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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Will this affect the timing/amount of colostrum, and when my milk comes in?<br><br>
I haven't had any milk (at least that I can tell) for quite awhile now. Even before I got pregnant I don't think there was much there. Ds (3yo) doesn't nurse often or long (maybe 2x a day for a few minutes or less). But when my colostrum comes in, he will be getting it. Will that make it not last as long? Will it make my milk come in sooner?<br><br>
I always thought that it was birth that triggered the milk production, but now I am getting paranoid that nursing through it all will affect how much colostrum the new baby gets.<br><br>
When pregnant with ds I had colostrum towards the end of my pregnancy, and my milk came in around 3 days postpartum.<br><br>
I am just curious to know how breastfeeding affects the whole newborn/milk production balance. Thanks!
 

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My supply dwindled at about 10 weeks, but colostrum came in at around 7 months. My milk came in after about 24 hours, which was the same with my first birth. Your body will do what it needs to for the newborn, not the toddler <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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My dh was concerned about this- dd is 3 1/2 and nurses 1x/day, and I'm due next month. DH was afraid that she would "use up" all the colostrum. I read to him the info in THE BREASTFEEDING ANSWER BOOK, and he's ok now. You can probably find the info at <a href="http://www.lalecheleague.org" target="_blank">www.lalecheleague.org</a>.
 

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DOn;t worry <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
As you progress in yourt pregnancy your milk supply may, or may not die down, but by the time you give birth there will be plenty of colostrum for the new baby, and your milk will come in as normal as it did the first time.<br>
Your body knows what to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everyone. That's what I originally thought, but now as my due date approaches I was starting to get a little worried!
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><b>Changes in milk composition</b><br>
One study compared changes in the milk of two lactating pregnant mothers through the first two months of pregnancy to daily changes in the milk of two women who were gradually weaning (Prosser, Saint & Hartmann 1984). Milk composition and volume changes during pregnancy were similar to those during gradual weaning, but the changes during pregnancy occurred despite continued or increased nursing, rather than in response to a decrease in nursing frequency.<br><br>
The changes that accompany the decrease in milk supply would be expected to affect the taste of the milk, and indeed some nursing toddlers mention the change in taste to mom. Once the milk is mostly/fully colostrum, the taste may change again. Some nurslings don't like the taste change (particularly when combined with the concurrent reduction in milk supply) and may wean as a result. Some love it. Others either don't seem to notice the change, continue nursing despite the change, or simply don't mind.<br><br><b>Will I produce colostrum?</b><br>
Yes. The changeover between mature milk and colostrum production begins, on average, between the 4th and 8th month of pregnancy, but some mothers start producing colostrum somewhat earlier than that. Many mothers who nurse through pregnancy have noted that their milk contains mostly colostrum during the last month before baby is born. <i><b>You will continue to produce colostrum throughout the latter part of your pregnancy - your older nursling cannot "use it up."</b></i><br><br><b>Colostrum and stool changes in the older nursling</b><br>
If your older nursling is getting a good quantity of colostrum (either before or after birth), the natural laxative effect of the colostrum may cause him/her to have looser and more frequent stools. The stools should return to normal once your colostrum is completely replaced with mature milk.</td>
</tr></table></div>
<a href="http://www.kellymom.com/tandem/faq/16milkchanges.html#colostrum" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/tandem/faq/1...html#colostrum</a><br><br>
HTH! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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ive been tandem for a week now,<br><br><br>
i found that both babes got significantly MORE colostrum than my ds did 2 years ago. ive been nursing one or both around the clock,my milk came in about 48 hours after birth - same as last time- but the colostrum and milk flow much more freely.<br><br>
tabitha nak
 

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I am not sure if I needed to post this here or in the "breastfeeding beyond infancy" forum so please move it if necessary.<br><br>
I am almost 4 months pregnant and nursing my dd about 10-12 times a day still. She had a horrid stomach flu last week and is still having loose stools...I am noticing though that they are looking more and more like newborn breastfed poop and less like diarrhea. (She has sworn off food and has simply been nursing for the last week...) Can I be producing colostrum this early? I have read it makes their poop runny - how long does that last? Just curious and wanting to make sure she is getting better form her flu...thanks!
 
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