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my cat wil NOT STOP PEEING ON THINGS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!<br><br>
Let me say that I clean BOTH her litter boxes daily.<br>
If there is clothing, or anything resembling clothing on the floor, she will pee on it. I have 4 children, the laundry is never done, and despite my best efforts stuff still ends up on the floor.<br><br>
Lately I have managed to go through and keep everything off the floor before I go to bed, and there has been no peeing.<br><br>
Well we just set up the toddler bed for my youngest DS. And now she has decided, that this is her new litter box. I AM LIVID. I have had it.<br><br>
What can I do? She has 2 litter boxes that are cleaned daily.<br><br>
I have read every article about cat elimination, where litter boxes should be, I use a natural litter.<br><br>
if there is a blanket or rug on the floor that is laid out flat, she will not pee on it, if the blanket is scrunched up, or folded up, she will pee on it. DS bed was not made is that why she peed on it?<br><br>
I have to do more cleaning and laundry because of my cat, than my 4 children husband and myslef put together.<br><br>
She has been to a vet, and there is no apparent reason for the peeing. She is diabetic, but it is under control.<br><br>
The only thing I can think of is the kids bedrooms are on the second floor, and there is no litter box upstairs. Do i need to put a THIRD one up there? I really dont like the idea of a litter box in my kids bedrooms, but I dont want her peeing on the beds either.<br><br>
PLease someone help me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/help.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="help">
 

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Someone gave me this stuff <a href="http://www.catfaeries.com/feliway.html" target="_blank">Feliway</a><br>
but I just have kittens who are still learning to use the litter box so I haven't used it. I did use it when I first brought them home, to make them more comfy but I don't know if it worked because I had nothing to compare it to. They were comfy, but maybe they would have been anyway. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Good luck. My kittens have accidents (or on purposes) and I know how annoying it can be.
 

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We had some problems with our cats eliminating in areas they were not supposed to. One of the things that worked quite well for us, but is a pain, was to put food dishes (filled with food) in areas that were being eliminated at. It might be tricky, but can you put a food dish or two in your laundry area, right beside where clothes might end up on the floor? And add a food dish right beside your toddler's bed? (assuming your toddler will not eat from it)<br><br>
It's horrible when a cat starts doing that. I hope you find a solution!
 

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Just some thoughts.<br><br>
Do you have a blacklight/woodslamp? I'd treat any spots with nature's miracle to make sure all traces of the urine are gone. After things are dry, consider putting plates with some dry food on it where the pee used to be. A cat won't go there when they associate an area with food.<br><br>
Do you have covered pans? Some cats don't like covered pans and do better with uncovered.<br><br>
I'd consider having your kiddos keep their doors closed if they are going to continue to keep piles on the floor.<br><br>
One of my cats was like that...if we had papers on the floor, or crumpled clothes it was "fair game." Dirty clothes, with sweat (which contains some urea compounds apparently) might be preferable even. We kept the bedrooms off limits.<br><br>
Otherwise...one thing to ask, have there been any major changes in the household recently?<br><br>
If it were me, I would close off the bedroom, keep the rooms she access spotless and make sure any areas she's soiled are treated with Nature's miracle and have plates with food on them (at least for a couple of weeks).
 

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I have similar issues with our cat (pooping outside our bedroom door).<br><br>
The only thing that struck me was that there's no litter box upstairs. if your cat is older she may not be able to make it down to the litter boxes. Any way to block her from coming upstairs? Can you move one of the litterboxes upstairs (not necessarily buy a third).<br><br>
Other than that I'm tapped.
 

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Maybe the vet can prescribe some sort of anti-anxiety medication? If there is something going on that she is stressed about maybe that's why she peeing outside the box.
 

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i recall reading that crating was an option to retrain cats... i think it was thekimballs post???
 

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Yes, that's my soapbox. If you go to a shelter, you'll find those little mini "biographies" of the cats on their cages sometimes. I noticed that a bunch said, "my former family said I had trouble finding the litterbox, but I've never had a bit of trouble here at the SPCA!"<br><br>
That's because when a cat is confined in a small area, the natural instinct to not soil where they could possibly touch it or eat it comes back into play. In a home, all you're banking on is that the cat will prefer the litter to another surface--that's a pretty poor bet, for a lot of cats.<br><br>
By putting the cat in a single small room, or in extreme cases in a large dog crate with only enough space to sleep, eat, and use the box (like at a shelter), you start to retrain the habits of the cat. You keep them in the tiny area until they are absolutely reliable and have had no accidents for at least a week, then move to a very slightly larger area (the entire room, two rooms, whatever). You incrementally increase the area after the cat proves that it is ALWAYS returning to the box.
 

