Mothering Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,233 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a roughly 20-year-old grain mill, that used to be my grandma's. She lived on a wheat farm, so there is wheat residue in there that will not be able to be 100% eliminated.<br><br>
But if ever go on a wheat-limiting diet (b/c of the residue, I couldn't use it if I had to eliminate wheat totally, probably), in theory I could use that grinder to make almond flour, right? The instruction book says that I can use it to make cornmeal and even grind up flaxseed and stuff, so I would think that almonds could be ground up there as well, and it would probably be more cost-effective than buying the flour already ground, right?<br><br>
Or maybe I would have to food-process them into grain-sized pellets first.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,677 Posts
Most grain-mills caution against grinding nuts with them. When you grind nuts, you don't make "flour", you make paste (or butter). Commercially available almond flour has had the oil removed prior to grinding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,233 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yeah I thought about the oil afterwards. And I rechecked my manual, and it didn't mention flaxseed but instead mentioned that I could mill soybeans. I wonder how much oil a soybean has versus an almond? The almonds would still probably have more oil, I guess.<br><br>
Guess I'll just stick w/ the commercial stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
I was curious about this too. I found this link where this woman makes her own using a blender. She says it takes a long time to make and is a bit of a pain, but it's possible. I haven't tried it yet, but was going to if the price of almond flour is too high in Canada. (I'm embarking on a gluten free adventure starting today!)<br><br><a href="http://almondflour.homestead.com/" target="_blank">http://almondflour.homestead.com/</a>
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top