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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, so we made our foray into raw millk land with ice cream. It turned out yummy, but more icy than creamy. Is there something to do differently? We just mixed 2 c cream, 1 c milk, and 3 egg yolks, vanilla, and agave, and put it in the ice cream maker. I see that most ice cream recipes out there call for heating the custard first, but can't do that and still have it be raw.

Also, has anyone made flavored ice cream? DH wants to do mint choc chip, and I'm trying to figure out how. Could I lightly warm the milk and steep mint in it?
 

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What if you made mint tea (I freeze my mint leaves in a little water and then bring them just barely to a boil-I Think the freezing makes the mint flavor come out more...) and boiled it down until it was fairly strong/reduced and added it in lieu of the vanilla? (Coming from a total rookie so may not be worth much!)
 

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I've made mint chocolate chip ice cream but it's been awhile... but I know I used peppermint extract (and I know you can also use peppermint essential oil), reduced the vanilla extract a bit, and mixed the chips in at the very end when the machine stops running. You can also make a coconut oil/cocoa or carob sauce that will harden into a fun crunchy "chip" to put on top. YUM. I would just taste the mixture as you add a little of the extracts until it tastes good to you. Maybe start with half a teaspoon.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by mama-a-llama
Okay, so we made our foray into raw millk land with ice cream. It turned out yummy, but more icy than creamy. Is there something to do differently? We just mixed 2 c cream, 1 c milk, and 3 egg yolks, vanilla, and agave, and put it in the ice cream maker. I see that most ice cream recipes out there call for heating the custard first, but can't do that and still have it be raw.

Also, has anyone made flavored ice cream? DH wants to do mint choc chip, and I'm trying to figure out how. Could I lightly warm the milk and steep mint in it?
Mine is pretty creamy, and I use that same recipe. You could try it with all cream. There are various additives in grocery store ice cream that make it smoother, like guar gum and things, which I don't want in my ice cream!

Also, it comes out better in those old fashioned crank ice cream freezers with the rock salt and dry ice. The new small electric ones (which I use now) are very convenient, but they just never give the same texture. I think because they stop when it's very soft still, rather than really mixing until it's quite frozen like the old ones did.

Ann
 

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I was having the same problem...I read somewhere that scalding the milk will make it creamy and reduce icy-ness. I know...kinda defeats the purpose of making it with raw milk. I tried it today actually by heating the milk and refrigerating it for several hours - it's a world of difference.
 

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We've made some with raw milk but we've used raw cane sugar. It was very creamy. We haven't experimented with other sweeteners yet.
 

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actually, if you heat the custard at a low temp--it's still considered raw because a low temp doesn't pasturize.

it takes longer to heat the custard this way, but it works out great!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by zoebird
actually, if you heat the custard at a low temp--it's still considered raw because a low temp doesn't pasturize.

it takes longer to heat the custard this way, but it works out great!
We actually did another batch last night, but haven't tasted yet. But I'm interested in this for the future. How long do you heat, and at what temp? I remember around 110 is where enzymes start to be lost.
 

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Carly,

Just heat it slowly until it is just above body temperature. Depending on the sweetener, it will dissolve better in the heated milk. We've had good luck not heating the milk at all which is great because then we don't have to cool it before putting it in the ice cream maker.

Amanda
 

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Have any of you made ice cream the old-fashioned way, without an ice cream maker? If so, what recipe did you use and what were the results?
 

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in a churn, you make your custard just like with a machine, and gather your ingredients. you put them on the inside bowl of the churn (usually metal--sometimes helps to have it chilled first), and then you add ice to the outside edge around the bowl. add salt evenly to the ice. close the lid and then churn away.
 

