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<p>My seven year old daughter is gifted.  This has not been officially 'diagnosed' but it's clear to us.  And, yes, I know that sounds ridiculous from the outset, but here's how it is.  At 3 years, 4 months, she was reading---and not just memorizing books and reciting them.  She was sounding out words, sentences, and paragraphs.  At one point, before four years old, she told a woman in a store (correctly) that a sign was grammatically incorrect and that it should be fixed so as not to confuse customers. She's been doing math in her head since well before 4.  She was already reading science books and writing 'reports' before she started school 2 months short of 5 years old. </p>
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<p>When she was two, we sent her to 6 hours of daycare once a week so she could play with kids, and I could clean the house without her under foot. At three, she attended a preschool at a community college twice a week for 4 hours  day, for two semesters while I took a class.  We also attended LLL meetings, played in the park several times a week, and would have play dates with friends once or twice a month. </p>
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<p>We opted to put her into a public magnet school (after winning the school lottery) instead of home schooling because we believed she would be challenged by the second language and would also get much needed social interaction with other children. She turned 7 in late September.  She reads and writes in English at about a 5th-6th grade level.  Her handwriting is atrocious, but her grammar, sentence structure, and ability to get points across is amazing. Her Spanish speaking (after two years, 3 months of 90% immersion is amazing), and she reads and writes at a 4th grade level within the immersion program. </p>
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<p>Her homework is far too simple for her.  It takes her five minutes to do what takes her peers "hours of struggle" to complete. After she does her homework, I have her read an chapter book (yes the entire thing) in Spanish on odd days, and in English on even days.  Then we discuss the book. We also read science related books, watch Animal Planet or Discovery, read about history, talk about politics and social concerns. This is all in addition to school---but she craves it like oxygen. We also have memberships at every science museum and center in San Francisco Bay Area.</p>
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<p>Socially--she's just not on the same page as her peers.  She doesn't play the same games and isn't interested in the pop-culture stuff that seems so popular with kids--Hannah Montana, iCarly, etc. She doesn't want some Disney shows, but tends toward Handy Manny and Mickey Mouse Club (because she has a three year old sister, perhaps?). My friend says that her kids observed that she seems 'sad' at school.  I have not been able to understand what that means, but I do know that if there is nothing else interesting to her, she will find a book and read for hours. When I invite friends over--if they don't want to play Monopoly or something similar--she will read a book, and I end up entertaining her 'friend'. </p>
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<p>Sports-wise, she's just not very good at team games, or sports.  She has been doing ice skating lessons for a year (group classes, and not for competition, just for fun) and repeated the same level three times because she couldn't master one skill and since she is so accustomed to be great at EVERYTHING, she wasn't willing to try it. Soccer was a complete bust.  Swimming lessons we pointless, too, because she just didn't want to make an effort when she didn't excel right away. </p>
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<p>My husband and I have discussed this issue and considered our options.  We've found a socialization class that is offered in San Francisco and are willing to pay the high price if it will help her.  </p>
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<p>The day after we decided to make this socialization thing happen, there was an incident at school.  The kids were supposed to sit in a circle and go around.  When it was your turn, you were supposed to compliment someone. You were supposed to compliment someone who hadn't yet gotten a compliment.  It seems my daughter was unable to or refused to compliment someone.  This caused a scene.  My original reaction was to be frustrated with her, because she often chooses not to participate in activities, because they're hard.  Upon further discussion, I understand that she had thought up three things to say about three kids, and by the time it got to her turn, those kids had already gotten their nice comment. She didn't have anything nice to say about the remaining children (about which the other kids had nothing to say, either...).  So I kind of understand what happened here. </p>
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<p>But I digress--the teacher suggested that perhaps Arden should join a 'friends club' which is a group run by the school psychologist for 'kids like her'.  I don't know why this upset me so much.  I mean, we had discussed it THE NIGHT BEFORE.  But the fact that she's been singled out as someone who is causing a problem when she just doesn't want to give someone an insincere compliment because it's compliment time... ugh, I don't know.  I just lost it at that point. </p>
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<p>Now I'm questioning our school choices. Is she really getting anything from this school?  Have I caused her to be like this because she wasn't really exposed to a schooling environment and lots of kids in her younger years?  Should I be home schooling? Should I stop being a SAHM, get a job, put my younger one in day care (so she can be social), and pay $3000 a month for them to go to a private school, so they'll be more academically stimulated?  I'm so distraught.  At 7 (or 8) she can't be put into a 4th or 5th grade classroom, she would be completely outcast!</p>
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<p>At this point my husband is pushing for socialization classes, a couple of more social activities at the community center (jewelry making and creative writing, maybe?), and we have an appointment to see a psychologist next week so that she can explore her feelings about her experiences with someone who isn't as emotionally attached to the situation (my husband or me). I think we will let her do the social group at the school, but only if it doesn't make her feel like she's got more issues than she does.  The other social group is insanely expensive ($100+ a session), but might be better for her because it specifically excludes children with diagnosed medical or psychological problems which might confuse her even more about her 'differences'*. </p>
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<p>Does this make sense?  Am I crazy to think I should do something to change this situation?  Am I doing enough?</p>
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<p>*I am in no way disparaging children on the Autism spectrum, my sister is effected by Autism, but my daughter has already expressed a concern about how kids think she is weird or different, and I worry that if she's in a group with children with more severe social problems, she will begin to think that she has more issues than she already has.  Please don't flame me if I didn't word this correctly.</p>
 

