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I just looked up all the milestones for age four, and while my son is just three months shy of four... he has already surpassed many of the milestones. He can do puzzles that are for ages 5-9, with ease including computer mazes. He whizzes through any game on his learning game on the highest levels- even though the recommended ages are typically 4-9. He can count in Spanish, say the alphabet in German, and now can read multi-syllable words. He has been able to read most dr. suess books for a while now, and started by memorizing before sounding out. His vocabulary has always been pretty extensive, and he was speaking early...especially for a boy. He can do some math, and even looks up 'Fisher Price' in the "search engine using the browser" as he says, and starts shopping for toys entirely on his own. He can also write words pretty well and is able to complete the first and second grade assignments we print out.

I feel like I have a three year old teenager, and the extent of his curiosity is going to be a challenge, I can already tell... He also seems to have some understanding of things like death, even though he has not lost anyone. He says he worries about something happening to my husband and I, etc. and is incredibly sensitive. He voices feelings I didn't know a three year old could have, such as worrying that nobody will like him, etc (even though he is pretty well liked and very social). He can be as strategic and defiant when it comes to getting out of chores as a young adult. When it comes to things like 'catching a ball' however, he is not as advanced and is more likely to watch it fly past him.

I don't really know what to do, but I don't think conventional schooling is the answer for this one. My first instinct is to feed the curiosity by teaching him at the level he is at, but will that pose problems? I know some cultures recommend slowing things down and pacing your child, but I really feel it would be better to keep him challenged.

Also, I am wondering if there is a way to have him assessed so I can take care to work with him at the level he is at. I truly believe that kids grow up at different rates and that I should cater to that. I know that is pretty much the opposite methodologies that high scoring schools in countries like Denmark, etc suggest.

Any suggestions are greatly appreciated!
 

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I guess my first suggestion is to spend some time reading through threads in this forum. There are a lot of conversations about the issues you describe, including emotional sensitivities. The search function is very helpful if you have specific concerns.

It's a little early to dismiss conventional schooling out of hand. I've found that school suitability depends as much on the child's emotional nature (and the parents' too, actually) as it does on academic ability. A lot will depend on the schools available in your area. I'm not sure if you are suggesting that you'd like to homeschool, which is often a good choice. You'll find lots of helpful information in the Learning At Home subforum.

I wouldn't worry about "teaching him at the level he's at" if you follow his interests and provide him with access to resources to support those interests. There are many, many threads about the advantages of learning through play for pre-schoolers and the appropriate activities for children this age. Ultimately, it will all boil down to the individual needs and quirks of your ds.
 

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Don't worry about Denmark lol. Their general population tests better but the gifted population I've conversed with from there is routinely unhappy because of the negative attitude towards kids who are advanced on their own.

I really don't think you need to worry yet. He's a little guy. Certainly, do some research on possible schools and I agree with PP that it's too early to rule it out. There can be lots of options and always a large range in abilities within every class. My own two are in public schools and thriving though they're both high on the gifted scale.

Just let him take the lead. He'll let you know what he's interested in. Let his interest ebb and flow.
 

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He sounds like a cool little kid! I so know some of those things. Don't worry about teaching on his level vs avoiding academics in the early years-- just follow his lead and it'll be right. I was all set to be very laid back but dd demands so much and always has, but I think it's best to just keep meeting her needs.
 
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