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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if anyone thinks there are drawbacks to starting this young? DD is 16 months. Did M not work out for anyone's LO this young?<br><br>
BTW, I've been interested in M for some time, done some reading but have much more to look into.
 

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DD2 has been a Montessori student since 15 months, first in a half-day Young Chilren's Community, and for the past 4 years in the All Day Community (ages 3 to 6). No drawbacks that we've been aware of, except around here is nearly impossible to find quality All Day programming for those that need extended care AND Montessori. There are a few for-profit daycares here that have Montessori in thier name, but when I observed there, it was in name only. (It is a chain).
 

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I would say it sort of depends on why you are doing it. Do you work and your child would otherwise be in daycare? Then why not? I can't see how Montessori infant/toddler care would be worse than another institutional daycare (and probably the same with in-home daycare except in exceptional circumstances). On the other hand, if you are going to be at home? I would not send a child that young into an institutional environment, Montessori or otherwise, if it was unnecessary. Bonding with mom is, IMO, more important than the things the child might learn in a toddler program at that age. Now if there was a parent/toddler program available, I would totally do that.<br><br>
Just a working mom's perspective.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">On the other hand, if you are going to be at home? I would not send a child that young into an institutional environment, Montessori or otherwise, if it was unnecessary. Bonding with mom is, IMO, more important than the things the child might learn in a toddler program at that age.</td>
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I am a full time SAHM and my children are in a Montessori toddler room that runs for 3 1/2 hours 4 mornings/week during the school year. I hardly think that 14 hours out of their week is harming their bonding with me.<br><br>
What do they get out of the program? Well, they love it for one thing. I have to remind them to kiss me goodbye before they run into their classroom and select an activity to work on. Certainly they have learned concrete things, such as how to put on their own coats, and their language has blossomed, but the biggest selling point for me is how much they love it.<br><br>
As far as my son is concerned the child height sink is the best thing in the whole world.<br><br>
I do think that this idea that seems to be in vogue in our society that the mother should do it all is a little insane. "It takes a village" may be a cliche these days but it is true. Their program directress offers them things that I, by virtue of my temperament and personality, cannot. The prepared environment offers them resources that I, in a small house, cannot recreate.<br><br>
That said, I think whether children benefit from a program at this age is likely very dependent on the personality of the child. Even our directress has commented on how independent my kids are (rather like their mother). I was told when I enrolled them that if they did not adjust the school would refund my money and we would try again when they were older. However, they only got upset when it was time to leave and the other kids got to stay (the school does a slow phase in for new students where they start by coming in for just an hour, then 2, then the whole morning). Some kids would, I am sure, not feel secure being left in a program.
 

