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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2 year old DD is allergic to cats. My mom has cats, and she goes there alot, sometimes overnight. I notice she mouth breaths alot afterword, but she is not one to get emididate runny nose, itchy/watery eyes, caugh, etc...so I think her allergies to them may be less severe then we orriginally thought. (she has food allergies as well, wich turned out to be most of the porblems we had). Anyways, she is AWESOME with animals. Really good with my moms cats, and I love cats and have grown up with them. When DD was first born, I didn't mind not having a pet, but now I am really missing my kitty time. I think a Sphynx would be a good option for us. We have been researching them online, and I am falling in love with them and REALLY want one. I know some people are allergic to the saliva and skin, but these kitties need rutine baths as well as not having the hair, so I would hope this would keep some allergic reactions at bay. We will deffinately visit a cattery before we purchase, but they are all a long drive. So here are my questions,<br>
1) does anyone have, or know someone who has allergies to cats, but deals well with hairless cats?<br>
2) does anyone own, or know someone who owns a Sphynx and has good or bad things to say about them?<br>
3) does anyone know a better way to find a local Sphynx cat. (we are having a hard, doesn't have to be a kitten) we live in Minnesota by the way.<br><br>
TIA....I really hope some people on here have experience, thoughts, advice, whatever, all opinions are welcome....Thanx.
 

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I'm actually a persian person, but I know sphynx people and I would say that the best place to start would be at a cat show. I'd go there first, you will find some sphynx people there, and you'll be able to ask questions about the breed.<br><br>
As far as non-allergic. They're just as allergic as a persian or any other cat breed. However, they do require weekly bathing, which is quick. Since they don't have the hair to wick away the oils from their skin they need to be bathed as they get dirty and greasy really quickly. You'll probably start off once a week, then depending on the cat (some are more greasy than others) you can adjust. Though, they'd be a MUCH quicker dry than a persian indeed (my drying time is about 40 minutes here even with my professional for my 'medium coated' cats...not in full coat right now).<br><br>
They do feel really neat though. I handled my first sphynx back last fall when I was assistant clerking at a cat show and the exhibitor was disabled and needed help getting her cat from the cage.<br><br>
They sort of felt like a warm peach...LOL...
 

