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i have been assigned to work with a teacher in a classroom with children diagnosed with autism. two of the children i've known since they were 3 from another center that i worked in. i'm there from 8-1:30 every week day.the assignment ends 1-14-05. this is the first time i've worked in a classroom that is a kinder/1st room. the rest have all been pre-k. i don't want to step on the teachers' toes but the room and the schedules need improvement. there are no props for circle time , no music. all we do is check schedule with the pecs and do everything else with pecs. the room is not set up badly, the children do have color coded centers to go to and that works ok, but it needs something else. for example, yesterday i worked with a child who is pretty high functioning and working toward mainstreaming. we sat and did endless language arts worksheets for at least 30 minutes! it was so hard to get him to sit down. once he sat down he could do it. i just think these children need more hands on experience. like finger painting the letters, making letters with sand. matching letters to the objects but hands on that requires no pencil. then i learn that this is the teachers first year and he has a degree in english not child dev. so my question is to you mothers with a k or first grader in special ed and who has been diagnosed with asd, what does your childs' classroom look like?<br><br>
what materials are used to teach language arts?
 

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Just joined this forum and it's years late for a reply but my autistic son doesn't like hands on types of things. He has real sensory issues. He won't finger paint or make letters in sand. But he loves workbook pages and can do them for hours and preferably by himself. Each autistic child is different. Some may crave sensory overload and love sand - especially if their hands are buried in it and they feel the pressue/weight of the sand.<br><br>
Getting him to sit to do the work is often the battle. I wish moms of autistic children could help plan school days. Your wanting to help more is great. With that belief, you will succeed with these kids. They seem to know who is trying to help them and will after awhile try to meet you on some common ground. Listen/watch for clues from the children. They are sending them out all the time it's just very hard for neurotypicals to hear/see/interpret them. As one adult autistic person said, "Think how hard it is to be when you think most of the people in the world are strange."
 
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