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<p>Your DD sounds a lot like mine.  DD is 8, and generally scores in the 97-99% on standardized tests.  This is what we've done for her academically:</p>
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<p>1) She is attending school.  We used to homeschool, but for a number of reasons my kids are all now attending a small public charter school.  This is generally a good thing for them.  I can't say that the academics are necessarily more rigorous or challenging, but the assignments are more varied than they would've been if I was the only one teaching. </p>
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<p>2)  DD skipped a grade.  First she moved up a grade for math class, then for reading.  Eventually this year we decided to formally skip her a grade (she was technically a 2nd grader last year, this year she's in 4th grade).  In addition to this, the school has multi-grade classrooms, and DD goes to the 5th & 6th grade classroom during reading time.  While she reads at a high school level, the reading class has been challenging enough for her.  She is in need of the writing, grammar, and spelling instruction, and she is free to pick whatever books she likes for her independent reading projects. </p>
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<p>ETA: there haven't been any social issues with DD going to different classes.  She made friends quickly when she moved up one grade level.  Also, going to the 5th and 6th grade class for reading this year has been a non-issue.  However, I will say that this is a very small school (about 70 kids total K-6), and she knows all of the kids very well.  The school is very big on multi-age instruction; there is a K-6 homeroom time every day, and it's pretty common for kids to go to a different classroom for different subjects.  DD isn't the only 4th grader going to the 5th & 6th grade classroom for reading, and there are also 5th graders who go to the 3rd &4th grade classroom for reading time.  It's all very fluid.</p>
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<p>3) DD had similar social issues.  She can be very defiant at times and is also a bit of a know-it-all.  That said, she is able to make and keep friends.  I had actually talked with DD's teachers a year ago about DD joining a friendship group.  I viewed this as a positive opportunity for DD to learn some new social skills.  In the end, there wasn't room for DD in the group, but she's doing well.  Just going to school has been a great thing for DD.  She's had the opportunity to form much closer and better friendships with her school friends (who she sees all day every school day) than she ever did with her homeschool friends (who she saw a couple times a week for a few hours).</p>
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<p>ETA: Again, I think the fact that this is a small school helps tremendously.  DD's best friends are the other 4th grade girls at school (I think there are 5 total).  Also, I'd encourage you to think of your DD's teacher as suggesting the friendship group as a way to meet your DD's needs, not as a way of singling out your DD.</p>
 

