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See my previous thread <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=544809" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=544809</a><br><br>
I've been doing everything I can think of.... I'll give the rundown<br><br>
Drinking more water, plus mother's milk tea. I have seen an increase in my supply due to this, but it hasn't helped with the biting.<br><br>
Pulling him in closer when he bites. Doesn't work, just makes him mad, he bites harder and GRINDS.<br><br>
Watching for him to bite has helped, I'm sure I've avoided about 50% of the bites this way.<br><br>
Seeing an LC... We don't have health insurance, and I cannot afford one, period.... I can't afford formula either, so weaning really isn't an actual option (it wouldn't be even if I could afford it)<br><br>
It's almost 4am, and I am in tears and SO depressed about this. We don't have a nursing "relationship" we have a nursing nightmare. I HATE feeding him. H-A-T-E. I dread it, I'd rather be beat in the head with a baseball bat. I tear up everytime he is hungry, heck, I tear up even thinking about him being hungry.<br><br>
The biting has gotten worse. Once he clamps down, he WILL NOT let go. The only way to get him to let go is to scream at the top of my lungs and scare him. I HATE doing that. I don't want to scare him. He's just a little baby and he doesn't know any better. I've tried putting him down and ending the session, but he's only seven months old, it just makes him cry so hard... I can't do that to him.<br><br>
The only time I can feed him without biting is at night, for some reason he doesn't bite in the middle of the night. I used to sleep right through those feedings, now I stay awake for the whole thing because I am just so happy that I don't have to worry about him biting me.<br><br>
This situation is just killing me... it's been going on since the day his bottom teeth broke through, almost a month now.<br><br>
I lie to my friends & family when they ask if he bites now that he has teeth. I can't bear to tell them the truth.
 

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I know that most will frown upon what I am about to say but the only way I was able to get ds to not bite me was when he did I would yell out and scare him he would cry and then not bite again for a little while. It took about a week but he finally did stop. He was about your ds age to. I do not think yelling out is a good thing by any stretch but when it comes to either weaning or doing the yelling you bet I will yell.<br><br>
I would always sooth him after and distract him so I didnt just let him cry and cry. But when you have a bad biter on your hands something has to give. And from you post you have tried everything else.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
I wanted to add that when ds would try to clamp down I would take my finger and press it into the side of his check not trying to hurt him since there is no teeth there it didnt anyway but it would make him release me.
 

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I would still put him down. Be firm about it. When DD was that age and getting teeth she was biting a bit too--not as much as yours, but sometimes. I did the things you mentioned and I would also put her down and say calmly and nicely but firmly with a sad/frowny face, "No bite!!!<br>
That hurts mommy! We can't nurse if you bite!!" She would cry and get upset, and I would generally give it a moment (like maybe 10-20 seconds) to let myself regroup and let her get the idea. Then I'd sort of just start over again, pick her up and comfort her and offer to nurse again if she wanted to.<br><br>
Also--how close/hard are you pulling him in when he bites? Are you just pulling him closer to you, or really smooshing him on the boob so that he can't breathe? It sounds terrible I know, but the idea with that one is that if he can't breathe through his nose he'll let go to breathe through his mouth and therefore release you from the Jaws of Doom!!<br><br>
Luckily it only took a little while of consistent action for us to get past the biting phase. I hope you do soon too!!!
 

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How 'bout EPing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hide.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hide">: Sorry, I know I'm going to be the only one to suggest it, but I think it might be better than screaming at and trying to sufficating a baby to keep him from biting. Pumps cost money, but less than formula...
 

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Keep your finger beside his mouth as he nurses- at the FIRST sign of him closing down, stick your finger in (between his gums) so that he can NOT bite your nipple.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
Biting is SO hard- it IS a stage though. This too shall pass....<br><br>
Have you tried some hylands in case he's teething?<br><br>
-Angela
 

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I went through a period of this with my youngest. It's horrible when you're going through it, but it doesn't last forever. Around 6-8 months is a common time for this problem.<br><br>
When a baby is nursing their tongue is wrapped around the underside of the nipple, so he can't actually bite while he's nursing. I noticed I could stop most bites before they happened by paying attention to my daughter's latch. When she did bite me I ended the nursing session. I didn't make a big deal out of it, or treat it as a punishment--I figured if she's not sucking she must be done.<br><br>
Do you have a LLL group near you? It can be very helpful to get in person help and support. I'm sure many of the group moms would have ideas that worked for them.
 

