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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The more I read, the more I believe the Montessori method is for us! Now...how to afford it? Sigh.<br><br>
Homeschool is do-able, but unless we win a lottery/scholarship or I go back to work...no way can we afford tuition.<br><br>
Questions:<br><br>
What will dd be missing by not being with 25-30 other kids?<br><br>
By homeschooling her, does it mean she won't receive the full benefit of the M method?<br><br>
If I get the concepts of the three period lesson, child led exploration, backing off/letting her learn on her own, the M materials, which materials to rotate and when, when to give little lessons, how to instruct in a less wordy way by modeling, and observation will I be able to do this properly?<br><br>
I have time to prepare the environment and myself. I am sort of an all or nothing type person. If I'm gonna do this, I'm gonna do it right...100%. However, it occured to me that a home environment may not allow for the 100% Montessori method, no matter how much I prepare. True?<br>
TIA
 

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I can't answer for your child, but I do feel my DD would miss it, and would not get as much out of even having access to the same materials without the other children. I think she gains a lot by watching other children do the works, it first of all motivates her to try them herself, even if they are challenging. Second, she also gains from helping her fellow younger students learn. She just completed her second year and she so enjoys her classmates, they make cards for each other all the time, she is always asking me to spell things so she can write notes for them, etc.<br><br>
Studies have found that first born children tend to have the highest IQs, with second born next, and so on even when things are controlled for time spent with the kids, etc. The hypothesis is that its the higher birth order child's opportunity to teach others that gives them that edge. I believe Montessori's multi-age classroom has the same advantage.<br><br>
Homeschoolers generally have groups they are involved with however which might balance it out, so you might poke around in the homeschooling forums for ideas. It was never much of an option for me personally because I don't have the patience and temperment to be a teacher and I find more and more I don't like playgroups and things, I would intend to go out, but in the end I'd just stay home and my children's education would suffer. However, maybe you could create or find a montessori homeschooling group which would help replace the classroom environment for your children.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Shami</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11549150"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">What will dd be missing by not being with 25-30 other kids?</div>
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That's the key thing. Without a lot of children in the class, she will miss out on the ability to teach the lessons to others, be taught by other children, and learn how to balance out social time and working time. This can be done in other ways, but it won't be a natural part of the environment.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">By homeschooling her, does it mean she won't receive the full benefit of the M method?</td>
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Well...yes and no. Yes in some sense, but it is also a case of just trying to do the best you can with what you do have. Montessori is more a philosophy and the school is set up around that philosophy and the way we teach is because of that philosophy. If you want to think about a shortage of materials and other problems, there was a lady by the name of Hilda Rothschild who was in the Nazi Prison camps. She helped do Montessori work with the children there with sticks and stones....so don't worry TOO much.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">If I'm gonna do this, I'm gonna do it right...100%. However, it occured to me that a home environment may not allow for the 100% Montessori method, no matter how much I prepare. True?<br>
TIA</td>
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If you're thinking 100% material-wise as well, realize tuition will be cheaper.
 

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have you actually looked into what is available in your area? what kind of tuition are we talking about? Are there any public opportuntites?<br>
if you just have the one child, then you could go to work while she is at school, which could be enough to pay for tuition. How would that fit into your plan?<br>
some schools here also allow for reduced tuition in the form of scholarships/aid AND in work-trade, like you would work for the school in exchange for reduced tuition, etc.<br><br>
good luck.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Shami</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11549150"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br>
If I get the concepts of the three period lesson, child led exploration, backing off/letting her learn on her own, the M materials, which materials to rotate and when, when to give little lessons, how to instruct in a less wordy way by modeling, and observation will I be able to do this properly?<br><br>
I have time to prepare the environment and myself. I am sort of an all or nothing type person. If I'm gonna do this, I'm gonna do it right...100%. However, it occured to me that a home environment may not allow for the 100% Montessori method, no matter how much I prepare. True?<br>
TIA</div>
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</tr></table></div>
Wow...it's like we're in the same position! Tuition around here is 8K/year and the only way we'd be able to afford it is if I worked while he was in school... which isn't an option for us because of other financial difficulties. I am also an all or nothin' type and I've done A TON of research as to where to find affordable, quality materials, and decent places to find affordable albums, and also very reasonable classes on teacher training online. It is not the ideal. I would rather be able to afford to have him in school...but we just don't have that option. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
PM me if you'd like my list of resources...I've found some classroom package deals on Montessori Materials for WAY LESS than I ever thought! There is hope! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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I found this the other day when looking at some Montessori stuff online and thought you might be interested: <a href="http://www.montessori.org/sitefiles/3-6_montessori_materials.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.montessori.org/sitefiles/..._materials.pdf</a> (of course for a homeschool, you wouldn't need the suggested quantities). I just got a pink tower, USA Montessori map, a couple of pencil holders, and a short bead stair and tray and spent $80!! That's not even the tippy tip tip of the iceburg for what I'd love to have in my home!<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I think she gains a lot by watching other children do the works, it first of all motivates her to try them herself, even if they are challenging.</td>
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This is exactly what I was going to say. That social interaction is in my top 3 reasons for having DD at her school. She has learned so much by her classmates and one little girl in particular has always helped her. They have formed a very close bond and I just heard the teacher say the other day to my DD, "Today we will work on language. I will have K (the little girl) work with us." I think this one child, in particular, really is a key motivator for my DD to branch out.<br><br>
There has been a lot of great advice in this thread! The last thing I wanted to agree with is that if you plan on homeschooling, I think it would be wise to find a Montessori homeschool group.
 

