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A few months ago, my local town newspaper published a little blurb that all bfing babies need a Vit D supplement. It wasn't even an article, just something to take up space. I wrote a letter to the editor and they actually published it. Well, I'm at the library last night with my 3 year old and we were checking out some books about having a new sibling. The librarian asked if Kassidy had a new baby at home and I mentioned she did about a year ago. And I guess she noticed the name on my library card. Then she asked me if I wrote a letter to the paper about breastfeeding. And I'm like, oh yeah, and blushing.
She said it was very well written and really liked it. She gave a copy of it to her daughter who is also a breastfeeding activist. I feel like a home town celebrity! Also, a month ago, my neighbor came by to tell me that "that letter I wrote a few months ago was really good." And we're new here so I'm surprised she recognized it as being me.

It just goes to show that writing letters is so worth it. You never know who's going to notice or who it will help. The more positive press we can get published about breastfeeding, the better. Write good bfing letters every chance you get. Get published and help make a difference!

Here's the letter in case you ever want to use it:

February 13, 2004

Dear Editor:

I am writing this in response to the February 5th issue of the Bomber news. There was a small section which stated that all breastfed babies need a Vitamin D supplement. As a breastfeeding mother of a 7 month old and as someone who reads all that she can on the subject, I know this is not always true. The American Academy of Pediatrics released a statement stating that they recommend it, and though this is well-intentioned, it does not apply to all nursing babies. I would like to quote a media release from La Leche League, a breastfeeding support organization, regarding this subject:

"Exclusively breastfed healthy, full-term infants from birth to six months who have adequate exposure to sunlight are not at risk for developing vitamin D deficiency or rickets. Rickets occurs because of a deficiency in sunlight exposure, not because of a deficiency in human milk... Very few foods naturally contain significant amounts of vitamin D. The biologically normal and most common means of obtaining adequate levels of vitamin D for human beings, including infants, is through casual exposure of the skin to sunlight…"

In this sunny climate, infants receive a sufficient amount of sunlight simply from riding in the car for several minutes a day. It is my personal belief that statements about vitamin D supplementation and other such topics have been conjured up to make new moms feel that breastfeeding is complicated and imperfect, when in fact, it is just the opposite. Human breast milk contains all the nutrients babies need each day, plus many other substances that help promote optimal growth and development. It is the perfect food for babies. I strongly value the breastfeeding relationship I have with my daughter. We have such a strong bond and I hope that other mothers are able to experience the same thing. Please, no more confusing or negative press about breastfeeding.
Thank you,

Melissa S.
 

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Yay! I love it. I have written a few letters to mags on misinformation they printed that i thought I had written well and never got them published.
, Oh well. That will not stop me from my lactivism.
 
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