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Ditto LLL meetings! Also, what about pumping for a few days? Do you think he is doing it to get the attention of the screaming? I am so sorry this is happening to you. I go along with the pp that say something has to be done to make him aware that it is not OK to bite. I do not think weaning is the answer but maybe feeding through an alternative method until things calm down for both of you. I also agree with the idea that you need to be hyper-aware of when he will bite down. Have your finger ready.
 

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Biting is sooo hard. I have been there. My girl is almost 11 months and still gets me good sometimes. I have involintarily yelped a few times when she does this and I am so afraid I am going to cause a nursing strike I try not to do it. When I say ow! She bawls and bawls I know she doesnt mean to hurt me.<br>
Just try to remember your little one isn't trying to hurt you. I think its a combination of trying to relieve teething pain and not realizing that their new little chompers can be quite painful.<br>
It does get better, hang in there.
 

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Well, I'll probably get stoned for this one, but the same thing was happening with us (and more) and we had to drop off some nursing sessions and start supplementing. Never thought I'd do that, but my hatred of nursing was beginning to develop into a disliking my son VERY much.<br><br>
At 9 months he started biting AT LEAST 10 times a session - clamp down hard, draw blood, etc. (He's 10 months old now). He also is a big fidgeter - he had to be squirming, standing, trying to do somersaults all while biting down. Scolding him / putting him down never worked. But we kept nursing.<br><br>
Then came the ENDLESS pinching and digging his nails into my flesh. He would draw blood! He'd scratch and dig and twist my skin and pinch pinch pinch - ugh.....what a booger!!! But we kept nursing and he had to wear socks on his hands at every session. (No, cutting his nails did not help a bit).<br><br>
Then morning sickness kicked in full force and when I get pregnant I have HUGE sensory overload problems - cannot be touched, etc., when I'm in the throes of nausea. So every time he'd want to nurse I'd start only to have to put him back down immediately and run to the bathroom to puke. Then I'd pick him up to nurse again, and right back to the bathroom to puke. He would cry and cry thinking I was mad at him <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> and things were just not getting better. Even the THOUGHT of nursing sent me to puking.<br><br>
That's when I called it quits. He now gets to nurse early AMs, once in the afternoon, and before bed....and anytime in the middle of the night that he wakes up (which isn't often). The rest of the time he eats his solids (he devours table food) and gets about 2-3 bottles a day. Of formula. I can't produce anything with a pump anymore.<br><br>
So, you do what you need to do. I HATED nursing him probably as much as you hate nursing your own, if not more. And we spent so many sessions puking/in tears that it just wasn't worth it anymore...the relationship had bombed and neither one of us needed that.<br><br>
Now life is pleasant, we're both happy, and I no longer kick myself for supplementing.<br><br>
DD, by the way, was nursed till 18 months....so this has been a change for me. Then again, she was a perfect nurser.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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I don't have any advice dd doesn't have teeth yet although she was a bad gum clincher which hurts like crazy but she has finally stoped that for the most part. But anyways I just wanted to say ((((HUGS)))))!
 

