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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,<br><br>
I am nearing my due date and trying to soak up all the breast feeding info I can get my hands on.<br><br>
I believe that I have a flat nipple or sometimes even inverted but I’m not sure. It will come out sometimes but most of the time it’s flat. The other one seems to stick out most of the time but not much….very close to flat.<br><br>
So does anyone have advice on what to do with this? My midwife just told me that the baby will suck it out when latched on properly.<br><br>
I’m trying to prepare for all the possible road blocks I might have while establishing breast feeding.<br><br>
Thanks for your help.
 

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I have inverted nipples and DS couldn't latch well, BUT I think that was mainly because of his bubble palate. However, for the next baby my plan is to pump after every feeding for the first few days to help bring in the milk (in case s/he also has trouble and can't bring it in well), and to get a lactation consultant in for at least 3 hours-- one devoted just to me, not just the hospital ones who rush in and rush out-- on the first or second day. It might be overkill but better than the not-enough of last time.
 

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Wow! I am impressed at how you are preparing yourself. That is great! I would agree that having access to an IBCLC in the first few days will help prevent problems from developing.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>leila1213</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9084554"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Wow! I am impressed at how you are preparing yourself. That is great! I would agree that having access to an IBCLC in the first few days will help prevent problems from developing.</div>
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I'm not pregnant now, this is future planning!<br><br>
In the hospital I had IBCLC's the first two days; didn't have one on the third day, at home; and finally had a full private consultation on the fourth day. I think if I'd had the private consultation on the first day we would have had more luck. Hard to say though, with DS's palate issue.<br><br>
OP, also I notice you say that only one nipple is inverted? One possibility (I recall from my reading on the subject) is to start the baby on the protruding nipple every time, and pump the inverted one AT THE SAME TIME to bring it out. It will hurt at first but shouldn't hurt too much.<br><br>
Also breastfeeding on the inverted side is more likely to hurt at first than for women with protruding nipples. It doesn't necessarily mean something is wrong (though in that case you should ask for your latch to be checked).
 

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You can use a product during pregnancy to get your nipples to come out more by the time baby comes. Avent makes this: <a href="http://www.aventamerica.com/products/breastfeeding/breastfeeding_niplette.asp" target="_blank">http://www.aventamerica.com/products...g_niplette.asp</a><br><br>
I've also read here on MDC that there are breast shells that you wear between feedings that do pretty much the same thing postpartum, but I don't know of any brand to recommend.<br><br>
I have a breastfeeding book that recommends that moms with large areaolas or flat nipples pump as well as feed to ensure your milk supply is abundant while baby is learning to nurse with your nipples.<br><br>
Nipple shields are a last resort but can save a breastfeeding relationship if nothing else works.<br><br>
You are really ahead of the game by being so prepared. I pumped for 11 months because I had this problem but not enough knowledge or support. You will do great and congrats on your pregnancy!
 

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I have inverted nipples and DS just weaned when he turned 3 <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
We had a rough start, partially due to the inverted nipples, partially due to him being a very SLEEPY baby without the motivation to do his part and draw the nipples out.<br><br>
After 3 years of nursing him, my nipples are still inverted. The nipplette claims to be able to correct the invertion, but it never worked for me and obviously wouldn't have or DS would have fixed me up. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I think the key is just drawing them out right before baby latches on.<br><br>
You can use breast shells which help to draw the nipple out, but they made me leak. I usually started him off on the less inverted one and wore the shell on the other until he switched. That way, the more problematic one was ready to go when he was. For the first one, I just rolled the nipple in my fingers and forced it out by hand right as I was drawing DS in to latch on. Are you able to draw yours out?<br><br>
Once baby is latched on, it's smooth sailing.<br><br>
DS finally learned to draw them out himself after about 6 to 8 weeks.<br><br>
I lvoe the idea of hiring a privated lactation consultant. I had one in the hospital, but she was very unreliable and busy.<br><br>
Good luck!!! Just remember YOU CAN DO THIS!! Women have been doing it since women were having babies, it isn't always easy, but you can do it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Still_Learning</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9088172"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
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Once baby is latched on, it's smooth sailing.<br></div>
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Very true. And a baby with a normal palate and a good suck should be able to latch for sure.
 

