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Discussion Starter #1
Man, this has not been my week. Last Monday I was running around playing with a friend's rottweiler (like I do every time I go over there) and when I turned around, he nipped the back of my arm. It didn't break the skin, but it left a baseball-size purple bruise.<br><br>
Then, this weekend we went to visit family and I got bitten on the forearm by a wolf. (He was taken from the wild by a woman who thought she was rescuing him and then given to a relative of mine.) He was fighting a dog in their family over a female in heat. The two males had fought the day before and the wolf had won. I guess I felt protective of the injured dog, so when he ran away from the wolf, I grabbed the wolf to keep him from going after him. That was my mistake. He reached around and bit my arm. <a href="http://i159.photobucket.com/albums/t133/readingmama/BosBite.jpg" target="_blank">Here's</a> a picture taken a couple days after the bite. There's also some minor bruising and a tooth mark on the top of my arm, but there was only one puncture wound. At least he's had his shots. Tomorrow I'm going to get a tetanus shot. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:
 

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wow, I'm sorry. Why do people insist on keeping wild animals as pets? Would they consider turning him over to a wolf sanctuary? He at least should be neutered, I don't think I would keep an intact wolf around females in heat, particularly if there's other intact males running around. Come to think of it, the only way I would keep a wolf would be if he was kept in a separate, large pen, away from domesticated dogs, and children, and then only if I had the appropriate license to keep wild animals.<br><br>
Your doc will probably be required to report the bite to authorities, just so you know. Are there laws in your state against the ownership of wild/protected species? If so, your friends might get a visit. Don't let that stop you from getting checked out, though.<br><br>
Again, I'm so sorry you were injured. That looks like it hurts. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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You might want to research that tetanus shot -the risk from a dog bite is pretty much not there. Any bite needs special care to prevent infection in general, and to baby damaged tissues (the bruised muscle), but tetanus is a small concern and those shots hurt bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The bite happened in another state. The reason there are unneutered males around is because my family member breeds them. So he definitely would not send the wolf to a sanctuary. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"><br><br>
Here's my question: Is it ok for an animal to bite a person if the person did something wrong? After I was bitten, several of my family members said it wasn't the wolf's fault. They said it was my fault for grabbing him. I realize I shouldn't have grabbed him, but I think a big part of the problem is that there is more than one intact male around a female in heat. Plus, there are too many dogs and/or wolves in the house and yard (10 right now.) I don't know how much him being a wild-caught wolf factored into it because he's been with humans since he was little.<br><br>
I'll talk to my doctor about the need for a tetanus shot. When I got bitten by the rottweiler last week, she said if a bite breaks the skin, she recommends a tetanus shot if it's been more than 5 years since the last booster.
 

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It's not okay for DOMESTICATED animals to bite - even a if a human messes up. But the wolf is not domesticated. Doesn't matter how long he has been with humans.<br><br>
That bite looks like it hurts! Sorry that happened. I definitely wouldn't blame the wolf though because he still has wild instincts and you were trying to keep him from his potential mate or fighting a competing male for her. He treated you like he would have treated anyone else that tried to stop him from doing what nature is calling him to do.
 

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Ouch! So sorry about your bite!
 

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only about 20% of dog bites get infected (50 for cats). and tetanus isn't going to happen if it freely bled.<br><br>
i'm sorry your relatives are <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/censored.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="censored"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hammer.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hammer"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/banghead.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="banghead"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shake.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shake"> and shouldn't be around animals, let alone breeding more.<br><br>
we can recover from our savage bites together. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Did you get an alpaca bite, tiger tail?
 

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Ouch, that has to hurt! I believe the rottie probably got a little too carried away while playing with you (I know my family's dogs get crazy happy when I come over to see them, and light playful nips do happen), and the wolf did what was natural to him. He may have thought you were another dog trying to attack him since he was riled up when you grabbed him. Accidents can and do happen. It sounds like the wolf didn't try to continue to repeatedly bite you once he realized who you were, so that is a good thing.<br><br>
If the wound freely bled, I really would not worry about getting the tetanus shot. But, it is entirely up to you <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> . Just be sure to keep the puncture wound clean and prevent it from scabbing over until it heals from the inside out.
 

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I dont believe in any state is it legal to keep a purebreed wolf as a pet. I am sorry to hear about your bites.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, I decided to get the tetanus shot, mainly because I am immunosuppressed (with medications) for a chronic illness. With my immune system down like it is, I'd rather be safe than sorry. The shot itself didn't hurt. What hurt is all the muscle pain and spasming the next couple of days.<br><br>
I agree with you Zamber about the whys behind the bites. The wolf probably did think I was another dog jumping on him. After he bit me he ran off into the yard-probably freaked out. A couple hours later he came over and licked my hand. I forgive him. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> But I trust him less around my son. He is a wild animal and not a domesticated pet. So he will not be as predictable as you'd expect a dog to be. I guess I didn't understand that before.<br><br>
Here's what he's like (in case you're interested): He is very afraid of new people and people he doesn't see often. He goes and stays in another room when we go visit and avoids us for several hours. If we leave him alone and avoid eye contact (which scares him), he comes up to us and noses us on the hand. After that he is fine with us for the rest of the visit. He even comes up and pushes his head into us for scratches and hugs. He gets comfortable with my son quicker than with the adults. And he's really playful too. He loves to go after toys. That was a surprise. None of their dogs do that, but the wolf does! He's very serious. There is not a goofy bone in his body. When he plays, it's for the joy and exercise, not to please anyone. He will not go in or out a door if you are standing near it. He is stubborn and doesn't listen to anyone but my relative. Very different from a dog.<br><br>
I think you are right, Melda. And that is a great point Danemom. Really.
 
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