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I waited until my oldest DD was 2y11m before enrolling her into a play based preschool that was T & Th from 9-12. I thought 6 hours a week would be great to ease her into social situations. That school did not work out (she only spent 3 hours total there when I pulled her). We then searched and searched and searched until we found her current Mont school. We enrolled her at 3y3m and she went 1 half day per week for a month, then 2 days per week for 2 months, and then 5 half days per week. She is now 3y8m and she is thriving and *LOVES* her school, classmates, and guide. Loves it. She was my first child and there is no way I would have put her into a school environment at 15 months. We joined an AP mommy group (which also turned out to be a not so healthy thing for mommy), but ultimately I am glad that I waited until she was 3. My 2nd DD is now 2y9m and we are enrolling her in the same school next month at 2y10m. My youngest is 18 months and we will wait until she is probably close to 3, but I did consider enrolling her earlier for the reasons that Zadee said above:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Their program directress offers them things that I, by virtue of my temperament and personality, cannot. The prepared environment offers them resources that I, in a small house, cannot recreate.</td>
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Now that I have seen what exactly Montessori is, I have seriously considered enrolling DD#3, however, finances is a big problem (expensive school) and I'm still not 100% sure I could part with my baby quite yet. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
I was also going to ask if you work. Or are you a SAHM? Do you have other children?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>freistms</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11644291"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would not send a child that young into an institutional environment, Montessori or otherwise, if it was unnecessary. Bonding with mom is, IMO, more important than the things the child might learn in a toddler program at that age. Now if there was a parent/toddler program available, I would totally do that.<br><br>
Just a working mom's perspective.</div>
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I am at home full time, but work from home during naptime and after dd goes to bed. I am thinking about bringing someone in to help so I'm not stretching myself so thin, and that's one of the reasons I started to consider M.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Zadee</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11646552"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br>
What do they get out of the program? Well, they love it for one thing. I have to remind them to kiss me goodbye before they run into their classroom and select an activity to work on. Certainly they have learned concrete things, such as how to put on their own coats, and their language has blossomed, but the biggest selling point for me is how much they love it.<br><br>
However, they only got upset when it was time to leave and the other kids got to stay (the school does a slow phase in for new students where they start by coming in for just an hour, then 2, then the whole morning). Some kids would, I am sure, not feel secure being left in a program.</div>
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This is helpful and interesting to hear. My daughter is both very attached and very independent. I think with a slow phase in, she would be like yours, running off leaving me in the dust. I'm probably not ready for that...<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/mecry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="crying">.<br><br>
I would LOVE a parent/toddler program and need to check on that. Wouldn't help with the childcare needs but would be a great intro for both of us.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BCFD</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11647032"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I waited until my oldest DD was 2y11m before enrolling her into a play based preschool that was T & Th from 9-12. I thought 6 hours a week would be great to ease her into social situations. That school did not work out (she only spent 3 hours total there when I pulled her). We then searched and searched and searched until we found her current Mont school. We enrolled her at 3y3m and she went 1 half day per week for a month, then 2 days per week for 2 months, and then 5 half days per week. She is now 3y8m and she is thriving and *LOVES* her school, classmates, and guide. Loves it. She was my first child and there is no way I would have put her into a school environment at 15 months. We joined an AP mommy group (which also turned out to be a not so healthy thing for mommy), but ultimately I am glad that I waited until she was 3. My 2nd DD is now 2y9m and we are enrolling her in the same school next month at 2y10m. My youngest is 18 months and we will wait until she is probably close to 3, but I did consider enrolling her earlier for the reasons that Zadee said above:<br><br><br><br>
Now that I have seen what exactly Montessori is, I have seriously considered enrolling DD#3, however, finances is a big problem (expensive school) and I'm still not 100% sure I could part with my baby quite yet. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
I was also going to ask if you work. Or are you a SAHM? Do you have other children?</div>
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I hear your concerns and this is what I always thought too. I didn't want my children in 'school' environment early on. I like that M philosophy is different than my traditional teacher-directed school experience, but it is definitely not home. Just wondering, how strongly do you feel that M is an institutional setting? I guess that word doesn't have to have a negative connotation, but renders one for me. I think a few hours/couple days of week wouldn't be like sending my child to school but hopefully just another warm loving environment where my child can form relationships and learn from those around her. This is quite dependent on the school, directress, and other factors. I know not all M programs are created equal.<br><br>
Thanks for the input. I need to visit the school to see for myself next.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AJHCFamily</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11653146"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I hear your concerns and this is what I always thought too. I didn't want my children in 'school' environment early on. I like that M philosophy is different than my traditional teacher-directed school experience, but it is definitely not home. Just wondering, how strongly do you feel that M is an institutional setting? I guess that word doesn't have to have a negative connotation, but renders one for me. I think a few hours/couple days of week wouldn't be like sending my child to school but hopefully just another warm loving environment where my child can form relationships and learn from those around her. This is quite dependent on the school, directress, and other factors. I know not all M programs are created equal.<br><br>
Thanks for the input. I need to visit the school to see for myself next.</div>
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You could always start off with a 2 or 3 day a week program. I know in our area there are a lot of Montessori schools and a lot of them have 2 and 3 day programs, but I know in other parts of the country it doesn't seem very common. DD's school even has a 1 day program!!<br><br>
I will never forget the day that I walked into one of the young toddler rooms (18-24 months) and saw a 20 month old baby sorting 3 colors - red, yellow, green. He was having a blast and was SO proud of himself. I actually got to know this little guy and his family and his grandma is the co-director at DD's school. So, he has been brought up in a Montessori environment. I know that the guides at DD's school are amazing and loving and gentle with the children. The children are shown so much respect and in return you can really see how that pays off in the children's behaviors. I think you really have to find the right school. DD's school has AMS trained teachers, but more importantly they are gentle and loving. Finding a well trained guide PLUS a loving person is what you need. For instance, just because a school is AMI doesn't automatically mean the teachers are going to have that nurturing spirit. Observe, observe, and observe until you find the right school.
 

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DS2 is on the waitlist for a fantastic AMI school near us, and if he gets in, he'll be starting at 18 mos (DS1's wonderful M school, unfortunately, does not have a toddler program). I work parttime and am in grad school so this would be a great option for us, and far better, IMO than most other childcare arrangements for this age. Did you visit the school? I would check it out and see how "institutional" it feels to you; one of the reasons I love the school where we are waitlisted is how warm and home-like it feels even though it is not in a home (although I'd bet an in-home Montessori toddler program would be ideal for this age group). Good luck!
 

