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I'd love to hear how you integrate art into your child's education. Do you have a time for art each day or week or do you follow your child's lead? Do you incorporate art into whatever topic/subject you are working on? Do you do formal art lessons, or just have materials for free form exploration? Do you include some type of art history education? What are your favourite resources and tips? Does your sense of your own artistic abilities influence your children's education?<br><br>
Thanks<br>
Karen
 

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A variety of art supplies are available at all times, around the house. The children are in one art class a week, with instruction, and often do crafty-open-ended-creative-art projects with our environmentally-minded playgroups. We also carry various simple art supplies (pencil crayons, paper, crayons) in the vehicle when we drive about town, for spontaneous artistic moments. I purchase notebooks for the children, the kind that have lined paper at the bottom and blank space at the top and encourage them to write stories with illustrations or keep track of things they are interested in, with drawings to show what they have seen or learned.<br><br>
There are pottery, painting, drawing, arts & crafts, and watercolor classes available all over town for children their age, including "Homeschool Art", it's just a matter of finding the time, along with all the other things they love to do. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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We incorporate art every other day. DS HATES art and its like pulling teeth to try to force him....so we don't. We offer and he will normally stay put for a few minutes and then wanders away. With DD, she is very artsy and will do nothing but color pages, cut and glue, glitter and paint all day if we let her.<br><br>
Normally, I spend two days a week with a specific project in mind. One day, its more an abstract day where I just make sure that everything is in their reach for them to use and then let them go wild with it.<br><br>
DS is starting to get really interested in photography, so I have been turning more and more of his art lessons into photograhpy lessons.
 

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Well, since my kids are on the young side, art pretty much is their schooling. I keep lots of art supplies in convinient locations. We have paints (watercolors, finger, and little pots), crayons (crayola and those expensive block ones), glitter, glitter glue, glue, scissors, colored pencils, and a variety of different papers to work on. My daughter doesn't like to draw pictures of things, she likes to do more abstract things. Sometimes I will make a suggestion, such as asking her if she will draw a picture of her family or a rainbow, but mostly I just let her go with it. We have made playdough at home before and that was a blast because I let her pick out what colors to use and taught her about mixing colors. Then I sat at the table with her and we made little animals. That was really fun as I don't often get a chance to play with playdough <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I am just starting to do more with "art history" I guess. I have a few art coffee table books that I love (Ansel Adams and Van Gough and a few others). I have started looking at these with my kids and having them tell me what the picture or painting is about or of, what colors were used, etc. I talk about the artists a bit, the names of the paintings or pictures, and such. This has been really neat as well.
 

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I keep lots of arts and craft supplies on hand for when my DDs are in the mood. I love crafting, so I am usually working on some sort of project. My girls like to help w/ that.<br><br>
I just enrolled my two oldest DDs in weekly art classes to broaden their exposure a bit. I'm not naturally drawn to art(painting, drawing, etc), so I need to seek help from art lovers/teachers to give my art loving DD more guidance than I can offer. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I have an art book geared towards kids that covers all the most famous artists. I leave that out for my kids to peruse at their leisure. I had plans to do sort of a "Picture Person" (did you have that in school?) thing w/ it, but you know how that goes. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> ("Picture Person" was when a parent volunteer would bring in a print of a famous painting and talk about it w/ the class. We had them every few months all through elementary school.)
 

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I am an artist, so we do a lot of art. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> The kids always want to do what I'm doing, so I let them. They just use cheaper supplies. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
Also scraps left over from my projects, or I buy crafting supplies as I see them on sale. They have free access to paper and writing materials, but have to ask me to get down glue or scissors. One too many accidents with those for me to leave them out.<br><br>
I love the Oriental craft kits for children. They're great for beginners and very inexpensive.
 

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We have craft/art supplies always available, plus they love to draw and color.<br><br>
For studying artists, we have read several kids books about artists, have calendars in the house displaying famous paintings, I just got a poster of a Monet print to hang in the girls' room, and we took a tour last week of the Monet exhibit that's in Raleigh. DD1 is still talking about things she learned on the tour.<br><br>
We don't have a schedule for studying art, we just do it as it comes.
 

