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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I love so many different aspects of so many curriculums but don't really want to commit to one.

I want to do our own thing...follow the childrens' interests but still kind of stay around the same level as the schools.

If I bought "what your first grader needs to know" -Core knowledge, or something like that, would that be enough to base my curriculum on?

I really like the Oak Meadow stuff, but some of "The well trained mind" appeals too.

TIA

 

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I like Rebecca Rupp's Home Learning Year By Year. It's pretty relaxed, gives resource suggestions and seems most closely aligned with what might be happening in schools without being tied to it iykwim. It seems to follow history fairly close to chronologically (iirc).

I use a combo of resources (Rupp, Ambelside, provincial curriculum, Core Knowledge) to put together a rough outline of things we might do each year but if there is a chance to follow an interest or opportunity we are happy to do that instead of and for as long as it takes. I use the checklist after the fact for things like math. For many of the other topics (ie history and science), its interesting to me how much comes up 'organically' in the course of day to day living. The outline helps me know some of the resources and concepts we could explore when the topics come up but we aren't tied to it.

I really liked this series of blog posts about classical unschooling It might give you some ideas about integrating the approaches you like with following your kids' interests.

HTH
Karen
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by lisa72 View Post
If I bought "what your first grader needs to know" -Core knowledge, or something like that, would that be enough to base my curriculum on?
I think that would be plenty, really, but I'd add things like just always reading books, going on field trips, doing story time at the library, following interests, adding in some type of sports classes, art classes perhaps, visits to a children's science museum, fun educational stuff to round it all out and keep the learning incredibly fun. You could always borrow things from Oak Meadow (if you have access) and the Well Trained Mind whenever you want to.

By the way, how old is your child, first grade??
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by RiverSky View Post
I think that would be plenty, really, but I'd add things like just always reading books, going on field trips, doing story time at the library, following interests, adding in some type of sports classes, art classes perhaps, visits to a children's science museum, fun educational stuff to round it all out and keep the learning incredibly fun. You could always borrow things from Oak Meadow (if you have access) and the Well Trained Mind whenever you want to.

By the way, how old is your child, first grade??
Thanks everyone for the replies


My ds is 5. In Canada he would be in kindergarten right now, starting first grade next Sept. Here, he would start kindergarten next Sept.

We will end up back in Canada eventually.

I'm not sure when to start all this - he seems ready for some things but not for others, ie he knows all about the esophagus and trachea, Loves everything to do with the human body, but shows no interest in learning to read.

I'm kind of hoping he'll give me some signs along the way.

I was looking at the kindergarten curriculum on Lillians website and we have been doing that for a while. I'd really like to just keep on going how we are.

Rebecca Rupp's Home Learning Year By Year is on my book list.
 

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Get thee to the FUN-Books website! They have the best of the best stuff - very carefully chosen by the homeschooling family that runs it. It was formerly the Growing Without Schooling catalog.


I would agree with Karen on Rebecca Rupp's book, Home Learning Year By Year - but keep in mind that she meant it only as a very loose guideline, and not at all as a "should" list. Another good book is Books To Build On: A Grade-by-Grade Resource Guide for Parents and Teachers, by E. D. Hirsch - a 350-page guidebook to interesting books and resources for enriching learning categorized by subject, through 6th grade.

And also keep in mind that it's ultimately your children - not outside opinions - that will determine the best path or paths. It's next to impossible to be able to plan it out for them in advance. So it's best - and a lot cheaper - to wait as long as possible at each step to see how they learn best and with the most enthusiasm, and what kinds of things they're most drawn to. You definitely don't need to buy much, as has already been pointed out in this thread.


-Lillian
 

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We are kind of "classical" and "eclectic" unschoolers around here.
My oldest is only 5, so we have just begun this journey. I like to give him as much choice as possible in terms of choosing what he wants to learn and when. But, I also like to initiate activities and fun stuff that revolve around a simple time-line/structure of my own. So, the goal here is to do a little of both. For Kinder, I've decided to use the scope and sequence of Singapore Math, and yet not sit down and "do" the pages. The workbooks are more for me ... and from them I plan on doing hands-on things with my boys (my 2nd boy is almost 3 and loves to "homeschool"
). And, I am using the classical approach for relaxed science and history - we are going to focus on prehistoric times as both boys love dinosaurs anyway, and read a lot of books, make fossils, dig for bones in the backyard, and hopefully visit a few museums along the way. While doing the dinosaurs and prehistoric time periods, we will also read and learn about the animal kingdom and how animals are categorized (what makes a mammal, reptile, etc). I'm not pushing reading with him as he's not very interested (intellectually he *knows* enough to read but doesn't want to, so we aren't pushing it); but we continue to read to him and make his environment print-rich. But basically, I'm using math, science, and history as a way to informally introduce him to topics, and trying to make them as hands-on and experimental as possible so they are engaging. And am trying to also allow him time to discover and grow and learn on his own too.

ETA: The Singapore Math books (I bought all 4 of the Pre-K and K as I have 3 boys that will all be hs'd) are the only "curriculum" things I bought. For history and science, I bought the Usborne Internet-Linked Encyclopedia of World History as well as 11 picture books from amazon dealing with dinosaurs, prehistoric times, and the animal kingdom (What is a Mammal? ... type of books).
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by MyLittleWonders View Post
And am trying to also allow him time to discover and grow and learn on his own too.
I love the way you put this - it's so satisfying and confidence building for a child to be able to have space to discover, grow, and learn on his own.

Lillian
 

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World book has a standard course of study on their website.It's always given me an idea of about where we should be.Honestly though if my child wasn't "there" or even interested it wasn't happening,LOL They do turn out just fine though,the older ones are successful adults.Don't worry about it too much.ther's a lot to be said for child-led learning,
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by lisa72 View Post
Thanks everyone for the replies


My ds is 5. In Canada he would be in kindergarten right now, starting first grade next Sept. Here, he would start kindergarten next Sept.

We will end up back in Canada eventually.
Not sure where in Canada you would eventually end up but here is a link to the Ontario Curriculum guidelines made into checklists.

I don't really use it to guide our efforts but I do find it interesting (and quite frankly rather reassuring) to every once in awhile pull it out and see how we are doing based on where the schools would be at this point. They also have some rather interesting web links as well.

HTH

Steph
 
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