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<p>First of all, huge hugs to you. It's really, really tough when your child doesn't fit.</p>
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<p>The social issues you mentioned can be more about personality and being young than something "wrong." When my DD was a baby, people really didn't like her. She was super serious and focused. She didn't smile much and hated strangers in her face. People used to come up to me in stores and tell me she was "disturbed." However, we knew what she was like at home... quirky yes but also warm, loving, compassionate and interactive. She's just extremely introverted... not shy mind you, just very, very private. When she was little, when she needed privacy, she needed it NOW and would do things like dissapear while opening Christmas presents to sit behind the sofa alone and go through stacks of books for 40 minutes straight. In 1st and 2nd grade, she would do things like walk by herself at recess or sit alone with a book in the reading corner during any free time. She wasn't sad... she just needed some time alone after sitting in a class full of kids for hours. She hated being forced into giving answers she wasn't prepared for... she wanted to think first but others never seemed to want to give her the time. Every year though, she got better at delaying those needs and compromising on the "quick answer" thing. She's 13 and in high school now and incredibly good at striking a balance between time that MUST be spent with others, time she WANTS to spend with others (and she most certainly does WANT to,) and time she needs to recharge her internal batteries. She's a leader. She's outgoing. She's a professional theatre actress in our county. Three things really made the difference socially for her: grade acceleration (even being the youngest, she always connects best to those that are oldest in the grade or in higher grades,) interest-based activities with kids who shared her passions even if not her ability and plain old time to grow up and mature. Now, I don't know your child or the severity you are dealing with but I can say that at least in our case, DD grew into quite a socially savy child and all we get are compliments now. Oh, and she could care less about current pop-culture. Thankfully, that's common amoungst theatre kids and so she fits right in.</p>
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<p>Academically, there are some things you can try. For my DD, we've used a combination of 1 full grade acceleration, additional subject accelerations in math and science, heavy in-class differentiation, GATE programs and extensive enrichment opportunities outside of school in her area of interests. For DS, we had the benefit of a late Fall birthday and so he started kindie at 4. We placed him in a trilingual school (Spanish immersion and Mandarin enrichment) that is already about 1 year advanced academically and has a substantial GATE program. He has a subject acceleration in math. I can't say the kids NEVER work below level but they are progressing and more importantly, happy and engaged in school. How much conversation have you had with the teachers and principal? What accomodations are in place now? Personally, I'd see how much you can get out of the current school before going private. The ones we talked to around here really couldn't offer more than the public school could. Yes, some started with higher academic standards but they still weren't going to be enough and the private schools were far less flexible than our neighborhood public schools. I was like you too... I didn't want to sacrifice my little ones chance to be home because I had to go back to work full-time to pay for a private school for the eldest.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter #4
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>annethcz</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1278881/i-need-help-with-decisions-about-school-long#post_16040025"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><p> </p>
<p>3) DD had similar social issues.  She can be very defiant at times and is also a bit of a know-it-all.  That said, she is able to make and keep friends.  I had actually talked with DD's teachers a year ago about DD joining a friendship group.  I viewed this as a positive opportunity for DD to learn some new social skills.  In the end, there wasn't room for DD in the group, but she's doing well.  Just going to school has been a great thing for DD.  She's had the opportunity to form much closer and better friendships with her school friends (who she sees all day every school day) than she ever did with her homeschool friends (who she saw a couple times a week for a few hours).</p>
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<p>ETA: Again, I think the fact that this is a small school helps tremendously.  DD's best friends are the other 4th grade girls at school (I think there are 5 total).  Also, I'd encourage you to think of your DD's teacher as suggesting the friendship group as a way to meet your DD's needs, not as a way of singling out your DD.</p>
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<p>Thank you so much for your input!  I've had a hard time accepting it as a 'friendship' group, and the teacher did suggest Girl Scouts before this group (we were actually in Daisies last night, because being the leader was not for me, because didn't care for the God inclusion in the pledge, but that's another issue entirely!).  I agree though, that she will likely benefit.  Our school also has these multi age classes--but don't have a 2/3 one this year for some reason.  I have composed a letter to the teachers (she has co-teachers who both have babies, so they only work part time), and am going to let it sit for 24 hours before re-writing it.  :)</p>
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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>whatsnextmom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1278881/i-need-help-with-decisions-about-school-long#post_16040104"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p> </p>
<p>Academically, there are some things you can try. For my DD, we've used a combination of 1 full grade acceleration, additional subject accelerations in math and science, heavy in-class differentiation, GATE programs and extensive enrichment opportunities outside of school in her area of interests. For DS, we had the benefit of a late Fall birthday and so he started kindie at 4. We placed him in a trilingual school (Spanish immersion and Mandarin enrichment) that is already about 1 year advanced academically and has a substantial GATE program. He has a subject acceleration in math. I can't say the kids NEVER work below level but they are progressing and more importantly, happy and engaged in school. How much conversation have you had with the teachers and principal? What accomodations are in place now? Personally, I'd see how much you can get out of the current school before going private. The ones we talked to around here really couldn't offer more than the public school could. Yes, some started with higher academic standards but they still weren't going to be enough and the private schools were far less flexible than our neighborhood public schools. I was like you too... I didn't want to sacrifice my little ones chance to be home because I had to go back to work full-time to pay for a private school for the eldest.</p>
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I've been looking at the private schools and they just offer a different whole education approach to their curriculum (I studied education in college, but decided to use my skills to be a good mom), which I think would be better for her.  But the cost is quite prohibitive.  We do have GATE programs in our district, but they do not have one at this school.  The Spanish immersion is top notch (they base other schools on ours), and I hate to give up her spot, and her sister's grandfathered spot, to move her to another school, you know?  I am going to speak to the teachers first about what we can do to increase her challenges at school, then maybe contact the reading specialist and the principal about acceleration--sooner, rather than later, but we are definitely going to proceed with the social stuff, too. </p>
 

