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USA Today Editorial/Opinion<br>
09/02/2003<br><br>
Home is no place for school<br>
By Dennis L. Evans<br><br>
The popularity of home schooling, while not significant in terms of<br>
the number of children involved, is attracting growing attention<br>
from the media, which create the impression that a "movement" is<br>
underway. Movement or not, there are compelling reasons to oppose<br>
home teaching both for the sake of the children involved and for<br>
society.<br><br>
Home schooling is an extension of the misguided notion that "anyone<br>
can teach." That notion is simply wrong. Recently, some of our best<br>
and brightest college graduates, responding to the altruistic call<br>
to "Teach for America," failed as teachers because they lacked<br>
training. Good teaching is a complex act that involves more than<br>
simply loving children. Research on student achievement<br>
overwhelmingly supports the "common-sense" logic that the most<br>
important factor affecting student learning is teacher competency.<br>
While some parents may be competent to teach very young children,<br>
that competence will wane in more advanced grades as the content and<br>
complexity increases.<br><br>
But schools serve important functions far beyond academic learning.<br>
Attending school is an important element in the development of<br>
the "whole child." Schools, particularly public schools, are the one<br>
place where "all of the children of all of the people come<br>
together." Can there be anything more important to each child and<br>
thus to our democratic society than to develop virtues and values<br>
such as respect for others, the ability to communicate and<br>
collaborate and an openness to diversity and new ideas? Such virtues<br>
and values cannot be accessed on the Internet.<br><br>
The isolation implicit in home teaching is anathema to socialization<br>
and citizenship. It is a rejection of community and makes the home-<br>
schooler the captive of the orthodoxies of the parents.<br><br>
One of the strengths of our educational system is the wide range of<br>
legitimate forms of public, private or parochial schooling available<br>
for parental choice.<br><br>
With that in mind, those contemplating home teaching might heed the<br>
words of the Roman educator, Quintilian (A.D. 95). In opposing home<br>
schooling, he wrote, "It is one thing to shun schools entirely,<br>
another to choose from them."<br><br>
Dennis L. Evans directs doctoral programs in education leadership at<br>
the University of California, Irvine.<br><br><a href="http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/editorials/2003-09-02-" target="_blank">http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion...ls/2003-09-02-</a><br>
oppose_x.htm<br><br><br>
I'm tempted to write a letter but people like this only see their veiwpoint. Such smallmindedness is saddening to see.....
 

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You're right, people liek that only do see their viewpoint. It is sad, and this woman obviously hasn't met many (or any) homeschoolers. I wonder where S/he went to school to get those ideas anyway?
 

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<b>The popularity of home schooling, while not significant in terms of the number of children involved, is attracting growing attention from the media, which create the impression that a "movement" is underway</b><br><br>
False. Ask any school district and they will tell you homeschooling is on the rise. that is hy they are so ademently against it.<br><br><b>Home schooling is an extension of the misguided notion that "anyone can teach."</b><br><br>
He is missing the points that A) teaching a classroom is what most teachers learn and even they will tell you that teaching 1 student is a walk in the park compared to teaching 30 at one time. B) it isn't like we are pulling algebra facts out of our butt. we have the same teachers manuals available to us as the high school teachers do.<br><br><b>Can there be anything more important to each child and<br>
thus to our democratic society than to develop virtues and values<br>
such as respect for others, the ability to communicate and<br>
collaborate and an openness to diversity and new ideas? Such virtues and values cannot be accessed on the Internet.</b><br><br>
Hey, what do you know. isn't this the exact reason that most people teach thier child at home. they want them to learn values, respect, the ability to communicate, vituousness, and an open miond. I know I didn't learn these things in school. I learned to keep my mouth shut and spit out what the teacher wanted. I learned that soime people were better than others because of thier particular social class, I learned to lie, steal cheat and gossip to get by.<br><br><b>The isolation implicit in home teaching is anathema to socialization and citizenship.It is a rejection of community</b><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/blahblah.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="blah blah"> whatever. this is the same ol' same ol' from people who think we lock our children in a closet. Also on the note os citizenship. I think homeschoolers take this much more seriously that PS do.<br><br><b>and makes the home-schooler the captive of the orthodoxies of the parents.</b><br><br>
Oh no they might actually carry on thier parents values and religous beliefs. Hey! that is why I am homeschooling!!! It is the parents job to instill in thier children thier religous beliefs and values and morals.<br><br><b>One of the strengths of our educational system is the wide range of legitimate forms of public, private or parochial schooling available for parental choice.</b><br><br>
yeah but you are still sitting in a desk reading from your text book and you are still at the mercy of some stranger who happenes to be assigned to your child.<br><br><b>Dennis L. Evans directs doctoral programs in education leadership<br></b><br><br>
His title says it all. he teaches teachers to become teachers. probly teachers who teach other teachers. Because let me tell you. Dr. don't stay at the high school level for ery long.
 

