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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mainly because of all the health issues that purebreds can have. We've been asked to foster a beagle who's come back to our rescue organization 5 times. We really like beagles and are considering getting another dog-hopefully one that will bond really well to my son. As far as I know, this dog was mostly returned for his barking (baying?) and chewing stuff up. My husband loves pugs, but what about the health problems? Are pugs good with kids? The rescue organization I foster with also has a "puggle." She's pug and beagle and that's about all I know about her.

Also, I know that dogs shed, but we have a dog who SHEDS LIKE CRAZY all year. Beagles and pugs shed a lot don't they? But on the other hand, we already deal with a bunch of dog hair. Would more make that much of a difference? I guess I'm asking for your advice.
:

Thanks.
 

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Being a purebred in and of itself is not going to increase the chance of health problems. Cross breds are a mix of 2 or more purebreds, which means they are susceptable to the exact same genetic issues that the parents are. The only way to get that "hybrid vigor" that people talk about is if you are willing to raise a wild dog that's been subjected for many generations to survival of the fittest.
Beagles and pugs both shed, both can be good with children, it all depends on the dog. I'm guessing if a beagle has been returned 5 times though that it's problems may be more than you can handle, barking and chewing are just things that come with beagles, so either the rescue is NOT screening potential homes properly or there is more wrong with this dog than just being a beagle.
 

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It kind of raises concern that you are not willing to deal with a pet's medical issues. Any pet can have a medical emergency, or a chronic problem, like arthritis. If someone is not willing or able to deal with medical problems, they ought to reconsider adopting a pet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Shannon-Good point about the beagle. Even though I love the typical beagle personality, the loudness would probably bother my husband. We saw an adorable black pug puppy today at a Halloween festival in our city. They have a dog costume contest, so there were lots of dogs out. Thanks for your advice.

Here's a link to the black pug I'm considering. She's on the second page and her name is Lydia. http://www.tulsapets.com/maindog.htm

Queen-It's not worry about paying for or dealing with medical issues. It's worry about there being a greater chance of losing one early due to inherited medical problems. Perhaps I wouldn't worry so much if I bought a puppy from a quality breeder, but I don't like that idea. I prefer to adopt rescued dogs. But the only thing about adopting a purebred is that you don't know its parents or if it was bred by a responsible breeder. And my understanding is that purebred dogs are more prone to certain inherited medical problems. At least that's what the breed websites and books say.
 

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Unless you are thinking of adopting one of the FEW breeds so known for their health problems that they're genuinely a poor risk (Great Danes would be one, Bulldogs another), don't be fooled into thinking that purebreds are actually less healthy. Breed-specific problems get a lot of press because breeders and owners are concerned about them and are doing a lot of research and paying a lot of attention in an attempt to eradicate them. The CONSIDERABLE problems associated with mixed-breeds don't get as much attention because they don't get labeled. Imagine you're a vet. You see 78 mixed-breeds with skin problems, 32 shar-peis with skin problems, 8 Labs, and 2 Collies. You're going to tell potential owners that shar-peis have a ton of skin problems--and they do, when compared to the other purebreds, but you still see a lot more in the background population of mixed-breeds than you do any other. But it's hard to label or generalize about mixed-breed dogs because there's nothing to "point to," you know? You can't say, "Oh, those collie-lab-shepherd-terriers, they're problematic."

There are two kinds of health problems associated with any breed. One type have to do with the animal's body shape, size, and features. For example, short-faced dogs often have breathing problems, or big deep-chested dogs bloat. If you want to avoid those problems, don't adopt a flat-faced dog or big deep-chested dog--those have nothing to do with "breeds."

The other type is the genetic type; problems caused by the genetic bottleneck of purebred breeding. Examples are epilepsy, "storage" diseases, stuff like that. The good thing about those is that even in the purest of the purebreeds, genetic diseases are relatively rare. You've got a 95% chance that you won't ever see them. And if one or more of them is so scary to you that you NEVER want to see them (if you say, "I just could never deal with a dog with epilepsy/juvenile cataracts/whatever"), then just do your research and stay away from the purebreds for whom that problem is particularly prevalent.
 

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That's the point though, you have no clue what the parents of a mixed breed dog were like either. So your chances of getting a healthy mutt are NO better than getting a healthy purebred. The ONLY time you increase your chances of a healthy dog are when you go to a breeder that is screening for health problems in the breed or when you go to a breed of dogs that is known to have very few health problems. Even then though, you have NO guarentees. I've posted before about my last female, she was my pick, Sheena's pick, everyone's pick of the entire litter of very well bred working lines. Her hips were SO bad that had I not just lost my male, I'd likely have just put her down apon seeing that x-ray. The entire litter with the exception of our pick bitch had perfect hips. It's often just luck of the draw.
 

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Pugs are great with kids in general, but they are very underfoot. I've never had a more dependant breed of dog in my life. IME of having pugs they follow you everywhere given the opportunity and are always underfoot. They are annoying to people that want a fairly independant dog. They also do not do well in heat due to their pushed in noses, we do live in the desert but our pugs only go outside when they want to and I would never expect one to be an outside dog.

Having said all that I don't ever plan on being without a pug in my life. But they aren't for everyone.

oh and about shedding. I don't think that ours shed alot, but I've been around some that do.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by momofcutie View Post
Thanks for responding! What do you think about rescuing a pug versus a pug puppy?
I think all puppies/dogs deserve good homes. You can either buy one as a puppy (from a reputable breeder of course) and raise it up from puppyhood on to adulthood or rescue one that may be on death row and give it a life it may not otherwise have. Ours was on deathrow..only a few hrs away and initially we were just going to "look"....but after I saw her card, we knew we couldn't leave without her.

Oh and just a little FYI...I've been hearing of bad "rescues" as well. So just because people label themselves that way, does not mean they are good rescues. (ex, most rescues I know spay/nueter dogs BEFORE going to their homes and do home checks as well).
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by momofcutie View Post
Thanks for responding! What do you think about rescuing a pug versus a pug puppy?
We have done both. And honestly the rescued pug was the best dog I've ever had. But it wasn't really a rescue, it was the breeders retired stud. We got him at age 6 and he lived until he was 13, we had to put him down last year and it was so sad
: I got him because at the time caring for a puppy was not something I'd have been able to do. We got the pug puppy about 3-4 years later.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Arduinna View Post
We have done both. And honestly the rescued pug was the best dog I've ever had. But it wasn't really a rescue, it was the breeders retired stud. We got him at age 6 and he lived until he was 13, we had to put him down last year and it was so sad
: I got him because at the time caring for a puppy was not something I'd have been able to do. We got the pug puppy about 3-4 years later.
I agree. Having 2 little ones in my household and being preggo last yr, we pretty much knew a puppy wasn't for us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks everyone. You have great points and I am more relaxed about it now.
But the pug I was wanting to go meet has already been adopted!
 
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