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I am an infant/toddler trained montessori teacher, I work with infants and toddlers 4 months to 18 months. Most of the time the parents are working parents, but occasionally some stay at home parents enroll their children for part of the day at varying ages. The benefits of having infants and toddlers in our program, among others, is their interactions with other children and the modeling of the caregivers and older children.<br>
For example, empathy is learned. If a young infant spends some time around other children and a trained caregiver is their to mediate and help them to problem solve, I'd say they are getting ALOT out of the program. Not to mention all of the opportunities to learn to care for themselves, each other, and their environment. Also, my program is bi lingual and (French, Enlish) and we also do signing with them. I would also say that we do alot of parent education, so the parents get alot out of the program as well. (positive discipline, encouragement, or just a shoulder to cry on) I also want to say that a montessori teacher is trained to be an astute observer of the children and their interactions with each other and their environment. Often, we can see things that a parent cannot see (due to the nature of parent/child relationship). I know this because I am also a parent of two Montessori children and their teachers have been a guiding light for our family. I hope this is helpful!
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Montessori Mama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11807995"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am an infant/toddler trained montessori teacher, I work with infants and toddlers 4 months to 18 months. Most of the time the parents are working parents, but occasionally some stay at home parents enroll their children for part of the day at varying ages. The benefits of having infants and toddlers in our program, among others, is their interactions with other children and the modeling of the caregivers and older children.<br>
For example, empathy is learned. If a young infant spends some time around other children and a trained caregiver is their to mediate and help them to problem solve, I'd say they are getting ALOT out of the program. Not to mention all of the opportunities to learn to care for themselves, each other, and their environment. Also, my program is bi lingual and (French, Enlish) and we also do signing with them. I would also say that we do alot of parent education, so the parents get alot out of the program as well. (positive discipline, encouragement, or just a shoulder to cry on) I also want to say that a montessori teacher is trained to be an astute observer of the children and their interactions with each other and their environment. Often, we can see things that a parent cannot see (due to the nature of parent/child relationship). I know this because I am also a parent of two Montessori children and their teachers have been a guiding light for our family. I hope this is helpful!</div>
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Are you in San Diego?! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> Your program sounds so wonderful, I wish I could send my DS there!
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Zadee</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11646552"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am a full time SAHM and my children are in a Montessori toddler room that runs for 3 1/2 hours 4 mornings/week during the school year. I hardly think that 14 hours out of their week is harming their bonding with me.<br><br>
What do they get out of the program? Well, they love it for one thing. I have to remind them to kiss me goodbye before they run into their classroom and select an activity to work on. Certainly they have learned concrete things, such as how to put on their own coats, and their language has blossomed, but the biggest selling point for me is how much they love it.<br><br>
As far as my son is concerned the child height sink is the best thing in the whole world.<br><br>
I do think that this idea that seems to be in vogue in our society that the mother should do it all is a little insane. "It takes a village" may be a cliche these days but it is true. Their program directress offers them things that I, by virtue of my temperament and personality, cannot. The prepared environment offers them resources that I, in a small house, cannot recreate.<br><br>
That said, I think whether children benefit from a program at this age is likely very dependent on the personality of the child. Even our directress has commented on how independent my kids are (rather like their mother). I was told when I enrolled them that if they did not adjust the school would refund my money and we would try again when they were older. However, they only got upset when it was time to leave and the other kids got to stay (the school does a slow phase in for new students where they start by coming in for just an hour, then 2, then the whole morning). Some kids would, I am sure, not feel secure being left in a program.</div>
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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Montessori Mama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11807995"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am an infant/toddler trained montessori teacher, I work with infants and toddlers 4 months to 18 months. Most of the time the parents are working parents, but occasionally some stay at home parents enroll their children for part of the day at varying ages. The benefits of having infants and toddlers in our program, among others, is their interactions with other children and the modeling of the caregivers and older children.<br>
For example, empathy is learned. If a young infant spends some time around other children and a trained caregiver is their to mediate and help them to problem solve, I'd say they are getting ALOT out of the program. Not to mention all of the opportunities to learn to care for themselves, each other, and their environment. Also, my program is bi lingual and (French, Enlish) and we also do signing with them. I would also say that we do alot of parent education, so the parents get alot out of the program as well. (positive discipline, encouragement, or just a shoulder to cry on) I also want to say that a montessori teacher is trained to be an astute observer of the children and their interactions with each other and their environment. Often, we can see things that a parent cannot see (due to the nature of parent/child relationship). I know this because I am also a parent of two Montessori children and their teachers have been a guiding light for our family. I hope this is helpful!</div>
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I resonate with what both of you are sharing here!<br>
My daughter is 15 months old and will begin at a small half day M toddler house in two weeks- I couldn't be more ecstatic!<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy">:<br>
By my instincts, she seems very ready and the environment and interaction with others will complement what we offer her at home. btw, we chose this route as enrichment and something fun for our dd. We don't *need* the care. I think much of this depends on the child and the Mama.
 
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