, they want my money for all day school. Public school already has my $$!!<br><br>
BTW, when I first read your post, it reminded me of BFing....I freaked the first time I saw a dc bfing at 4yo! HA!! Little did I know I would be BFing my dc till they were in their four's!!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
Anyway, we are taking it one year at a time. Or, when I had a hysterectomy back in August, I couldn't handle both of my dc, so I sent the one that *wanted* to go to school to our Catholic school -for 3 months. That's another thread in and of itself, but FYI-I was glad I had the option when I needed it!<br><br>
mp<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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My son is in college now. His last year of school was 1st grade before he began taking a few assorted classes that interested him at the community college in his teens as high school enrichment. He didn't formally study math, science, or any of the other traditional school subjects - but he read a lot and researched his interests. When he began taking classes part time at the community college for college credit, he did very well. He then spent a year away from home volunteering full time in a residential program through AmeriCorps at a soup kitchen/services center - an amazing education.<br><br>
After that, he took an SAT test from a prep book to see what he needed to study, found that he needed to study algebra, went to a tutor, told her exactly what algebra he needed to study, took the test, and did great. He had merit scholarship offers from 2 of the 3 colleges he applied to before he could finish the application for the 3rd. And he's now in his first choice, and doing very well, including in chemistry. I never had to teach him anything much - I learned early on that he was his own best teacher. I just needed to provide a lot of opportunities and good resources. <i>His is not a particularly unusual story!</i><br><br>
Some colleges want to see a foreign language, lab science, etc., but he didn't happen to be attracted to any of those schools - if he had been, he would have simply taken those things at the community college instead of just taking things that interested him. Colleges like to see some grades in transcripts other than just mom transcripts, so it's a good idea to take a few outside classes sometime during the teen years.<br><br>
Bottom line - you don't have to worry about all that - it will sort itself out. If your child is drawn to a special school or career in early teens, he can get in touch with them to find out what they want to see, and follow a course of study that will satisfy their requirements. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br><a href="http://www.besthomeschooling.org/articles/lillian_jones_life.html" target="_blank">An article about our story.</a> Lillian</span>
 

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I do plan on hsing DD until graduation, we've disscussed this and she has no desire to go back to school. With DS I am planning on hsing as long as it works. For now I am not even putting school out there as an option. He's 7 and I don't feel he can truly understand how bad school would be for him at this time. When he gets older and can make a more informed decision then we'll discuss it if it comes up.<br><br>
There are many options for those classes you don't feel qualified to teach (or help with if your not the teaching sort). As others have mentioned there are college classes, tutors, etc and you will find that you will learn along with them as well. A good calculus curriculum (for instance) might be able to help you both understand calculus. I am learning more world history now then I ever did in school.
 

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If it were me I would homeschool for elementary and worry about high school when we came to it. Even if you or your kids wanted to do high school when the time came, they would be at so much of an advantage over the schooled-all-along kids in being secure in themselves, their identities, and their values. My niece was homeschooled until high school, and because she had been raised without the destructive forces of institutionalization she had a much easier time resisting peer pressure and thinking for herself.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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We just made the decision to homeschool, at least for now. We were considering some prek as an option, until we read <a href="http://pace.berkeley.edu/pace_stanford_berkeley.html" target="_blank">this</a> study. I had been wanting a montessori education for prek and kindy. Now, I will homeschool. The kindy here stinks, it's full day, they have nap time, they watch movies, and they don't get recess. Not developmentally appropriate, IMO!!! Plus, DS tells me he wants to do "pretend school" at home like his friend LOL. We're military, so we move a lot, so continuing with it will have its advantages, but I honestly don't know for how long we'll continue it. If we all love it, maybe forever; if not, we'll consider stopping. I'm not going to worry about the later years at this point, they are just soooo far away. I would just take it one year at a time; it's less overwhelming and it's too hard to plan that far ahead anyway! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>True Blue</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">...and they don't get recess.</div>
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<span>Do you mean this literally??? They don't let them go out and play at all during a full day??? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yikes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="EEK!"> That's sick.<br><br><br>
- Lillian</span>
 

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From what I understand!! My friend whose DD goes says they don't get a "real" recess, whatever that means. I'll have to ask her tomorrow. My other friend's DS is in 4th grade and they have had 2 recesses this year. And PE once a week. :puke
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>True Blue</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">From what I understand!! My friend whose DD goes says they don't get a "real" recess, whatever that means.</div>
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I could mean that they have what one of our local schools call *guided recess*. Basically the kids have to run two laps around the school before they can do anything else and even then they are *encouraged* to join in structured games led by the teachers. It's supposed to encourage physical activity, as opposed to having the kids sitting under the jungle gym talking I guess. IMO they should just let the kids have their 20minutes of free time for crying out loud <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes">
 

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I don't even think it's that, bc she tries to get her to play outside after school everyday to make up for it, as in she doesn't get physical activity. I wonder if it's just free time in the class or something? I'll really try to remember to ask her in the morning LOL.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Lillian J</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><span>Do you mean this literally??? They don't let them go out and play at all during a full day??? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yikes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="EEK!"> That's sick.</span></div>
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My mom teaches 1st grade, and those kids get part of their lunch break as "recess" and that's it. At the beginning of the year, she was allowed to "sneak" them outside for a 2nd "recess" as well, but that was just to "help them make the transition to all day class."
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>UlrikeDG</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My mom teaches 1st grade, and those kids get part of their lunch break as "recess" and that's it. At the beginning of the year, she was allowed to "sneak" them outside for a 2nd "recess" as well, but that was just to "help them make the transition to all day class."</div>
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<span>Are they MAD????!!!! What planet did these educrats come from? Is this a new trend all over the country? Please say it isn't so. Oh, my gosh - is this a response to the No Child Left Behind frenzy? Okay - if this were the only reason to not send a child to school, it would be enough. They're really doing harm to a generation of future adults who are going to be running things in our world. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> - Lillian</span>
 
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