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How often are you nursing? Is there any pattern to when he bites? Towards the end of the feeding? You mentioned mother's milk and some increase in supply. Some nursing issues stem from a baby frustrated when the let down decreases to more of a steady stream. They like the full force let down and get mad and fuss,bite,turn away, etc when the force of the milk slows down. If you have ever pumped and watched the milk flow it goes something like this, drop, drop, drop, then let down occurs and you get steady, strong spurts for awhile, then it levels off to the hind milk and you get a steady drop-drop-drop. That last hind-milk part is important, but some babies get mad because it isn't as strong as the earlier part. One way to avoid this is to feed more often for shorter periods. Every 1 1/2 to 2 hours even and pre-empt his hunger/frustration. Then as the flow slows down and he gets antsy, pop him off and move on quickly to some other activity (walk outside, watch out the window, etc.) That could break the routine.<br><br>
Of course if he is biting at any time of the feeding or in the middle of let down, then it's probably not this at all. Just a thought.<br>
violet
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sunnysideup</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6470015"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">When a baby is nursing their tongue is wrapped around the underside of the nipple, so he can't actually bite while he's nursing. I noticed I could stop most bites before they happened by paying attention to my daughter's latch. When she did bite me I ended the nursing session. I didn't make a big deal out of it, or treat it as a punishment--I figured if she's not sucking she must be done.<br><br>
Do you have a LLL group near you? It can be very helpful to get in person help and support. I'm sure many of the group moms would have ideas that worked for them.</div>
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I agree with this (and love the signature quote from Fred Rogers Too!)<br><br>
We went through a biting phase with my son who is a laid-back personality. He was 19 months and I was in my first trimester. I was just about to give up after weeks of trying, then the biting slowed and came to a stop. Who knows if it was how I handled it or maybe his teething pain (?) went away. I know now that he can be teething without showing any other signs other than "misbehavior" (he recently got 3 2-year molars in all at the same time). At that time I didn't know if it was teething or what.<br><br>
I would look into teething issues (or other pain?) for sure even if you don't think that's what it is. I'm normally mostly against medication BUT a little Tylenol can go a long way. It's okay to try one dose a day for a couple of days (give it like 20 minutes before you nurse to see if the effect causes a better nursing session). With just that one dose you may see an improvement. Do it a few days to prove it to yourself. I don't like to give my son Tylenol dose after dose for days on end, but one or two doses per day spaced out and well-timed 20 minutes before naps or nursing can help a lot. Like I said, I've even used "misbehavior" for no reason as an <i>indicator</i> that he's in teething pain and I still feel this is true. (He's now 2-1/2)<br><br>
We also went through a phase, earlier on like under 1 year old, of him just pulling off and screaming for no apparent reason and I figured it had to do with flow rate. I learned the squeezing/compression method to get a 2nd letdown to happen when his suck slowed. (Remember to hydrate too so your milk is plentiful). I now wonder if my body was thinking about weaning, but after several weeks of the compression routine things got better and he stopped the screaming bit. I think he had to learn to continue to suck even when the milk slowed so that the second letdown would occur on it's own. I felt that this phase was about him learning to be patient. Sounds weird, I know. I think at that time the words of a friend were my solace: <b>"Breastfeeding is the first discipline."</b><br><br>
Oh, and for anyone reading, sort of related to the above paragraph, but different issue is I find that sometimes baby releases the latch and then starts crying. It's like he/she has suddenly realized the nipple is not in their mouth. This happens with DD when she's getting sleepy and releases, then cries. She's crying only because the nipple is not in her mouth--she doesn't know why and doesn't have one thought as to why the nipple isn't in her mouth. I feel it is similar to this scenario my SIL told me about her 2-3 year old: She is handing the girl a cup and the girl cries because mommy is holding the cup! <i>Irrational</i>! But, sometimes kids just don't know cause and effect and they are just upset with the present moment; they don't understand our intention.
 