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Inverted and flat nipples here, on both breasts. We used nipple shields for the first 6 weeks, and now we are shield free!!! I kinda took a lotta crap from people about using the shields, but hey...i didnt have to supplement, my milk supply was great, he just couldnt latch on. I jsut kept trying to get him to latch on and the day before he turned 6 weeks he latched on and we never looked back!! The shields were annoying but we did get off them and everything is great now. Good luck.
 

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I used the shells with my first child--I was pretty ignorant, I went to Babies R Us and chose the things that looked the most comfortable (never had any idea that the shields could be problematic). I tried to figure out when my daughter was going to be hungry (yeah, lots of guessing and stressing) and wear them for 10-20 mins beforehand. They really helped make the nipple stand out, and then she could latch on. And for me, after nursing her 18 months, my nipples are no longer flat and #2 had no troubles in that regard. Good luck!
 

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Question-- how did you keep the shields on? I had to use one hand to keep DS from squirming away, and one hand to hold up my breast so it didn't fall out of his mouth (I tried to use towels/ pillows etc. for that but my breast would just roll off off them) so I didn't have a hand to hold the nipple shield on and it would just drop off.
 

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I have inverted nipples, according to the pinch-test, but they do protrude if I am cold. Are they truly inverted then?<br>
Will I have difficulties?<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>lolar2</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9107718"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Question-- how did you keep the shields on? I had to use one hand to keep DS from squirming away, and one hand to hold up my breast so it didn't fall out of his mouth (I tried to use towels/ pillows etc. for that but my breast would just roll off off them) so I didn't have a hand to hold the nipple shield on and it would just drop off.</div>
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I woulkd moisten them with breastmilk and they would stick or I would dab a bit of lansinoh on them to make them stick.<br><br>
I used breast shields for 8 weeks. It was incredibly painful as he would only pull the nipple through them and not much areola. If it werent for the shields we would have never made it at all. Now we are at almost 13 mths!!!!<br><br>
My suggestion is when offering breast to baby smoosh together as much as you can into a "booby sandwich" and get as much in babe's mouth as you can. Whether it is a sticky outty nip or an inny if he can get the areola tissue that will get the milk flowing.<br><br>
Teach your baby to open his mouth WIDE by saying AHHHH and opening your mouth wide at each feeding too. It's amazing that your tiny babe will mimic you on that. My son even said the "ahhh" sound <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
kellymom.com has a lot of info that helped me.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MilkTrance</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9147904"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">What is the pinch test?</div>
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<a href="http://www.breastfeedingbasics.com/html/flat_inverted.shtml" target="_blank">Here</a> is an explanation and pic.
 

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Gosh, I was about to post this exact question! My nipples have never, ever stuck out (although they are not inverted), but now that I am pregnant, they poke out a little bit some of the time. This post contains great info!
 

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I posted about my nephew's tongue tie, and my sister also has flat nipples.<br><br>
She ended up having to use a shield, partly because he has nipple confusion but partly because it is hard for him to latch on. She also tries hand pumping just before a feeding to draw out her nipple and that helps.<br><br>
Nipple shields get a bad rap but I agree that sometimes they are the only thing that can save a nursing relationship.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well I had my baby on September 4th and it was a rough start but we are doing great now!<br><br>
Right after he was born I tried to latch him on. After close to 2 hours of my midwife trying to get him to latch she pulled out the shield. I used it and he fed. For the next few days I wore the breast shells between feedings and that helped draw out the nipple. I also pumped to help draw it out before feeding him.<br><br>
We used the breast shield for a few feedings but I decided to just go for it and stop using it even though I was in sever pain (we had a bad latch and I didn't know).<br><br>
By about day 5 someone linked me a few videos on how to get a good latch and I did what they said and he latched right on.<br><br>
My nipple is still inverted but he pulls it out once he latches and he is doing well. The nipple is still very sore but I think that is from the first 5 days of bad latching.<br><br>
Thanks for all the helpul info mamas.
 
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