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Discussion Starter #1
<p>I need some support.  I have been homeschooling for all of about 2 weeks.  I wanted to do it, but we got thrown into it earlier than expected (I posted about this).  I believe whole heartedly in homeschooling and always have, but I just feel like I do a crappy job.  I continue to tell myself that my kids need SOME of what they can offer at public school, but I hate the negative parts that are included with PS.  It's going to take time for me to get many of the supplies I want that will make this easier on me, so I'm doing what I can with the internet and things we already have at home.</p>
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<p>For example.  I thought we'd try unit studies and focus on genealogy.  My 8 year old is interested in learning about our family and it's history, but I don't feel like I do a good job helping her get into it without my direct input.  I've always believed in the idea that our children are not empty vessels waiting to be filled up, but we should help them learn to think and give them opportunities to be creative etc.   I feel like I give her exact things to do, but she doesn't take off with anything.  I helped her make a family tree on posterboard and even getting her to decorate it seems difficult.</p>
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<p>How can I help her be more creative and enjoy getting into things more independently? </p>
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<p>my 1 year old just woke up...but there was more.</p>
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<p>ideas?</p>
<p>sarah</p>
 

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<p>Many people on here say the kids need a period of deschooling.  Some kids coming out of school do not have the experience of working without explicit direction.  And if they do get "into" a project and start to take off with it, it's time to move on to something else and they have to put it away.</p>
 

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<p>Yeah, it's almost winter break time anyway. Declare a holiday and tell your kids it's time to have fun and enjoy themselves as a family. Then, in two or three weeks, look back at what you've all done and use this knowledge to plan your homeschooling path.</p>
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<p>MHO....</p>
 

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<p>If it were my dd I would ask her if she minded if I did some decorating on the posterboard and then sit down and start doing it and see if she would join or perhaps take over.  Could end up being a fun time working together on something.  If she was not receptive, I would hang it up as is and say something like "we can work on this when you're ready", or "it's fine the way it is".  She might come back to it on her own, or not.  Then I would switch gears and focus on the holidays and finding fun things you can do to revel in your new found freedom.  Take a breather and enjoy the process of deschooling.  You have plenty of time to get into more structure later on if that works for you and your dd!</p>
 

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<p>When my mom pulled me out of school in 7th grade, I spent two months doing nothing but my chores, reading whatever books I wanted (my favorite activity) and cooking with my mom (another favorite activity.)</p>
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<p>After that there was more structure but I also found some interests during that month of just reading.</p>
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<p>I know your daughter is only 8, but perhaps if you ask your daughter to come up with her own project of how to learn genealogy she will have some ideas.  Ask her what she thinks she should do.  Ask her what she thinks she will learn.  Ask her what materials (by materials I mean both physical and ideas) she will need and ask her where she thinks she will find htem.  How will she arrange them?  Should she talk to grandma or go the library?  Write down notes or draw pictures?</p>
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<p>Ask her how she will know when she is done with her project.</p>
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<p>It may help to have her record her answers that way she has somethingt to refer to.</p>
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<p>Then let her do her research or project.  If she stalls, ask what she thinks would help get her on track.  If she decides to abandon the project ask her what she thinks she would want to do differently.  Ask her what she learned from deciding to stop that line of inquiry.  If she completes the project ask her about what she learned and if it was the same as what she predicted she would learn.  Was how she predicted she would know she was done the same as how she ultimately decided she was done?</p>
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<p>Finally, after the project is done, talk about what advice she would offer to herself the next time she does a project.</p>
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<p>Etc.</p>
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<p>So as the project works out or doesn't work out she will learn what methods of learning work for her. </p>
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<p>So think of it not only as a project to learn social studies, but for you both to discover what works in learning.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter #6
<p>what wonderful responses.  Maybe we do need to deschool a bit.  Especially for me--I keep feeling like I need to create this major learning environment...while I say that my 8 and 4 year old are setting up "store" and selling each other things.  hmmm.</p>
 
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