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Discussion Starter #1
she is 7 1/2.<br><br>
she had a tummy ache and generally didnt want to go to school so i kept her home. she was on me the whole time.<br><br>
then it was time for me to go to school, and she was acting up.<br><br>
she lashed out at me by mistake and that was the last straw.<br><br>
automatically i turned around and slapped her on the back.<br><br>
and it felt right. and i wasnt mortified for a long time.<br><br>
i was angry. i have a LOT on my plate right now and living on the edge.<br><br>
and i hit her. did not beat the crap out of her. didnt 'hit' her hard.<br><br>
however...<br><br>
i hit her - knowing how sensitive she is...<br><br>
... she took it hard. she just completely lost it and cried in a way she hasnt in a long, long time. threw up too. the hurt went deeper than the physical pain.<br><br>
teh worst. i wasnt upset the first few moments. i was able to drop her off to her dad's feeling i had done no wrong...<br><br>
... but now it hit me. there is no excuse. i am the parent. she felt unwanted. she felt 'like a piece of junk you want to throw away in the garbage'.<br><br>
is this the emotion she will carry for the rest of her life. that this one time the emotional pain was so great that she will always remember that she was beaten during her childhood. her dad of course is pissed at me.<br><br>
my poor baby doll. the one person who she trusted completely failed her today.<br><br>
even this morning i would have told you i could never do such a thing.<br><br>
and i did it.<br><br>
and i think we crossed a line... a line of growing up. dd is usually v. forgiving. when i see her in a couple of days i wonder if we will be able to bring this incident up and talk about it.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bawling.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bawl">:
 

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My dad never hit me as a kid.. except one time. I will never forget that one time, but I always think of it like "wow, just once?" My Stepmother beat the crap out of me, that sticks in my head way more then my dad slipping up and hitting me one time.<br><br>
Take it easy, we are not perfect, I would have a long talk to your dd, tell her how sorry you are, and why your sorry, and what you hope the two of you can get out of this, and be closer.<br><br>
Good Luck mama.
 

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Oh mama, forgive yourself. We ALL mess up. All the time. The difference between messing up and deliberately hurting your child (which you did NOT do) is what you do after the fact. Saying you are sorry and having a conversation about it will likely smooth everything out. Admit to her that you are human and that you have bad days too.<br><br>
I know my kids have the unique ability to make me more furious than any other people on the planet (how do they do that? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> It's always on days like you described, we're trying to rush out the door, they are whining, not listening, I am tired, etc. I have slipped up too in my quest to GD and I have felt that same in the moment feeling of "she deserved it!" and then later thinking about what I must have looked like and felt absolute shame. The only thing to do is apologize, talk to them about it, and tell them that you will work on it.<br><br>
I absolutely don't think that this will be the "thing" she remembers from her childhood, the thing that defines her childhood. She might remember it, but all of your fun times, love, support, and laughter will overwhelm this small incident. And having a mother who is willing to admit when she makes a mistake will be a far more important memory that she will carry.<br><br>
Forgive yourself mama, we all have bad days. This is totally fixable.
 

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If it is at all possible, I would try to reconnect with her before a few days pass. From your original post, it sounds like she is going to be at her dad's house for a few days and if it were me, I would really want her to know how much I love her and how I screwed up before too long passes.<br><br>
I am not a perfect parent by any means. I have done things that I am not proud of but I always admit my mistakes to my kids and we talk about how I should have/could have handled things. For me, keeping the communication open would be the key bit.<br><br>
Awhile back I had to slam my ds1's door in his face because I wanted to slap him so badly. I slammed it and walked away. I came back after I had cooled down, told him I was sorry and that I should have just told him I needed a minute and we soon laughed about it.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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I've done that too. Yes I felt bad but it seriously is a natural reaction. I elbowed my 18 month old in the head (not hard) because he bit me once. I didn't even think my brain just felt pain and reacted to stop the pain. Of course I felt awful about it, but really sometimes there are moments when you're preoccupied or just not thinking and you react before you have a chance to think about it. I seriously don't think she is going to be permanently scarred from it. I would call her at her Dad's and talk to her about it though, and apologise.
 