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I also think that many people think of Montessori as being for the 3-6 age group and don't always look at what happens after that. IMO (and of course, keep in mind I'm a trained Montessori elementary teacher <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent"> ) The 6-12 age period is also extremely important. The amount of learning and growth that goes on during this time is phenomenal.<br><br>
But a huge component in the 6-12 age range is the social group. Children of this age are by nature very social people and nearly always choose to work with others as opposed to working alone like they do in the younger age group. In fact, many of the lesson presented at the 6-12 range are designed to be presented to groups of various sizes, not just to individual children. The materials too are often designed for use by groups of children working together.<br><br>
Which is not to say that you couldn't do this if you were homeschooling, especially if your child had siblings or a homeschooling group. But it is definitely something to keep in mind for the future. Another thing is that often Montessori schools will not admit or will make it more difficult to admit children at the elementary age if they don't have previous Montessori school experience. I'm not sure how homeschooling would fit into that if you later decided to place your child in a more traditional Montessori school setting.<br><br>
Finally, I'm wondering if you're considering homeschooling if that means you are working from home or SAH or have a really flexible work schedule? Have you considered talking to your local school about assisting in a classroom or in the office? That was how I ended up getting sponsored by my school to become a teacher, and now both of my children are free. I would look into scholarships, sliding scales, or working at the school if any of those are feasible for you.<br><br>
Best of luck!
 

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My ds is only in primary at this point, but for him, he wouldn't have had nearly the same experience had I homeschooled him that he has had in his 28 student classroom.<br><br>
Sure, he gets lessons and works on materials himself. BUT - he is the biggest, nosiest little kid. He'll come home and tell me precisely what every other student worked on and a description of their lesson (mainly of the older children working with the bead materials - he is fascinated by those). Also, he has spent a bulk of the spring working with sandpaper letters and move-able alphabet - sometimes alone, but often with a friend. His favorite words to "spell" out? His classmates names...<br><br>
I just don't think I could replicate that sort of impact in a home environment...
 

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Hi OP,<br>
I feel the same way about Montessori and have thought about the social aspect the other posters have mentioned. For me it is either get a job by the time my boys are ready for elementary school and pay a little over 10k yearly for each child for school or do my best to homeschool them with the Montessori Method. I am right now choosing, but keeping my options open (my boys are 2 and 3 1/2), to try homeschooling with the Montessori Method. Getting a job, where I would most likely have to drop them off at school early to get to my job and where I would be picking them up probably around 6pm, just to send them to school just seems a little absurd for my family situation. We have purchased a ton of montessori materials and it cost no where near the cost of one year's tuition and I think things will work out just fine for our family. Good luck making your decision!<br><br>
SJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all of your responses. I am going to see what's in my area and check into scholarships. I'd be open to work at the school for tuition. I am a stay home mom so my schedule is open. Teacher in my former life.<br><br>
Cecimama I will def. pm you very soon. I've never pm'd anyone...hope I can make it work.<br><br>
Matt, i have no clue about the cost of materials, but if I have three kids (hoping for two more) I figured materials would be less than tuition.<br><br>
To all of you who have kids in M school, your perspective has helped me see how beneficial a classroom environment is...I hope there is a way for me.<br><br>
MissJ thanks for the encouragement. Glad to hear it's working for you. I've been reading the M homeschooling thread and it's helping me think all of this through. I hope you'll keep posting your experiences.<br><br>
BCFD thanks for the link, very helpful.
 

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Shami, check this link out. We just applied, but still haven't heard anything. I doubt we'll qualify, but I thought I'd try anyway.<br><br><a href="http://www.montessori-omi.org/1.html" target="_blank">http://www.montessori-omi.org/1.html</a>
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Shami</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11577168"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br>
Matt, i have no clue about the cost of materials, but if I have three kids (hoping for two more) I figured materials would be less than tuition.<br></div>
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I was just thinking for one child. So you may be right <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I think many places have good package deals. It might also be nice to be able to sell them second hand once you're done.
 
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