Mothering Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,405 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
If your previous babe was posterior or in some other way malpostioned, were your subsequent babes also? And If they weren't is there anything special you did to have them be anterior? My 2 DD so far were both posterior with both hands on head (nuchal hands compound) and I would love to try to avoid this with this little one.<br>
Thanks for any advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,524 Posts
My first baby was fine. My second baby was undiagnosed asynclitic and posterior. I say undiagnosed because I had no back labor at all, and my labor progressed evenly (8 hours total). But when it got to second stage, I never had the urge to push, every push hurt and was disorienting, and I pushed for 90 minutes, which was a long time for a multip (although baby #1 was 3 hours).<br><br>
During my 3rd pregnancy, I really didn't want another posterior baby, BUT, I felt like if he was posterior, I could do it, as baby #2 never rotated, was born star-gazing, and he was 9 pounds, 9 ounces, so I felt my pelvis was proven -- no worried there.<br><br>
At some point in my 6 hour labor with #3 my midwife figured he was posterior also, but still, no back pain. I tried pushing, and it hurt really bad. I would start and stop -- I probably did that for an hour, starting and stopping because it hurt too bad. Then I got up, lunged with a foot up about 2 feet, he rotated to anterior, and was born in the next contraction. He was only 8 pounds, 2 ounces (my first baby had been 9 pounds, 8 ounces). And even though he was smaller, he had a nuchal hand.<br><br>
I would suggest, instead of spending time thinking about the potential of another posterior baby, spend time focusing on how you can help things change during labor IF baby is posterior. Remind yourself you did it before, and you can do it again. Throw it out to the universe that you don't want labor to begin with your water breaking <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">. Keep all the cushion and slippery amniotic fluid you can! Then deal with it as it comes.<br><br>
Of course there is proactive OFP, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,405 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I did it before, and have to say my labours were relatively quick, with dd1 11 hours start to finsih, dd2 was 4 hours start to finish...but suposedly the posterior postions and the nuchal hands were contributors to the ouchy back labour and pain in puching. I could do it again. I know that. With dd1 my water never "broke" but I had slow leak and almost a dry birth, and with dd2 my labour started with water breaking spontaneusly. I can do it again, but wanted to know any ideas to make it easier if it happened, especially since we are considering UC. I read about chiropractic care possible helping malpositons, and have been trying to find out other ideas...and will definitley be praying and thinking positive thoughts but want to find some tings I could do if needed too<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,188 Posts
Bookmark this site:<br><a href="http://www.spinningbabies.com" target="_blank">www.spinningbabies.com</a><br><br>
It's an AWESOME site about how to encourage optimum fetal positioning. My first babe was posterior with nuchal hand & I truly believe following the recommendations on the site were what helped my other babies to be LOA. My first birth was 18 hours, my second two were 4 1/2 and 1 hour, 40 mins. LOA really helped the time & not hurting so much.<br><br>
Do you sit in a recliner?<br>
Drive/ride much in bucket seats?<br>
Relax reclined?<br>
Sit on cushy couches or overstuffed chairs?<br>
------all that contributes to posterior babies----<br><br>
That said, sometimes there are certain pelivises or certain baby anatomy that would make posterior the best position. However, I'd be leary of saying that unless all the spinnigbabies protocols were followed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,468 Posts
My first was asynclitic and posterior, and I was vigilant throughout the whole pregnancy about sitting in the correct posture, avoiding recliners, etc., etc. I took positioning very seriously.<br><br>
My second was positioned beautifully and was just a textbook birth in every way, and I had made much less of an effort to avoid recliners and so forth, because I was preoccupied with moving halfway across the country and DH losing his job and a bunch of other stuff going on in my life at that time.<br><br>
So as with all things, following the "rules" can be helpful, but is absolutely no guarantee. (The corollary is that you should not beat yourself up if you have a posterior/asynclitic/whatever baby and think, "Oh, this is my fault because I sat in a recliner once." Nor should you let other people beat you up about it either!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,603 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>JanB</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7894090"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">So as with all things, following the "rules" can be helpful, but is absolutely no guarantee. (The corollary is that you should not beat yourself up if you have a posterior/asynclitic/whatever baby and think, "Oh, this is my fault because I sat in a recliner once." Nor should you let other people beat you up about it either!)</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Yes, this is so true. I carry my babies posterior. I can't carry them anterior, even when the placenta isn't anterior. And with all the kids I have I can tell you I don't spend a lot of time reclining <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I don't even own a recliner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,290 Posts
DS was posterior, though he turned in labor (thanks to info from the Spinning Babies website). I did spend a lot of time reclining during my pregnancy with him, I went on complete bedrest at 30 weeks due to preterm labor. He also had a nuchal hand.<br><br>
DD was not posterior but she had a nuchal hand just like DS did. In both cases I ended up with a tear on the side with the nuchal hand. It was a 2nd-3rd degree tear with DS (8 lb 3 oz) but only a minor skid mark with DD (10 lbs) that didn't require stitches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,862 Posts
My first was posterior and my 2nd and 3rd were not/have not been. I read Optimal Fetal Positioning and paid a lot of attention to my posture after about 32 weeks or so. I also sat/sit on a birth ball instead of on the couch.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,477 Posts
My first was posterior. I had no idea that my positioning could have an effect on how she was lying -- reclining was my relaxing position of choice. With my second, I was very careful to lean forward more and avoid reclining as much as I could. He was anterior and the birht was much quicker and less painful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,265 Posts
All three of mine have been in off positions. Two were footling breeches & the third posterior. I have scoliosis and there's some speculation that physiological abnormalities caused by it can contribute to malpositioning & it certainly seems to have been the case with me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
My first was posterier, and I never even made it to pushing. I also just bought these great new overstuffed chairs during that pregnancy, that I relcined in A LOT.<br>
This last pregnancy, I sat on the birth ball A LOT! I did a lot of hand and knees crawling (dd loved playing kitty with me), and ds was anterior and out in 30min!
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top