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I have a 7 year old. I know how it is. I do not think you have sccared her for life. Talk to her about it, apologize to her and let her know how you feel about the situation (kid friendly, of course). I am sure she , and you, will be ok. We all learn from our mistakes, that is the key.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
i did it at the worst possible time too. she is going thru a emotional growth spurt and is feeling things way too deeply, plus on top of that she was sick. so i couldnt have taken the worst possible time to do it.<br><br>
and now her dad's not picking up the phone. and i feel even more horrible. i feel like on a deeper level i betrayed her trust right when she is at her lowest point.<br><br>
i hope we can heal from this. my heart breaks for my little girl. i hope she was able to calm down and take a nap.<br><br>
i am happy though to see her dad's anger against me. shows his depth of emotion for his dd.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Talk to her? Tell her you know it was wrong of you to do that...help her understand.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>meemee</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15321115"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">i did it at the worst possible time too. she is going thru a emotional growth spurt and is feeling things way too deeply, plus on top of that she was sick. so i couldnt have taken the worst possible time to do it.<br><br>
and now her dad's not picking up the phone. and i feel even more horrible. i feel like on a deeper level i betrayed her trust right when she is at her lowest point.<br><br>
i hope we can heal from this. my heart breaks for my little girl. i hope she was able to calm down and take a nap.<br><br>
i am happy though to see her dad's anger against me. shows his depth of emotion for his dd.</div>
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Are you assuming he's not answering because of this? Don't jump to that conclusion if you don't know, it's not necessarily to do with you. And if it is, not talking to you about it is NOT a healthy way for him to handle it. We don't show "depth of emotion" by emoting, being explosive, or refusing to speak to someone.<br><br>
Can I suggest that before you have a conversation with her you feel her out? I think it is important to apologize to her, but I also think it's important to get your emotions in check. If she's calmed down and not totally freaked out, you don't want to make it a bigger deal than she remembers it by crying and scaring her.<br><br>
I'm sorry. It sounds like you guys just had a rough day.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
yup her dad was not picking up the phone coz he was pissed. it has happened before where he doesnt pick up the phone too many times not to recognise the pattern. and yes the way he can 'show emotion' to me is anger. even after being apart for over 6 years.<br><br>
dd finally called back. and i spoke to her. and we are both sad together but she is back to her old self. i told her i was still sad that it happened and then we talked about other things and she giggled. so she is back to her old self - or at least hasnt lost her sense of humor. hearing her giggle i knew things were going to be ok. she also said and asked for a couple of other things so i knew it would be ok.<br><br>
i am not crying or freaked out. i am just really sad that i discovered that part of me. i have been hysterical when dd got out of my sight when she was a toddler and i couldnt find her for what seemed like AGES.<br>
yeah we are both going thru rough times.
 

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meemee, when I saw this post and who posted it I thought "meemee? No way!"<br><br>
Honestly, I have been reading your posts for a long time and admire you. If it can happen to you, it really can happen to any of us. That's true for so many of these posts I read. The parents who post them are loving, searching, caring people and then one moment comes and here they are, posting about how they lost it. They are still those wonderful parents.<br><br>
It's amazing how fast the anger reaction can come. That scares me, even though I'm not normally what anyone would call an "angry person." Even yesterday, I was trying to brush dd's teeth and some little thing happened and she looked me right in the eye and deliberately stepped on my foot. I yelled at her and this tiny little scene became something ugly. Our relationship is normally really close and fun, like yours with your daughter. So, I did what I always do. Calmed down, apologized and looked within myself at what happened. What else can you do?
 

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As long as the good outweighs the bad you will be ok.<br><br>
Also, this time of year the upset tummy is often sinus drainage. My mom still calls me her hypocondrac <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> All due to her not understanding sinus issues.<br><br>
I also think it is OK for the phone not to be answered right away. You might be remorseful but she needs time to gather herself and calm down. No matter how fast you want to apologize sometimes you have to wait until they are ready to accept it.
 