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••••••••I run a kids art studio and I bring my kids along with me (dd is 9 and ds is 8). They get more art in their lives by doing this and the fact that my husband is a full time artist. He wears a lot of hats, teaches painting and drawing, illustrates children's books, political cartoonist, and is a sculptor.<br><br>
Do you incorporate art into whatever topic/subject you are working on?<br><br>
•••••••• No not exactly but when I see something that relates to art, I don't hold back for instance I might point out the pattern on a lady's dress and tell my kids it reminds me of a Mondrian painting or while we are playing in the forest I might say "lets build something all out of nature like Andy Goldsworthy would".<br><br>
Do you do formal art lessons, or just have materials for free form exploration?<br><br>
•••••••• My after-school arts program for elementary kids is pretty free form exploration. Meaning it's a creative space for them to pick and choose what they want to do. We have a pottery studio, painting area, computer stop animation area, recycled materials for sculpture, and much more.<br><br>
So normally I just sit down and start doing something myself and I find they want to do what Im doing so they join in. I figure they get tired of lessons from school and I have found this is the best way to draw them in.<br><br>
My daughter chooses to take my dh jr. college painting class though so that's pretty formal.<br><br>
What are your favorite resources and tips?<br><br>
••••••••••••• I think its important to have some really good quality art supplies but all the stuff the supply companies try to sell us is not necessary.<br><br>
The things I do have are good water colors and watercolor paper.<br><br>
Good quality pencils (Ticonderoga #2's)<br><br>
Good colored pencils (Berol perissma)<br><br>
Good tempera paints (Applebarrol) and a good set of brushes.<br><br>
A well lit work space.<br><br>
We used a lot of found items like huge tubes to make rain sticks or cardboard to build with. I try to encourage using things from nature or things people might normally throw away. (end rolls of paper, sign painter vinyl scraps, wood blocks from construction sites etc...)<br><br>
My best tip would be to make sure you have a place where mess is not a problem such as a garage where it's no big deal if paint happens to spill.<br><br>
I guess my other tip would be for you to be doing art right along side them. It's so fun and freeing and they love it when adult work with them and not teach at them.<br><br>
Lastly, have many things for them to choose from.<br><br>
Does your sense of your own artistic abilities influence your children's education?<br><br>
•••••••••••••••••Im not sure. I know I love to do art and so do they.<br><br>
I think I would scare them off if I gave them too much instruction.<br><br>
Every so often I will point out that something they are doing might not work but they end up doing it anyway and finding out by themselves. For instance my dd and I were making and selling homemade bumper stickers and the farmers market.<br>
She was putting red letters on a black background and when I pointed out that may be hard to read because the values were so similar, she did it anyway and found out after 1/2 hour of work that it was hard to read. She had to learn by experience.<br><br>
I have noticed that my nine year old does like taking instruction through my husband though. She will sit through a 3 hour college class and draw from the model. He's a good instructor and I think it makes her feel grown up and also it's a way to feel connected with dad.
 

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My kids do a weekly art class with a wonderful instructor who gives them access to media and materials that I just don't have the space or budget to provide. They also have free access to good-quality basic materials at home (watercolours, heavy cold-pressed paper, acrylics, pencil crayons, drawing pencils, clay, etc.). But I think the way they get most of the art in their lives is through other activities, things that one might primarily classify as science, social studies or life skills, that are undertaken artistically.<br><br>
For instance, at the gravel beach we might create an 'installation' of sticks, rocks and feathers. Or we might etch smooth stones with the points of sharp ones to create "runestones." In the garden we might make an unusual trellis or funky row markers. A birthday cake is an opportunity for, er, unusual decorating approaches. If we're collecting evergreen sprigs to identify trees, we'll then press them into clay and make trivets or pendants. If we're investigating planetary orbits, we'll use string, nails and markers to create artwork made up of circles and ellipses. Bookbinding becomes an excuse to marble some endpapers. Whittling leads to wooden sculptures and collages. Discussions and stories concerning the geography of an imaginary world lead to a 3-dimensional relief map beautifully executed on a large piece of MDF. Computer programming leads into a graphics program where kids create new objects and animated characters.<br><br>
Art seems to interweave itself throughout our lives. The more I look for it, the more I see it's there. I keep the digital camera handy for when I 'notice' art happening in the midst of other things. For instance, in the past week I've taken photos of whittled sticks, of cuisenaire rod arrays, and of the various aesthetically pleasing solutions my kids came up with to a <a href="http://greatsolutions.blogspot.com/2005/05/elevate-apple.html" target="_blank">physics challenge</a> they tried at Science Club.<br><br>
A very wise unschooling friend of mine once said "little kids are first and foremost artists." That statement, and the examples she gave to support her thesis, have caused me to look for, and support, the natural creative urges that children express just as they live their lives. They say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. As a parent I've found that art is too... and that my making an effort to behold and appreciate the art in the everyday has made my children enthusiastic and habitual creative spirits.<br><br>
Miranda
 