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Someone somewhere has engineered a non-allergenic cat. It's very pretty, white with blue eyes. Run a google search. They aren't cheap, but neither is a purebred Sphynx.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>heartmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10804912"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Someone somewhere has engineered a non-allergenic cat. It's very pretty, white with blue eyes. Run a google search. They aren't cheap, but neither is a purebred Sphynx.</div>
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<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allerca" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allerca</a><br><br>
Somehow there seems to be some controversy with the claims that allerca has made.<br><br>
Either way (don't know about those) if money is a factor if she was interested in adopting an older sphynx, usually breeders are using for good homes to place their retirees in as well. Usually you'll find they only charge for the spay/neuter/vet visit.<br><br>
Most people seem to be interested in kittens for some reason. (I've always adopted adults personally as it's nice to know their personality up front.)
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>heartmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10804912"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Someone somewhere has engineered a non-allergenic cat. It's very pretty, white with blue eyes. Run a google search. They aren't cheap, but neither is a purebred Sphynx.</div>
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And they're not deaf?
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>skyastara</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10805234"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">And they're not deaf?</div>
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The allerca cats are in all colors, she's just talking about an example that she saw. For the white litters that I raised i had three blue eyed white persians, and ALL of them were sound hearing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> You can do it, you need to know your genetics and bloodlines and make a commitment to breeding sound hearing cats. Most cat breeders I knew though go for type exclusively and don't care whether they can hear or not.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>phatchristy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10804824"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
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They sort of felt like a warm peach...LOL...</div>
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That is sort of creepy. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
All I can think of when someone mentions a Sphinx is "Mr. Bigglesworth" from Austin Powers. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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What Christy said is right--they're JUST as allergenic as any other cat breed; the only difference is the frequent bathing. So you can honestly do just as well with another cat as long as you bathed weekly. Now if you want a Sphynx for all the other cool things it is and does, that's great and I think you should get one, but don't do it for the allergy issues.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>thekimballs</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10805521"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">What Christy said is right--they're JUST as allergenic as any other cat breed; the only difference is the frequent bathing. So you can honestly do just as well with another cat as long as you bathed weekly. Now if you want a Sphynx for all the other cool things it is and does, that's great and I think you should get one, but don't do it for the allergy issues.</div>
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The difference here would mainly be in the "dry", you wouldn't have to blow them dry. However a lot of other shorthaired breeds you don't blow dry for show anyhow interestingly enough...<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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Oh, and for personalities, they have great personalities like most cats breeds.<br><br>
I honestly had thought about them (for the exhibition purpose) however I have to say DH in particular was rather freaked out by the look. And who blames him (my siggy has my cats pictures).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
wow, thanx for all your replys. Interesting conversation going on here. To answer some of your questions/comments:<br>
1) I was originally interested in the breed for the allergenic reasons, but after researching them, have come to really like the breed for its uniqueness, personality traits, good health genes, etc.<br>
2) I have heard that some people are allergic to the dander, and some are allergic to D1 wich is found in skin, saliva, hair, etc. I don't know how much I can believe that a hairless cat wouldn't be easier to live with if you have allergies. The hair that sheds carries with it dander, skin cells, saliva, and all of that. With a hairless cat, your clothes, and furniture are not all covered with the hair. So you are more or less just dealing with the cat itself. I also believe that some people are just allergic to the dander. In that case, the dander in a hairless cat is minimal, and what is there is washed away by weekly baths. My DD has less severe reactions when my mom makes sure to vacume the house and furniture well, and brush the cats. This has allways been my experince with people with allergies. Also, I think most people grow out of animal allergies when they live with that animal. (I just wouldn't want to put DD threw the agony).<br>
3) I looked into the Allerca cats, and there was deffinately some contraversy on the subject. They are around $4,000, and a Sphynx is around $1,000. So they are signifacantly more expensive, and chances are they would be harder to resell for that price if we had to. (if DD was still allergic).<br>
4) The Mr. Bigglesworth thing brings up a good topic for me. In tv alot these cats are represented as mean, or weird, but in reality they are such nice cats. I agree some look, um, well, kinda spooky. My husband and I are looking at the darker colored ones. I think they look less creepy, and honestly I think they are really cute. Unique, yes, but cute.<br><br>
Thanx again for the responses, keep em coming.
 

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A Sphynx is going to be just as allergenic as any other cat. I am also allergic, although not severely. My cousin has two little Sphynx girls, and they bother me about as much as any other cat, even with weekly bathing. I have a Devon Rex and while I do get stuffed up a little if he's right up in my face a lot, for the most part I can tolerate him better than the Sphynx. Not sure why...<br><br>
You might want to check into a Siberian cat...even though they are long-haired, they apparently lack the protein in their saliva that most people are allergic to, so many people even with severe allergies have been able to live with them without problems. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I've also heard that cats on an exclusively raw diet may not trigger allergies. It makes a certain amount of sense to me that a very different diet would result in different protein secretion. We haven't tried it here (my cat's quite old, and I can't imagine her getting used to a whole different diet), but if I can substantiate it in any way, we might get another cat down the line and raise him/her on a raw diet. (DH is allergic, and DS seems like maybe he's just developing an allergy to our cat too :-/.)
 

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As much as I'd love to find another benefit of raw, I doubt this would be one. What people are allergic to is a protein made by the cat--every living animal makes proteins out of the amino acids they consume. So even if what they're consuming is low quality, they will make their proteins. Where a good diet may make a difference is when people have more of a physical sensitivity than a protein allergy--where they are very sensitive to the feeling of hair or dust in their noses or lungs, but are not histamine-allergic to the cat protein. A raw-fed cat will shed less, so would put less into the air.
 

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My DH is always allergic to new pets until he gets used to them. Whenever we get a new pet or go stay with someone that has pets he takes bioallers pet allergy relief <a href="http://www.drugstore.com/qxp33801_334918_sespider/bioallers/animal_hair_and_dander_allergy_relief_liquid.htm" target="_blank">http://www.drugstore.com/qxp33801_33...ief_liquid.htm</a><br><br>
It really works and after a while he doesn't need it anymore and becomes immune to the pet. I don't think your DD is old enough to take it but maybe when she gets older.
 