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<b>Schools, particularly public schools, are the one<br>
place where "all of the children of all of the people come<br>
together."</b><br><br>
He's kidding, right? What about private schools which are basically the exclusive province of the well-off? What about areas where you can literally tell when you've walked over the line between school districts because ethnicity and class change visibly? What about schools where gangs are pervasive and learning takes a backseat to survival? The marvelous idea that the US public school is a place where "all of the children of all the people come together" is simply untrue.<br><br>
As for the rest of it, it's old hat. Socialization, parents unqualified, students isolated, blah, blah, blah. Ignores studies, ignores results -- this is a marvelous example of bad, biased writing, which hopefully any competent high school English teacher would shoot down.<br><br>
Oops, the kids are banging at the closet door again -- have to go tell them to quiet down!
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by willowsmama</i><br><b><br>
Dennis L. Evans directs doctoral programs in education leadership at<br>
the University of California, Irvine.<br><br></b></td>
</tr></table></div>
<br>
Considering this bio, and the fact that this is an OPINION piece, could we really expect anything different?
 

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The only negative part of homeschooling we've found is putting up with the outright bunk from uninformed peeps and/or educrats like the above author. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes">:
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by zannaL</i><br><b><br>
Oops, the kids are banging at the closet door again -- have to go tell them to quiet down!</b></td>
</tr></table></div>
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/ROTFLMAO.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rotflmao"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/ROTFLMAO.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rotflmao"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/ROTFLMAO.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rotflmao"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/ROTFLMAO.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rotflmao"><br><br>
(I am assuming that was a joke about locking our kids in the closet all day to keep them from socialization)
 

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Here's the letter I wrote:<br><br>
To the Editor:<br><br>
In his opinion piece “Home is no place for school” (USA Today, 9-3-03,) Dennis L. Evans argues that in order to convey advanced academic information a person must be trained in how to do so, and therefore it is inappropriate for children to be taught by anyone that is not so trained. Whether there is any truth to this or not, it is telling that Mr. Evans neglects to mention that there is currently no one theory of education that is accepted as the right and best approach, and that despite our school teachers having been trained in how to teach, our schools are failing miserably to teach very many people much of anything. This in fact is a common reason parents take their children out of school: statistically, homeschooled children do considerably better academically than do their institutionally-schooled counterparts.<br><br>
A more rational concern is the possibility of homeschooled children missing opportunities to interact with the outside world in a meaningful way. Evans makes a drastic error in judgment, however, by assuming that isolation is “implicit” in homeschooling. To the contrary, many people choose homeschooling because they wish their children to have more freedom, diversity, and opportunity than our educational system is currently able to offer, with its artificial social environment and infringements of basic civil liberties.
 

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zanna: Thicker door! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by blueviolet</i><br><b><br>
Evans makes a drastic error in judgment, however, by assuming that isolation is “implicit” in homeschooling. To the contrary, many people choose homeschooling because they wish their children to have more freedom, diversity, and opportunity than our educational system is currently able to offer, with its artificial social environment and infringements of basic civil liberties.</b></td>
</tr></table></div>
I think the above quote sums it up for me. I am homeschooling because I want to expose my child to a diverse way of looking at the world that only comes from having the freedom to have a different view. I find that in school, all too often, the most popular view (and/or the one put forth by the staff), is the one that is adopted by all.<br>
And I find that the isolation fears that are often sited by all who oppose homeschooling are just a red flag way to let me know that the person commenting really does not know much about "real homeschooling"(at least not the way I have seen it). Your reply was great Blueviolet. Thanks for responding.<br><br>
Take Care,<br>
Erika
 

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I did wanrt to point out one thing i did agree with the writer on.<br><br>
"Home is no place fror School"<br><br>
That is true. Leave school in the school house and let your children learn thier way at home. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by lilyka</i><br><b>I did wanrt to point out one thing i did agree with the writer on.<br><br>
"Home is no place fror School"<br><br>
That is true. Leave school in the school house and let your children learn thier way at home. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></b></td>
</tr></table></div>
Well said Lilyka!<br><br>
Take Care,<br>
Erika
 
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