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If I took their drawing pads away I might have to face a firing squad! My dd is forever with a sketch pad and pencil on her person and my ds is also constantly drawing on whatever he can...including any written work. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> My dd taught herself to draw using numerous "how to draw" books. Her latest purchase was "How to Draw Anime" and she is producing a wonderful line of faires and anime characters now. I am always telling her to "Go wash your hands..you got pencil all over them!" Most days it's on her nose and face where she used her pencil dust covered hands to scratch. Art supplies are always on hand and they can use them anytime they want. They both paint, draw, work with clay, sew, scrapbook, and build with numerous media on a daily basis...and in the car...and on vacation...and.....you get the picture. My hubby and I are both very artistic though so we encourage the arts whenever we can. Hubby was an art major 3 credits away from his 4 year degree before he switched to computer science (because it pays more) and I am a professional seamstress/desinger.<br><br>
The kids have also taken the odd art class and clay class but I've found they have learnt more on their own than in the classes I paid for. The way I teach any art is by immitation...I have them draw or paint or sculpt using another artists work to guide them. Over time they work out the techniques that work best for them on their own. Right now they both are trying to talk me into taking them to a kids sewing club at our local sewing machine dealer.
 

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We unschool so I don't know if you're looking from answers in that vein.<br><br>
However, I love art. It's a part of my life. I'm not so much a creator as an admirer. LOL I have many art history books (some textbooks, yes) and prints of famous and not-so-famous pieces. We visit museums when we travel. DH and I will take turns if she is getting bored or wants to do something else. I take many photos of museums I visit so she can always look later.<br><br>
We have quality art supplies: good pencils, clay, paints, etc. I encourage expression <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> She's been playing with clay since she was a toddler. It's her favorite medium.<br><br>
She has started taking a pottery class every other Saturday. She is a bit disappointed that they aren't learning techniques yet...just messing around with the clay for now, which certainly has value. But I think as the class progresses, she will learn how to make the things she wants to make.<br><br>
She goes through phases where she will sit down with me and sew or crochet. I don't do this often but there is a sewing box which she knows she has full access to.<br><br>
She likes paper crafts and likes to draw. Her drawings decorate our apartment <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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My kids are always working on some project that they started on their own volition. One thing that we do though...we visit art museums often. My dc are 6, 4 and 2.5. We started taking them since our 6yo was an infant. For the past few years dh and I wound up doing "drive by art appreciation" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> But now we bring a sketch pad and colored pencils for the 6yo and 4yo. They find something they like and sit down and draw it.
 

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I have to admit that I hate art. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">:<br><br>
I don't like to draw, paint, color, etc.<br><br>
I don't enjoy dancing or making music.<br><br>
I don't like sculpting, carving, or sewing.<br><br>
I am not at all into art appreciation. My dh, who is an artist (and has a BFA to prove it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> ), is constantly annoyed with me for saying things like, "That's not art!" or "I can't believe someone would spend thousands of dollars to buy THAT!" ETA: I do not say thes things about stuff my dh has created. I say it about stuff like a bicycle wheel stuck on a stool, which is supposedly a famous work of art. He says that my idea of good art is something that looks good in a frame on my wall.<br><br>
He's kinda right. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
I don't know why I am this way but I have never been artistically inclined. I like words and I am a social worker by trade, so I am very practical-minded.<br><br>
HOWEVER!<br><br>
I feel like I have missed out on something by not enjoying/appreciating art and the creative process, so I have tried to make sure my kids have lots of artistic outlets. We regularly put on music and dance. I have lots and lots of art supplies (paint, glue, markers, crayons, colored pencils, different types of paper and fabric, needle and thread, knitting needles, yarn, funky scissors, modeling clay, etc.) available for them. I sent my oldest dd to drama camp.<br><br>
My two girls are pretty artsy. My bio daughter seems to have inherited my dh's love of drawing. My older daughter, recently adopted, learned to be very crafty at her orphanage and constantly amazes me with the things she makes (clothes for her dolls, cups and bowls and utensils out of paper pulp, jewelry, etc.).<br><br>
My son, also adopted, has zero interest in art. He's still young (somewhere between 3.5 and 5), but his interest in art starts and ends with about 20 seconds of scribbling. He's the all-boy type who prefers to spend his time crashing toy cars into things.<br><br>
I recently decided that I want my kids to have some handicraft/handwork skills, and I decided to be an example by taking up one myself. I am learning to crochet. My greatest fear in this regard is that I will end up with a lot of decorative knick-knacks and very little that is actually useful! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
So, I don't really conciously incorporate art into our day, but I do have it available for the kids and I am going to try to deliberately introduce some handicrafts.<br><br>
Namaste!
 