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I totally agree with the abouve post. After a long time of suffering from my sons biting I called and LLleader and they said that it was possibly because of teething. Now much later I am very clear that my son only bit me when a tooth was coming in. Sometimes it wouldn't be for a week or two until you could see any sign of the tooth but still I'm sure that was it. I would unlatch after the first slight clamp down and give him something cold to teeth on. Frozen fruit worked well for us. Especially frozen bananas blended into a kind of mush. Then I would nurse him right afterward. No more biting. I also agree with alittle Tylenol. We only gave him a tiny bit three times during the whole time he was teething but it helped us get through three very difficult nights and he would fall right asleep. To make him let go I would slip my finger between his gums and then turn it sideways. That would make just enough room to slip my nipple out without it being pulled. Biting sucks but the babys are trying to deal with their own pain and they don't know a better way. A hot breast over inflammed tissue must not feel so good. I hope this helps alittle. A big hug to you.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Daisie125</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6469000"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It's almost 4am, and I am in tears and SO depressed about this. We don't have a nursing "relationship" we have a nursing nightmare. I HATE feeding him. H-A-T-E. I dread it, I'd rather be beat in the head with a baseball bat. I tear up everytime he is hungry, heck, I tear up even thinking about him being hungry.</div>
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I can totally sympathize because I've been going through something similar. My DD bites me several times a day, and this has been going on for a few months now. I do think she bites more when she's teething and it's really picked up lately because I think she's about to sprout another tooth or two. At this time, she tends to bite mostly when she's going on or coming off the breast. She's doing a lot of comfort nursing (I'm her only pacifier) and she will go on and come off the breast ten times in a nursing session, so she's biting me that many times. I've been really disliking nursing lately because of it. Like your DS, my DD hardly ever bites at night.<br><br>
I also tried the technique of pushing my DD into the breast when she bites so she'd open her mouth, but it didn't work. When she first starting biting me, it was mainly when she was finished nursing for food and was turning the session into a game. I would say a stern "NO" when she bit me, and if it was a serious bite or the second or third bite in a row, I'd immediately take her off the breast and stop the session for at least ten minutes. She didn't fuss about it because she was finished anyway.<br><br>
Yesterday I was feeling similar to you and I decided it was time to make some changes. I'm going to start pumping so I have a supply on hand and I can feed her breastmilk from a spoon or cup instead of the constant nursing she's been demanding. (The last couple of weeks, she's been nursing about every awake hour.) I still want to be able to offer her some comfort nursing, but I need a bit of a break from the 12 nursing sessions (on average) a day right now. It's just too intense, because even if she doesn't bite me during a nursing session, I can still feel those little bottom teeth poking my breast constantly. I've talked to LLL leaders and read up on the subject so I know that DD shouldn't be biting me if she has a good latch, but I know she has a good latch and I can still feel those teeth. (DD has actually been a "nursing model" for a new mom at a LLL meeting who was trying to learn how to latch her baby on, so the LLL leaders have noted my DD has a good latch.) I don't know what's going on with it, but I do think it will get better once the next set of teeth finally breaks through!<br><br>
Kristin
 

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I know yelling isn't nice, but a loud, firm, NO!, and putting him down might help.<br><br>
Also, I agree with Angela--no casual nursing for you; you need to be on guard all the time for possible biting. At the very first sign, remove him.<br><br>
I am so sorry! Hope things get better.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>rachelernst.com</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6492454"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would look into teething issues (or other pain?) for sure even if you don't think that's what it is. I'm normally mostly against medication BUT a little Tylenol can go a long way. It's okay to try one dose a day for a couple of days (give it like 20 minutes before you nurse to see if the effect causes a better nursing session). With just that one dose you may see an improvement. Do it a few days to prove it to yourself. I don't like to give my son Tylenol dose after dose for days on end, but one or two doses per day spaced out and well-timed 20 minutes before naps or nursing can help a lot. Like I said, I've even used "misbehavior" for no reason as an <i>indicator</i> that he's in teething pain and I still feel this is true. (He's now 2-1/2)</div>
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Yes, I'm quoting myself... trying to emphasize using Tylenol or Motrin.<br><br><i>I can't believe I'm about to campaign for using Tylenol or Motrin.</i> I've been full circle on this issue, because at first I tried to not give my son any Tylenol or Motrin. I did try homeopathic stuff before using Tylenol. It just doesn't have the same effect. <i>I believe that the nursing itself gives pain relief--there are studies that show this.</i> But, the biting is one more way of your baby communicating (in a non-manipulative manner of course) that he's still in pain. You can only see the difference once you do in fact try the pain med. Even a little goes a long way. If you really want to see big results, give it when the baby is really cranky and I'd bet you'll see the relief more succinctly.<br><br>
I started out doing a drug-free Bradley pregnancy and birth. I got so used to not using any pain med that I would even not take it if I had a headache, etc. And I continued not taking it after birth because of nursing. I have had back and shoulder pain on and off since I had my son (I got injured from wearing him in the sling too long on vacation, plus nursing, etc. and my back and shoulders hurt, then and now, a lot). (By the way, Arnica homeopathic taken before nighttime sleep does help some, and massage therapy is for when I'm really bad off). But, one time it just got to the point when I had to take something--I did and was amazed at how well it worked (I had told myself that it didn't make enough difference to merit the risks). Incidentally, I really did not know WHAT the risks were. I didn't like giving him something with sweetener/sugar in it, and I let that affect my decision, too.<br><br>
I'm not advocating it all the time, because sure, the more you give it the less effect it has. We have to be careful about dosing. I like to space the doses out and use it for the critical times, like before bed so they can fall asleep, or after a long night when the pain med effect has worn off and the pain might be worse. I just use common sense.<br><br>
I've also read somewhere that taking the pain med early on for a headache is better than taking it later. The headache just gets worse and may require more medication. Now, I consider taking it earlier to <i>thus avoid taking more doses</i> to fight a worse headache, or other pain. It seems a little at the beginning is better than a lot later on.<br><br>
I had braces on my teeth for 2.5 years, headgear and all to straighten my teeth. I had a headache about 75% of the time, so when I started remembering that time of my life, I realized my baby deserves some relief from that kind of pain.<br><br>
When I went through problems with my firstborn, they seemed so major and seemed to drag out. I felt his crying for a day or two seemed like forever. It was slow time. The Phases he went through seemed to last so long. I think the real problem was just not having any idea how long they would last, so I worried that they would last a long time! Having the second baby has helped me realize that I now have perspective on how fast/slow "baby time" really is. Having already gone through it, teething, colds, etc. now seem to go by in regular time. I know if I give him or her some Tylenol, for a few days it's okay. Really. See, I really had to talk myself into it? And, the results were good. All things in moderation.
 