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Oh, mamma! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/grouphug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="grouphug"><br><br>
I read so many of your posts and can tell how much you love your daughter and how much you are loved by her!<br>
We all have times that are less than admirable and we beat ourselves up the most for them....and sometimes we hurt the ones we love the most.<br><br>
It was an isolated incident during a highly stressful time. You know it wasn't the best reaction, but it happened and now it's just time to focus on reparing the damage.<br>
Thank goodness you and DD have such a close bond. While that bond may have made the mark pretty deep, such a bond will also will also bring you even closer when you show her that you can admit you did wrong, apologize and get the underlying stress out in the open. That shows honesty...turn it around as a teaching tool and lesson learned.<br><br>
I don't think you failed her. You showed her that none of us in infallible...we ALL have breaking points. We're all just simply human doing the best that we're capable of. It's a good thing to discover this side of ourselves....it makes us better in the long run as long as you use it next time to recognize that edge. That's the part too many people forget.<br><br>
I'm glad to read that your DD was giggling. Just ease into the subject when she gets back and I think you'll be ok.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">As long as the good outweighs the bad you will be ok.</td>
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This is a hugely important point to remember...and it seems like you tend to do very well at it.<br>
All kids are gonna go through very rough times, but as long as they have a parent that generally provides a loving, warm, and caring home/bond they tend to be awfully forgiving with our shortcomings.<br><br>
Love and Peace to you, mamma!
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MarCn</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15323885"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You can make it up to her in two ways, get some help with your anger so that she can control her anger and not hit her daughter when she's your age - AND never do it again.<br><br>
Seriously, you need to work on why you can't control yourself and what was really going on at the time, anger comes from fear - what are you afraid of?</div>
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This might be a little much. Anger does NOT necessarily come from fear. Anger comes from being stressed, from having too much to handle in a given moment, from reacting before we have the time and emotional space to fully think things out...<br><br>
I've heard people say on this forum that they don't understand how anyone could even WANT to hit their child. Uh, okay. I actually don't know anyone IRL who HASN'T WANTED to at least once. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"> Most of the time those feelings don't get acted upon, but when they do, it's not necessarily because of unresolved self-control issues. ETA: What I mean is, lashing out once doesn't mean you need anger management classes.<br><br>
OP, I think you have beaten yourself up about this quite enough. I'm glad you and your daughter talked it out. I doubt you will do it again because this was a TOUGH lesson. It sucks when we find out we're capable of actions we NEVER THOUGHT we'd take, though, isn't it?
 

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Any time I've ever lost it with my kids, I can look back at the situation and realize that it was all about me. So, if I'm about to lose it now, I'll look at what's going on with me before losing it. It helps a lot. They act up when I'm feeling like everything is piling up on me. Kids really do mirror. It helps to realize it's not their fault that they're acting up...Did they eat, sleep, are they sick, am I feeling upset and agitated?<br><br>
It sounds like you've got a lot going on. Hanging onto this isn't going to help you. Look at it for what it is, learn what you can and move on.
 

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I've done it before too... you are not alone.<br><br>
How is your relationship with her otherwise?<br><br>
The next time you see her, I would get down to her level, make eye contact, and tell her in a calm voice that you screwed up. You're sorry. No-one is perfect, even mommies, and you made a huge mistake. Tell her you love her, and there was no excuse for you hitting her like that. Say you're sorry again. Tell her what you should have done instead, and what you intend to do the next time you feel that way again.<br><br>
Immediately after, play a game with her to re-connect. (whatever game SHE wants to play). If she's not laughing and giggling by the end of it, then you are playing the wrong game.<br><br>
ETA: I said in my post that everyone makes mistakes (which is true), but I didn't say this: It's not only what you did when you made the mistake that counts... Possibly more important is what you do AFTERWARDS! Make sure that your daughter learns this lesson -- making mistakes is okay. Fix your mistake by talking to her face-to-face, letting her tell you her feelings (if she wants to), tell her you love her, and SHOW her that you love her and are sorry by spending extra special quality time with her.
 

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Closed pending review.
 

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Reopening and moving to the Gentle Discipline forum, since I am sure that is our goal here.<br><br>
Please remember that if someone posts in a manner that you believe to be against the UA, you should report it rather than engage another member in an on-board argument. Thanks!
 

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Hugs mama, we all do things we regret. I would tell her how sorry you are and how upset you were with yourself. I don't think it will scar her for life. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2">
 
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