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I am really frustrated right now. DD is almost 3 and dh and I really want to homeschool. Amid all the other obstacles,i.e. grandparents, money etc. I frequently run into my own insecurities. What I have noticed a lot (but I NEVER show it) is that I frequently underestimate my daughter's abilities. Even when she was three months old, I didn't think she would grab for toys yet and my mom had her for 15 minutes and got her completely interested and grabbing for a little frog mirror. It's only worse (for me) now that she's older. Her verbal skills are coming (though she was a very late talker) but I find myself thinking a lot "she's not ready for that," "she won't grasp that yet"

So then, I think to myself, if I'm mom and we're together 24-7 and I'm supposed to know her best, how come I feel like I have no idea where she is developmentally and what she is capeable of? What the heck kind of homeschooling mom would I be? Maybe a preschool teacher really could teach her better.

But then I come back to reality and know that traditional schooling will only damage my child. I was an education major in college for 3 years and can tell you first hand they don't teach you ANYTHING about how to tune in to children and REALLY guide them/teach them/inspire them etc. Of course a homeschooling friend of mine always tells me, "well that's ok, kids will do it for themselves anyway".

any advice? How can I stop underestimating my dd? I don't want to give her more than she can handle either.

Sarah
 

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Children are amazing, aren't they? My kids surprise me all the time. I'll ask dh, "Did you know that ds1 does xyz?!" and he'll say, "I had no idea either!". It makes it kind of exciting, I think, to continually discover (and even underestimate) what they are capable of. It's a process; they continually progress and surprise us.

My humble advice, especially based on her young age, is to read to your dd, talk to her, take her places, give her room to explore and follow her cues.
 

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I can understand completely what you are saying. I have had the same epiphany several times over.

For me, the best thing I can do is trust them when they believe they can do something, or want to try something.

Case in point- several months ago I was on a sewing jag. They wanted to sew. I really didn't think they could or would do anything meaningful. I mean, they don't even have the patience to do a lacing card. But I let them try to sew. They did awesome! We made hats, purses, Christmas stockings, gnomes, doll clothes, flags- and they were so proud. And, because many of these were "functional" items, they not only could meaningfully use what they had made, they could also see the realities of not being patient or following directions (ie- if you sew any old way across a purse, it's really hard to put things in it!).

A friend of mind is an awesome homeschooling mama. She always lets her kids do as much as they possibly can on their own, and then steps in and adds the finishing touches. I want to learn to be more like her!
 

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Reading your post I remember the day when I realized that I didn't have to stay one step ahead of my dd at all times, it was too exhausting! Then I just started being more sensitive about noticing patterns in her, like if she was interested in one type of thing we would explore it in different ways like painting for example-we used all different kind of paint, then painted all different kinds of surfaces,etc. Same thing with math, story themes, nature, etc.

I think their worlds open up wide for them and they absorb so much information from so many places one couldn't possibly keep track of it all.

For advice I would just say to go with something that interests her, but when she loses interest stop even if she loses interest for 6 months. I know for me personally my best learning comes from exploring something I am interested in at my own pace, in my own way. If you are worried about pushing her too much you might be too focused on a "goal" rather than an "exploration". I also wouldn't sweat not feeling "on top" of anything, there is no proof that learning something early is more beneficial, and may even be damaging.

I'm sure there are plenty of things you just know about her that you take for granted! Try not to worry about it right now, I'm sure you are very sensitive to her!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by mamatoady
So then, I think to myself, if I'm mom and we're together 24-7 and I'm supposed to know her best, how come I feel like I have no idea where she is developmentally and what she is capeable of? What the heck kind of homeschooling mom would I be? Maybe a preschool teacher really could teach her better.

But then I come back to reality and know that traditional schooling will only damage my child. I was an education major in college for 3 years and can tell you first hand they don't teach you ANYTHING about how to tune in to children and REALLY guide them/teach them/inspire them etc. Of course a homeschooling friend of mine always tells me, "well that's ok, kids will do it for themselves anyway".

Any advice?
Yes - listen to your friend. She might not be articulating it to any great extent, but she's saying a lot.


Your daughter will let you know when she's ready for what - because you'll see her learning on her own. You just need to pay attention and listen to her. You won't need to be worrying about what to teach her - you'll be watching her learn as you expose her to all sorts of things.

And here's an article that has a lot of ideas for things you can do with her:
Pre-school and kindergarten
 
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