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<p>Look at Nueva.  If I lived as close to there as you do, I'd be looking for ways to have my kid there.  I know several people who went there as kids.  They all had extraordinary elementary experiences.  (I grew up in the area)</p>
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<p>To get an appropriate placement for my DD required significant academic and cognitive testing.  We needed the results to determine the appropriate placement.  It turned out everyone (including us) had completely underestimated her abilities.  The testing was all done at the school eventually, and we were on the verge of getting it done privately when the school finally came through.  Had we done a private eval, we would also have wanted an evaluation of social, behavioral, and sensory issues.  However, once we got DD's academic needs finally satisfied at the end of second grade, the social issues evaporated. Things like what you are relating don't happen anymore. </p>
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<p>I wouldn't worry so much about social issues in an out-of-grade placement.  DD's in 5th grade math with gifted kids; gifted language arts with a group of 7 kids in grade; and in-class differentiation for just about everything else, and a classroom teacher who pushes DD hard on both her strengths and weaknesses.  Last year she was a teary, socially frozen child.  The math teacher told me yesterday that she has had to check her notes a few times about our meetings last spring -- she's not seeing the same kid.</p>
 

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<p>Consider a grade skip:</p>
<p><a href="http://www.nationdeceived.org" target="_blank">www.nationdeceived.org</a></p>
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<p>And on the "social" thing--it's easier to make friends with kids who are your mental age rather than merely your chronological age. </p>
<p>(In other words, we found a grade skip to be highly beneficial for our dd, socially as well as academically.)</p>
 

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<p>With my older sister, they did a grade skip. By the time I got to the same school, they had a much better giften and talented enrichment program and policy, so even though I didn't skip a grade, I was moved up for math instruction and sometimes reading too.</p>
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<p>You're already at an immersion school, so kudos.  It does sound like she needs something....'sensitivity' training? (not really, just can't think of the right word)  from what you described in the class complimenting exercise. Even though she may not like those kids, she still should be able to compliment them on SOMETHING...like "So and so combed their hair nice" or "I like so and so's purple shirt" or whatever. Also sounds like she is not the 'helping' type...unless you think she'd be interested in helping the teacher 'tutoring'  other classmates, or maybe being a 'buddy' to a younger student? Maybe she could get her own older buddy? To work on those areas she's advance in?</p>
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<p>And I really think you should find something you want her to learn (like swimming!) and have her stick to it, for a specified period of time or levels. If you always let her give up on something, she'll keep doing that, and you don't want her to learn that you can give up just because you don't like it, or it's hard (not easy), somethings in life you just have to keep working on! (failed driver's test, relationships! learning excel spreadsheets, whatever....) and she should learn she is not perfect or the best at everything, but she still has to try and make her best effort. And she may feel embarrased if she does want to swim at 15 or something and she doesn't know how, because she's the only old learner.</p>
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<p>Have you considered music lessons? And don't let her whimp out on that right away. At first kids want to learn, but then they don't want to practice, blah, blah...once I reached about 5th grade, I began to enjoy myself, challenge myself more...partly because I got out of chores if I was practiceing, but also partly because I matured and began to see it for it's own value.</p>
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<p>I hope you get a few ideas! Think about the ethics and morals you want her to learn now, and the best way to do that, not just the way she does or doesn't want to do that....someday she'll gow up and NOT be the gifted one (like college or high school) I used to be one of the best players in high school band, and once I go to college ( I chose a school with a conservatory, though I didn't major in music) compared to the music majors, I was nowhere near as good as them, struggling to keep up. So, band did not last longer than freshman year, but I still played for fun and was in choir. Anyway, my point is, someday she won't be the best at something and she needs a good framework on her self esteem and consideration for others to 'balance' her at those moments.</p>
 