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Quick ice cream tutorial


There are two varieties of ice cream - French and Philadelphia. French style starts with a cooked custard, Philadelphia style uses raw ingredients (well, conventional ice cream uses pasteurized ingredients, but they're not cooked into a custard. For our purposes, raw ice cream is Philadephia style.) By definition, custards involve the coagulation of the egg proteins. When diluted by the milk/cream (or water, coconut milk, whatever,) they coagulate somewhere around 175-185 degrees F. You cannot make a custard without heating the mixture to a temperature high enough to pasteurize the cream and eggs, period. However, Philadelphia styles of ice cream are perfectly legitimate. You don't need to make a cooked custard at all.

A big factor in determining the creaminess of your ice cream is the amount of sugar. You cannot make ice cream without sugar. The sugar does not freeze. As the water in the solution freezes into ice crystals, the sugar is left behind forming a higher concentration syrup. Eventually, you have a suspension of ice crystals, air pockets, fat globules, and a thick unfrozen syrup that holds it all in suspension. About 1/5 of the original water from the slurry remains liquid, as the concentrated sugar solution. Technically, ice cream is a very, very thick fluid. You need the right proportion of sugar to liquid in order to attain an appropriate texture. In my experiments with low-carb ice creams, I found that I could reduce the amount of sugar (I was using Florida Crystals) to 2 tablespoons per 4 cups of milk and cream, with the balance of the sweetness made up by stevia, and still have a scoop-able texture. It was definately not a fantastic, rich, creamy texture... but it was sufficiently ice-cream like, without being artificial, to ease my cravings
At 1/4 c. of sugar, the texture became much better, and at 1/2 cup sugar, the texture was pretty darned good.

There are also formulas for percentage of milkfat for perfect texture. With raw milk, which has very variable milkfat percentages, you'll never acheive consistant results on that front. Depending on style (French, Philadelphia, gelato, kulfi), milkfat percentages range from 3-20% by weight. Sugar percentages range from about 7-11% (except kulfi, which is around 18% sugar). Most

Compliments of a great man, here are the by-weight percentages for a premium Philadelphia style ice cream:
16-20% milk fat
7-8% other milk solids
13-16% sugar

Now, you'll never get perfect texture out of a home ice cream maker, no matter what your proportion of fat and sugar. They just don't get cold enough fast enough. The speed with which the ice cream is frozen determines the size of the ice crystals, which is a primary factor in the creaminess of the ice cream. You can buy a professional grade home ice cream maker... if you have 2 grand to spend on the venture. But, with enough sugar, you can work around that
Cooked custards also definately turn out better in a home ice cream maker.

(I'm going to research using some dry ice in a hand-cranked ice cream maker to see if that works better. I can buy pelletized dry ice, which means I could mix it with wet ice the way one would normally use rock salt... But, I'm currently using an electric ice cream maker, and don't have a hand-cranked one at my disposal.)

I've been considering experimenting with a half-cooked custard. That is, I'd make a custard with one cup of my milk and two eggs, then beat it with three cups of raw cream. That way I'd acheive the texture benefits of the coagulated egg protein and the health benefits of the raw milk. Whenever I get around to it (I have to get out for more raw cream, and figure out where my ice cream maker bowl is...) I'll let everyone know how it turns out


Now, my thoughts on agave nectar... I've never used this ingredient. I've had luck with maple syrup ice creams, and want to try one with raw honey and rose water... I see that agave nectar is 90% fructose. I wonder if the fructose has the same chemical effects as sucrose in this case? I'm guessing not. Perhaps you could try throwing in two tablespoons of Florida Crystals in with your agave nectar, and see if that makes a difference?

Now, for mint... I, personally, would just use a little bit of commercial extract. It's a small enough ingredient that I don't think it would hurt
But, you could try making your own extract - steep mint for a few days in vodka (or grain). Or, you could try crushing and steeping the mint in your milk or cream for a few days before making the ice cream. It will take some experimentation, though. I don't know how much mint to cream to advise you.
 

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I made mint choc chip ice cream the other week. I used the half-cooked custard method mentioned by Tara. (I always do it this way and it works just fine) While I heated the custard, I let several sprigs of fresh mint steep in it. Pulled them out before putting it in the maker. When I added the chips, I also added some finely chopped peppermint. Came out yummy!
 
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