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...on real food for mothers and babies, and I love it so far. Nina rocks my world! I love her writing style, her matter of fact attitude. She doesn't try to overload you with a lot of technical info, just keeps it basic and infinitely more accessible. I dig!
 

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oohh I want a copy! lol
 

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I got it about a month ago and read it cover to cover in a day and a half!!
I've been thinking that I should go back and read it more slowly to let it all sink in fully.

This is definitely a book that I will be recommending to all of my girlfriends.

Enjoy!
 

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I love "Real Food", I'm considering this though I don't currently have a baby... is it worth getting considering I'm not pregnant and have a 3 & 5 yo? I do plan to have another baby down the road...
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by BetsyPage View Post
I love "Real Food", I'm considering this though I don't currently have a baby... is it worth getting considering I'm not pregnant and have a 3 & 5 yo? I do plan to have another baby down the road...
If I were you, I'd get it. I'm about 2/3 of the way through now, and it's SUCH a good book!

I'm on her section on breastfeeding right now, and it's phenomenal. I really wish she'd come out with this book exactly a year earlier. My mind would have been so at ease on the subject. I think she's right-too much information can sometimes be detrimental, and I think that when I was having breastfeeding problems, I was reading too much about them too, which didn't help me relax at ALL.

I'm also going to be recommending/gifting her book to girlfriends. (I also got Real Food in my order and it's waiting on the shelf. Now I know I'll be kicking myself for not buying it ages ago!)
 

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Thanks everyone who commented in this thread. I just added it to my Amazon cart but wanted to know what you mamas thought first! Thanks so much!
: Now I'm gonna order it!
Wait! Quick question first - if you could only get ONE book would it be this one or 'Nourishing Traditions'?
TIA!
 

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I'm sure there's a lot of helpful information in the book, but I was really put off by the fact that she's started referring to Weston Price's X-Factor as "Vitamin K2." As I understand it, this is just a theory, based on one layperson's reading of the available literature (I was on the native-nutrition Yahoo group when this was being discussed a few years back). There are some interesting parallels, but it's hardly an open and shut case. When she presents this in such an unguarded way -- saying "researchers have finally identified..." -- it really diminishes her credibility as a source of reliable scientific information, IMO.

I'm not sure if she does this in the book or just on her web site, but either way, it's a concern. I've seen posts online in which people are talking about buying K2 supplements or eating other K2-rich foods, rather than taking the special butter oil, when in fact there's no solid evidence that this would be effective. Not that she's recommending this approach, AFAIK -- but given what she's written, it's not surprising. It would be a real shame if her enthusiasm turned out to be leading people astray.

(For those who are interested in the X-Factor/Activator X issue, I'd be very happy to discuss it elsewhere. I was really surprised when people started acting like "hey, mystery solved!," just because someone had written a somewhat convincing article. I'd guess that the guy who wrote the article was probably surprised by the reaction, too.)
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by witchypants View Post
thanks everyone who commented in this thread. I just added it to my amazon cart but wanted to know what you mamas thought first! Thanks so much!
: Now i'm gonna order it!
Wait! Quick question first - if you could only get one book would it be this one or 'nourishing traditions'?
Tia!

bump
 

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or if you had to choose between nina's 1st or 2nd book which would you get... I think I may get Nourishing Traditions either way.... unless someone advises against it.

Thank you!
~am
 

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I have her book _Real Food_, not the new one, but _Nourishing Traditions_, I think, is a MUST HAVE for any TF kitchen. And we are dairy and gluten free (there is lots of dairy in it, and all the baking/bread recipes contain gluten) and I still think it's the most informative, helpful book for how to prepare food in a TF manner, and why.

I say NT all the way!!!!


ETA: I also own _The Garden of Eating_, _Full Moon Feast_, _Wild Fermentation_, among others...NT is #1 IMO!
 

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I just finished it myself. Excellent book.
I did have two items I want to quibble with though. She mentions that rice has less gluten then wheat, when in fact rice does not contain gluten, and she also strongly advocates taking Brewers Yeast.
As far as I know, that has a fair amount of MSG in it.
I plan on checking into that one further.
If I am correct, I plan on making a note of it in the book, as I am loaning it out to quite a few people.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by PaulaJoAnne View Post
she also strongly advocates taking Brewers Yeast.
As far as I know, that has a fair amount of MSG in it.
I plan on checking into that one further.
I haven't finished the last chapter of the book yet, but changed the brand and dose of Brewer's Yeast I'm taking as a result of reading the pregnancy chapter. The brand she suggests (Lewis Labs) is GMO-free (unlike most instant yeast used for baking) and contains no MSG. This is a terrific supplement that has changed my mood and energy level drastically over just a week of taking it, so I wanted to say that it is not dangerous if it's from the right source.
 

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Rice actually does contain gluten, but a different kind.

Explanation here:

Quote:
When celiac patients talk about "gluten-free" or a "gluten-free diet," they are actually talking about food or a diet free of the harmful peptides from wheat, rye, barley, and (possibly) oats. This means eliminating virtually all foods made from these grains (e. g., food starch when it is prepared from wheat, and malt when it comes from barley) regardless of whether these foods contain gluten in the very strict sense. Thus, "gluten-free" has become shorthand for "foods that don't harm celiacs."
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by LionTigerBear View Post
Rice actually does contain gluten, but a different kind.

Explanation here:
I think I will still make a notation of that in the book though. She does not word it well, and since everyone that I will be loaning it to, knows I have Celiacs, it can save me the headache of explaining!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by hummingmom View Post
I'm sure there's a lot of helpful information in the book, but I was really put off by the fact that she's started referring to Weston Price's X-Factor as "Vitamin K2." As I understand it, this is just a theory, based on one layperson's reading of the available literature (I was on the native-nutrition Yahoo group when this was being discussed a few years back). There are some interesting parallels, but it's hardly an open and shut case. When she presents this in such an unguarded way -- saying "researchers have finally identified..." -- it really diminishes her credibility as a source of reliable scientific information, IMO.

I'm not sure if she does this in the book or just on her web site, but either way, it's a concern. I've seen posts online in which people are talking about buying K2 supplements or eating other K2-rich foods, rather than taking the special butter oil, when in fact there's no solid evidence that this would be effective. Not that she's recommending this approach, AFAIK -- but given what she's written, it's not surprising. It would be a real shame if her enthusiasm turned out to be leading people astray.

(For those who are interested in the X-Factor/Activator X issue, I'd be very happy to discuss it elsewhere. I was really surprised when people started acting like "hey, mystery solved!," just because someone had written a somewhat convincing article. I'd guess that the guy who wrote the article was probably surprised by the reaction, too.)
well the wapf website states the following on its home page:

"The Weston A. Price Foundation is a nonprofit, tax-exempt charity founded in 1999 to disseminate the research of nutrition pioneer Dr. Weston Price, whose studies of isolated nonindustrialized peoples established the parameters of human health and determined the optimum characteristics of human diets. Dr. Price's research demonstrated that humans achieve perfect physical form and perfect health generation after generation only when they consume nutrient-dense whole foods and the vital fat-soluble activators found exclusively in animal fats............

The Foundation seeks to establish a laboratory to test nutrient content of foods, particularly butter produced under various conditions; to conduct research into the "X Factor," discovered by Dr. Price (now believed to be vitamin K2); and to determine the effects of traditional preparation methods on nutrient content and availability in whole foods........"

so perhaps its the weston a price foundation that has led nina planck to believe that the x factor is k2.

paulajoanne- i too found it odd how she phrased the gluten in rice statement.

however, overall i think Real Food for Mother and Baby is an excellent book.
 
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