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Dear Karen,<br><br>
We incorporate the arts into everything - from Math to history to science, etc. While we have followed a progression in hands-on arts, it really hasn't been the traditional idea of art instruction. We simply learn to use different media in different years. So one year we do crayons, the next pencils, the next pastels, then charcoal, etc. (with a similar progression in painting)<br><br>
While we're more child-led than a school, I would say that while they have the option of creating what they want with whatever supplies are in the house, there's a limit on the minimum - something my eldest "explored" when he decided for a while that he "couldn't" draw. During that time I didn't require him to draw very much, but I did draw with him and help bring him back to drawing through diagramming his science experiemnts. He liked painting and modeling, so we did more of those and less drawing.<br><br>
I think that given exposure to multiple outlets such as drama, music, writing, crafts, and visual arts, most children will find some form of creativity that appeals to them.<br><br>
Oh, to answer your other question, we don't do art history per se, but include it in history or social studies - plus we regularly visit art museums whenever we can. I loved when we hit upon a great exhibit of hats in one museum - from all over the world! My little one just went googly-eyed over an African hat.<br><br>
Anyway, here's a bunch of articles and links on our approach: <a href="http://www.wonderhs.com/wonderhomeschool/id16.html" target="_blank">The Arts</a><br><br>
Best wishes,<br><br>
Lucie
 

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My 3 yr old dd loves art. Like someone else said, at this point art is the majority of her homeschooling. We work on counting and the alphabet too but art is her favorite.<br><br>
I give her elmers glue so she can put it on construction paper and then I sprinkle glitter on it and shake it off.<br><br>
She puts elmers glue on construction paper and sticks little colored cotton balls or felt shapes onto them. We talk about the different colors or shapes. She knows all of them now<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
She's learning how to use scissors now so I'll give her a peice of construction paper and let her cut around the edges<br><br>
She likes drawing with chalk, crayons, and finger painting. We usually finger paint in the bathtub since it's so messy.<br><br>
Some other ideas:<br><br>
Let them draw with a white crayon and then go over it with paint.<br><br>
For older kids this was one of my faves, use various colors of crayons to cover every inch of the paper, then go over it with black crayon, then use something to scrape designs into the paper.<br><br>
Make your own pinyata. Blow up a balooon, mix together equal parts of flour & water, rip up newspaper into strips and dip into the flour mixture, apply all over the balloon, several layers. Some people dry in between layers. Then when it's dry Stick a needle inside to pop the balloon. Cut a hole at the top to fill if you want. You can paint it or use paper mache squares and pencils to glue all over it.<br><br>
We used to do the paper mache squares/glue/pencil thing on construction paper too when I was a kid.<br><br>
I also remember using those plastic beads (not sure what they're called), making designs with them and baking them in the oven to melt together.<br><br>
making snowflakes by folding up paper and cutting shapes into the edges and open up.<br><br>
I can't wait until dd is older so we can do some of these<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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The best way I have found is to get out there and view it in real life with their eyes.<br><br><br>
Go as many places that have art as possible and to point out every type of art you see... so they know it's more than painting or drawing on paper.
 

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we keep supplies on hand and once a month we host a homeschool art day at our house. There are lots of materials available, and one mom from our group offers a technique to show the kids./
 

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We have art supplies taking up 2 cabinets in the kitchen, as well as a little playhouse out back which is primarily a kid art space. Free access to paint, markers, crayons, scissors, paper, glue, collage supplies... They could do art all the time if they wanted too.<br><br>
My dd1 though, she isn't so into it. She goes in spurts, for a while she was planning to fill a sketchbook with bird pictures, but it isn't her main focus. It interferes with standing on her head. She likes to create stories with her play, she's less interested in creating picture stories.<br><br>
I have hope for the little one, though. She likes to experiment with color using markers and paints. She seems to be more interested in sitting and working on something at the table, or painting in the playhouse.<br><br>
We do have art time in our loose schedule, but dd doesn't always want to do something particularly exciting. One day we made sock puppets. They were fabulous, until the 2yo pulled all the felt features off of them and then they were just socks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:. This week, dd1 just wanted to take out her markers and "make pictures like dd2" meaning spirally scribbles. I do not judge, of course, that's what she felt like doing that day.<br><br>
There is a Spanish class at our library, for free, twice a month. They learn about Latin American cultures. I don't know how much spanish they absorb, but one of the teachers is a professional artist and has fabulous ideas for projects. Dd always likes to go, and is very proud of her creations.<br><br>
We also visit galleries for field trips. We look at paintings and talk about what we see and what we think when we look at them. I try to pick books with interesting illustrations, and spend time looking at the pictures as we read. I'm also a bit arty myself.<br><br>
We have quite a bit of music and dance in our lives as well. We like to take dd1 to the ballet a couple of times a year, she takes a class too. We're in Music Together, and Dh is a jazz guitarist and plays a lot.
 
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