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It's one of those things as well, reducing the allergans in the house can really help as well. Do you know what else she is allergic to? Our pediatrician has stated that some basic things to reduce allergans:<br><br>
Eliminate use of carpets completely (prefereably) or vacuum with a high quality hepa filter containing vacuum.<br><br>
Wash bed linens each week in hot water, use dust mite blocking pillow covers.<br><br>
Wash pet at least one time every two weeks.<br><br>
Do not allow pet in bedrooms.<br><br>
Honestly, I don't really follow those rules, except for the bathing LOL. If my kids had physical signs of allergies then I would do more. We do have primarily tile actually. By accident the lab once did the wrong blood panel on my DD, and came up with some sensitivities. And, cats/dust mites were on the list. But, really LOW. The big issue is whether or not they are exhibiting physical symptoms. I have a feeling I am mildly allergic to cats. As in, if I handle one that has not been bathed in a while I need to wash my hands afterwards. In the past I have shaved some that haven't been recently bathed and have gotten the itchy eyes/more nasal discharge than usual.<br><br>
However, I grew up in a home that was very dusty. Really old carpets and likely was exposed to a lot of dust mites/allergans.<br><br>
Which I seemed to turn out really well. No daily allergies/asthma. Maybe being exposed to that much young has helped me as I got older. I don't know.<br><br>
DH's family, his mom bleaches out everything and overdoes the cleaning. Both have developed serious allergies, and his dad just last year (in his late 50s) has developed asthma. I wouldn't doubt the freakishy clean environment has caused it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll">
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
<b>Aurinia</b> Thanx for the suggestion on the Siberian cat, I will look into that.<br><br><b>Ironica</b> At this point, anything I can do to keep things 'at bay' I will do. So the raw food diet is deffinately in the running.<br><br><br><b>Thekimballs</b> The sensitivity you are talking about, versus the allergy to the protein, is exactly my conflict. I don't want to do anymore tests on DD, but I do want to find out what it is that is bothering her about the cats.<br><br><b>Tankgirlhi</b> Thanx for the link. DD has some general allergy medicine that her ENT doc suggested to take every day. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"> ya, we don't do that. But we have used it when she is heading to a 'allergy prone' invironement. It seems to reduce the effects a bit.<br><br><b>PhatChristy</b> Good points about the other allergens in the house. We do some of those things allready. She has allways been very sensitive. We have delt with eczema in her very bad. Since she started eating solids, she threw up all the time, was sick alot, and allways covered in a rash, and night waking from mouth breething and sleep apnia. We found out she is allergic to peanuts and eggs, (and cats). I assumed she was allergic to dust mites and such, but the screening for that came back negetive. After cutting out all peanut and egg related foods, her allergies got dramatically better. I mean night and day. (and they say eczema isnt' food allergy related, ha). Anyways, sorry to ramble. But end point is that we have come a long way with her, and now she tollerates my moms cats pretty well. She is no where near severe in my mind. I have seen people walk into a room with cats and emediately have to leave it. But she can stay there overnight and not seem botherd until the very end.<br><br>
We have an appointment with a cattery somewhat neer our home. We will visit her cats and let DD play with them and pet them and what not and see what happends. I think at this point that is all we have left to do.<br><br>
If this doesn't work, does anyone have any suggestions on a good pet that won't produce allergies. I am assuming she is going to be allergic to most animals. I looked into snakes and lizards, but they are suprisingly hard to take care of. Any other suggestions? Just for backup, thanx.
 

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Just to chime in really quickly; I just did some research for a friend whose daughter is allergic to cats:<br><br>
As mentioned earlier, Siberian cats are known to have a very low occurence of the protein that causes the allergies. Abyssinian cats do as well, slightly higher than the Siberian breed but still low. And they're overflowing with playfulness!<br><br>
Good luck in your cat quest!
 
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