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<p> I'd take the school psychologist up on the social skills class, but I'd hang on for the outside one until you figure out what's going on. I've got a bright, socially slightly awkward kid who's only so-so at sports. (A lot better after he had occupational therapy for his motor delays, but that's a different topic.) He's done 'Friendship Groups' at school 2x  -- once in 1st grade and again in 4th grade. In 1st grade, his teacher suggested it. In 4th, I did. He could probably get by without it, but I'm a firm believer in teaching skills that will make your life easier. However, ds doesn't need more help than that right now. He's got a tendency toward anxiety, but it's under control. His social skills aren't terrible, just a little 'young' for his age.</p>
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<p>My reason for waiting on the outside social skills group would be that you need to know what her issues are, <em>if any</em>, before you can know what kind of group is right for your daughter. A lot of social skills groups are aimed at children who need a lot of remedial help, and they wouldn't help your daughter much at all. Your daughter's 'issues' (if they are that) could be childhood depression, social anxiety, introversion (not something to be changed) or a whole host of things that I can't think of right now. Treatment for social anxiety, for example, might be different from social skills groups (which might make it worse!). It might also just be asynchronous development. The best description of asynchronous development I've heard came from my mom's description of our 6 year old dd this summer: "She reads at a 3rd grade level, she's got the emotional development of a 6 year old, and every once in a while, she reverts back to being 2."</p>
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<p>Others have given you good advice about the academics - she can be just fine if she skips a grade or is put with older kids for some part of the day. If the school is not differentiating instruction for her, it should be. If she's bored in school, that's not good.</p>
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<p>I'm also sensing a lot of panic in your post -- so the other thing I'd suggest is to think about your reaction: Why is it so worrisome for you that your daughter is struggling a bit socially? Having her be unable to perform in a group 'compliment' session doesn't seem to warrant giving up being a SAHM to put her in private school (that probably won't be able to meet her educational needs any better.) What's underlying your fear? I think you may need to separate out your fears from what's going on for your daughter.</p>
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<p>I'd be concerned about the messages that your sending your daughter. Are you unconsciously giving her the idea that she has to be good at everything? Or does that come from within? (Bright kids often are perfectionist.) If she's bright, she probably does crave information/learning. But is it necessary to mandate that she read <em>an entire chapter book</em> because her homework is too easy? If you gave her the choice, what would she choose to do? For my dd, often it is reading, but it's equally likely to be dancing or pretend play. For my ds, his reading is restricted to bedtime. He spends his daytime hours doing other creative things (playing animal baseball with his stuffed animals, pitching a ball against a backstop in the backyard). Yes, his homework is 'supposed' to take him 40 minutes (10 min per grade) and in reality it takes him about 10. So what? He's still reading 2-3 grade levels ahead, and he enjoys and understands what he reads. He reads for 30-50 minutes a night. (More if you count reading stuff on the ESPN website, which I don't.)</p>
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<p>Finally, I'd remind you gently: She's SEVEN. Don't forget that she's got the skills of a 7 year old, even if she thinks like an older child.</p>
 

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<p>She sounds a lot like my daughter.  She sounds like a really cool kid.  :)  My DD has some perfectionist tendencies and isn't great at sports but she does like sports. She also has a hard time socializing in class, she just doesn't totally click with the other girls.   So I can empathize.  Last year she was in a K/1 class and it was much better because she could interact with the then 1st graders.  But we do have a really high proportion of kids meeting our gifted criteria, actually about 50% in our class (!), so she does have peers as far as academics go.  She can be really hard on herself and will come home after playing with a bunch of friends on the playground and talk about how she doesn't have a friends.  Drives me batty.   She would probably love a social skills class.  But we're doing Girl Scouts and making sure she gets lots of time with friends outside school.  </p>
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<p>Does she say she's sad at school?  Just because she looks sad doesn't make it so.  You know your DD better than your friend watching her at school does.  And was she the only kid who couldn't think of a compliment?  That actually sounds like a pretty yucky task, sort of like being the last picked in kickball.  I honestly wouldn't put much stock in that.  </p>
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<p>One other thing, not all private schools are great with outlier kids.  The public schools here pay teachers better and have more enrichment programs for kids at all levels.  So I would do a lot of research.  The language option she has sounds truly amazing where she is.  </p>
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<p>What does the school say?  They must see that she's far ahead.  Do they advise a grade skip?  </p>
 