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I went through this with my son, also when he was about eight months. He didn't bite all the time, just when he was nursing to sleep. He would start to drift off, and clamp down. oh it really hurt!<br><br>
I stuck my finger in his mouth to unlatch him--well, obviously, not to unlatch, but to undo the chomp. i would also yell ouch if it hurt, because, you know, it hurt! Then I put him down somewhere safe to play and read or just breathed or whatever, and calmed down. He was always happy! That's his personality, though.<br><br>
Then I went back and tried again.<br><br>
It was really hard. i got a lot of support on this board. We didn't wind up weaning. I was WOH at that time and I lost a lot of sleep trying to deal with the biting. I gave teething toys, also.<br><br>
i wish I had advice. Biting sucks (pun intended!)
 

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We struggled with biting when dd was about 12-13 months old. I was pregnant and my supply was down a bit, I think that had a LOT to do with it for us. For us, the biting only happened during the session right before bed. When dd bit me (and she had a little grin on her face the whole time, too, which drove me NUTS), I unlatched her (I still to this day nurse with my thumb right next to her mouth, just in case, even though she hasn't bitten me in months), said something like, "I guess you want mom to rock you instead," and then rocked her for a few minutes. She always got mad and freaked out, but once she realized I was serious about halting the nursing session, she stopped. I sometimes wonder if it was me being very consistent that did it, or if she just got tired of it. I don't know.<br><br>
You mentioned that your ds's latch isn't the greatest...I'm not sure I'd pump and intro a bottle unless you're absolutely sure that's the route you want to go. My dd's latch got worse the more she used things like sippy cups and straws. It might be worth it to stop using those things if you are and try to get his latch back on track.<br><br>
Another thing I've done is to try to figure out why dd was biting. I think for us it was an experiment for her...she wanted to find out what I would do each time. The reason I think this is because she did end up stopping once I started having a consistent reaction. If I thought it was teething, I would keep a cold rag handy and if he bites, give him that to bite on.<br><br>
Hugs, mama. I'm sorry things are so hard right now. I'm currently struggling with dd's latch (yes, the same one who did the biting) and before I set some limits I was dreaming of weaning, too. I hope you find a solution that works.
 

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I'm having a biting phase right now, too. It's HORRIBLE! As is her crying when I take her off after a bite. Poor baby, poor you.<br><br>
But I think my new tactic of no reaction whatsoever (besides wrenching her jaws apart and putting her down), not even a calm 'no biting' is working. Have you tried that?
 
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