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Everyone beat me to the advice I was going to share!<br>
But just to re-emphasize--<br><br>
Make sure the old pee spots are truly clean<br><br>
Look into anxiolytic meds<br><br>
and<br><br>
retrain, only gradually allowing the cat out of a small room or area.
 

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Good points.<br><br>
After my cat had a bad bladder infection and was peeing everywhere, the other cats thought it was a game and took it up. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
So I just put some plug in air filters right near the areas where they would go, or moved something over the area (they only go near the wall on bare carpet). And it has stopped. Distract them and give them other options. I would switch litters and put another box upstairs.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>thekimballs</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6495929"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br>
By putting the cat in a single small room, or in extreme cases in a large dog crate with only enough space to sleep, eat, and use the box (like at a shelter), you start to retrain the habits of the cat. You keep them in the tiny area until they are absolutely reliable and have had no accidents for at least a week, then move to a very slightly larger area (the entire room, two rooms, whatever). You incrementally increase the area after the cat proves that it is ALWAYS returning to the box.</div>
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</tr></table></div>
<br>
What's really funny, is that nobody actually told me that before. But, I have done it in the past just accidentally on my own LOL. And, I can imagine that it would have the added benefit of breaking them out of their routine. Some cats, after urinating in an area just go back out of habit...isolating them like that would definitely stop that.
 

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Is your cat declawed? If so, how old is she?<br><br>
Declawed cats are more prone to developing arthritis in their paws at the declaw site, which can make it painful to perform the digging motion in the litterbox. If peeing in the litterbox hurts, the cat will seek elsewhere, hoping to find a less painful alternative.<br><br>
If she is declawed, I would look into trying some new brands of litter that may feel easier on her feet and I would talk to your vet about finding a medication that could help with any pain she might have in her paws.<br><br>
If she's not, then def. follow the confine and retrain advice. While you're confining her, make sure you clean up her "oops" spots with an enzymatic cleaner (as mentioned above).<br><br>
Good luck with your girl!<br><br>
~Julia
 

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You said that you use "natural" litter. What do you mean by that? Have you had probelms with this litter before, is it a new litter, or is this probelm always been around??<br><br>
When I got my first kitty, I bought that feline pine crap, cause I thought it was better, and she didn't have ANY IDEA what to do with it. She would NOT go in that box. It was KILLING me. Finally, someone suggested that I change litters, and she was IN LOVE! As soon as I changed the litter, she ran and jumped into the box, and rolled around and played for like fifteen minutes. No litterbox probelms after that.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Cersha</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6511767"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You said that you use "natural" litter. What do you mean by that? Have you had probelms with this litter before, is it a new litter, or is this probelm always been around??<br><br>
When I got my first kitty, I bought that feline pine crap, cause I thought it was better, and she didn't have ANY IDEA what to do with it. She would NOT go in that box. It was KILLING me. Finally, someone suggested that I change litters, and she was IN LOVE! As soon as I changed the litter, she ran and jumped into the box, and rolled around and played for like fifteen minutes. No litterbox probelms after that.</div>
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I have a cat that is the same way! He LOVES fine grained clumping litter and will NOT go on anything else (except the floor).
 

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I posted a thread about my own cat here <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?p=6522057#post6522057" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...57#post6522057</a><br><br>
I have tried retraining her many times but she always relapses <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> I just cant see keeping her in a room alone 23 out of 24 hours she is miserable and starts to loose weight and starts looking shabby. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Even when I let her out she still will use the floor during that time with me right there on occasion as I mentioned in my post. While in the room with the box's she has no accidents at all but as soon as she comes out here we go again.<br><br>
Every time I try to change litter things get a lot worse fast. Instead of just pooing every were she starts to pee as well. (all tho she is doing that now more and more anyway) *sigh* I have tried putting food in the spot were she was going the most but this cat will actually poo within a foot of her food bowl <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">: I swear I think her brain isnt wired right sometimes. That's what I get for naming her Stimpy I guess <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
On the rare occasion I have seen her use the box she actually keeps her front feet out of the litter and does the best she can to sit as close to the edge of the box as possible.<br><br>
Dont mean to highjack your thread OP I am just really ticked off at my cat right now if you read my thread you will see why. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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Mine was a rescue and had continuous UTIs for the first year and repeatedly peed on our couch to tell us he was hurting (this is what the doc said). We've put him on antibiotics, and he'd stop peeing for a couple of days, then he'd start up again.<br><br>
Doc recommended... hmmmm... how to spell this... amitryptiline??? Anyway, like Prozac for kitties. I had a hard time putting him on that, b/c DH and I don't take anything, why would I put my cat on meds? But it seemed to actually help after a while (since we'd tried the Feliway, and all the tricks to no avail).<br><br>
The trick for us... installing an insulated kitty door in the basement so he can go in and out... Never peed on anything again. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Some cats are just NOT indoor pets. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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