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<p>I have many thoughts but only a bit of time.</p>
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<p>First, I would have hated that circle time idea the teacher had. Even now if some perky person from HR demanded that of me, I'd balk and probably walk out. You are right, too, to point out that the other children didn't have anything nice to say to those kids either. I understand what the teacher was trying to do, but I don't think it was effective.</p>
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<p>Second, I have always had social "awkwardness" problems. My teacher recommended an eval for me when I was in 1st grade. In reality a grade skip should have been an option but was never on the table. The truth is, though, that I wasn't going to fit in with the other kids. Ever. I just wasn't, and no amount of socialization classes would have taught me what comes naturally to most people. Social interactions are like some secret code to me, even now, and I'm a well-adjusted adult in general. So I wouldn't be too big on the social skills group if I were you, but then it's just not that big of a deal for me for my children to be liked or have lots of friends. DS has finally made 1 friend, and it's another gifted child. They're 2 very cute little nerdy guys, and they're such a good pair! I'm glad for him, but it's not like he was lonely before he met W. I never was either, so I think you should discuss it with your daughter before you put her in a group like the one her teacher suggested. I would have been mortified if my mom had signed me up for something like that, and to be honest, I think it's just as likely that it could backfire as be successful.</p>
 

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<p>BTDT, still doing that.</p>
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<p>It is a challenge, isn't it?</p>
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<p>What did the counselor mean by kids like her? Learning social skills from kids who socialize just like you, well, won't teach you a thing! I am not going to ask someone who cannot read to teach my non reading child how to read!</p>
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<p>I do think it would be good if your daughter were more able to compliment someone. Did she say why she did not? Maybe she truly does not like the kids or she was shy or the compliment toward her was not so great?</p>
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<p>I am finding home schooling to be the only real solution for my children. I am starting to conclude that it is the only real solution for my older daughter too, who was home schooled but seems too advanced for the public schools, even the charter she is in. Ok, she does not just SEEM to advanced, she IS too advanced. It has been awful. I am about to make a post about that.</p>
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<p>So, maybe home schooling is worth a try. Or a charter school with a different emphasis. I don't know where you are or what is offered, but maybe she has other interests? How about something in the fine arts like music? Or science? Science and math and music often come hand in hand.</p>
 

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<p>I stopped and talked to the Monday teacher after school and expressed my concerns about the school not making plans for her educational level.  The teacher fully agreed with me and said that it's time to start thinking about what we'll be doing next year. The Directora (principal) got a note from her teachers today and pulled me aside to talk.  We are going to have a meeting with her kindergarten, first grade, and current teachers, along with the principal.  I'm not entirely certain what was contained in the e-mail from her teachers, but the director asked how old she is, and when I told her she just turned seven she said, "Wow, just wow."</p>
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<p>The school does have a 3rd/4th class planned for next year.  Normally there is absolutely not asking for specific classes for your child, but I think that we may be able to place her in this class next year.  Although, this class will likely have 4th grade students who need a bit more time to catch up to their peers, so I'm not sure, and I need to ask about that. Our other options include testing her for the GATE program, but there is no gifted program at our school, so she would have to move to another school.  This is not optimal for us, since she really loves her school, it's close knit, and we would also like her sister to attend the immersion program.</p>
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<p>It's all still in the air, and we have no yet had this meeting, but I'm starting to think that the school is willing to help us, and that I didn't actually ask for help, because I agreed that although she's brilliant, emotionally, she's still just a 6-7 year old girl.</p>
<p>(talk about a run-on sentence!).</p>
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<p>I'll update more as the situation develops. </p>
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<p>Also---I had expressed to the teacher that the reading books she brings home for her daily homework was a joke in terms of her reading level.  Today, she brought home a 30 page book filled with pages like this:</p>
<p><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.mothering.com/community/content/type/61/id/439210/width/1000/height/800/flags/" target="_blank"><img alt="75795_1722469582613_1264548434_31918418_1419413_n.jpg" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="15405" data-type="61" height="500" src="http://www.mothering.com/community/content/type/61/id/15405/width/375/height/500" style="; width: 375px; height: 500px;" width="375"></a></p>
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<p>She read the book in 10 minutes, and told me about the characters, the problem, possible solutions, and the resolution to the problem. </p>
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<p>This child blows my mind every day!</p>
 
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