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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At 15 months, DD was saying mama, dada, thank you, hi, that, cat. Now, at 18 months and since I have introduced more and more signs, she only really says, "this," "that" and dada. She babbles, points and grunts for things, as well as signs for many things. But she has a lot less words now and does not "try" to speak like she used to. AS for everything else, She is loving, affectionate, loves to be read to, and she pretends really well with her babies. No other signs of delays but I am really worried about her speech. Am I being paranoid? I will probably bring it up at her 18 month appointment, as well as delay her mmr another 6 months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>alegna</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10742565"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Has she been vaccinated in that time frame?<br><br>
-Angela</div>
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not since 9 months
 

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Totally normal. I'm a therapist who works with kids birth to five and have seen this sooo many times, including with my DS. He had lots of words at about 15 or 16 mos, but then back-burnered talking and reverted to signing for a few months. One theory is that the brain prioritizes the acquisition of newer skills, so things that seem "mastered"--like those few words--get set aside to make room for all the gross motor, fine motor and social-emotional stuff that happens in toddlers' development at that time. (This is Dr. T. Berry Brazelton's "Touchpoints" model).<br><br>
The language should start to really blossom again by about 20-24 mos, but YMMV, of course, as every child is unique.
 

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The speech therapist that I spoke with about DS said this is normal, with in a range of course. You can always get her evaluated through your state for free no matter if you decide to vaccinate or not.
 

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My son did the same thing!! I was worried and frustrated about it. It really scared me because it never happened with my daughters. All the research I did (I wish I had kept the sources so I can reassure myself if it happens with any future children... I should look for it again!) showed it was normal. It still worried me but I could relax a <i>little</i> more. Suddenly, around 23 months he started a language explosion & his old words are back and he's learning new ones every day!<br><br>
Edited to add...<br>
My worry with the loss of words was autism (made worse by the fact my husband is an autism support worker so it's a constant topic of conversation around here!) but what my son really taught me through all this was that there is so much more to communication than just speech... and the ability to communicate is what is important, not just speech.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Eben'sMama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10742604"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Totally normal. I'm a therapist who works with kids birth to five and have seen this sooo many times, including with my DS. He had lots of words at about 15 or 16 mos, but then back-burnered talking and reverted to signing for a few months. One theory is that the brain prioritizes the acquisition of newer skills, so things that seem "mastered"--like those few words--get set aside to make room for all the gross motor, fine motor and social-emotional stuff that happens in toddlers' development at that time. (This is Dr. T. Berry Brazelton's "Touchpoints" model).<br><br>
The language should start to really blossom again by about 20-24 mos, but YMMV, of course, as every child is unique.</div>
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This is what I was going to say, only I wouldn't have sounded as intelligent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>nextcommercial</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10743264"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">This is what I was going to say, only I wouldn't have sounded as intelligent.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/biglaugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="laugh">:<br><br>
That's funny as crap...<br><br><br>
THANKS EVERYONE FOR YOUR ENCOURAGING WORDS <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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My DD did something kind of like this. She stopped saying a lot of words and just focussed on pointing at things and saying, "Dat," which meant that she wanted me to tell her what things were. This period got so boring for me, but then she reached a point where she actually started SAYING all of the words that she was learning during the "dat" phase. And that was so beautiful to witness--totally worth the months of having to identify everything in sight.
 

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Sorrry to hyjack the thread, but...<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Eben'sMama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10742604"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">One theory is that the brain prioritizes the acquisition of newer skills, so things that seem "mastered"--like those few words--get set aside to make room for all the gross motor, fine motor and social-emotional stuff that happens in toddlers' development at that time. (This is Dr. T. Berry Brazelton's "Touchpoints" model).</div>
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Could this theory explain why DS got all the steps of potty learning, then as soon as I thought we could stop using diapers he completely lost interest?
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>eepster</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10744455"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Sorrry to hyjack the thread, but...<br><br><br>
Could this theory explain why DS got all the steps of potty learning, then as soon as I thought we could stop using diapers he completely lost interest?</div>
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Yep. Totally. It also explains why kids always seem to "regress" with sleep issues, eating pickiness, overall crankiness or clinginess, just before they have a huge developmental burst. Seriously, if you haven't read Touchpoints, it's awesome. He is a bit mainstream when it comes to things like vaxing, but when it comes to child development and social-emotional development, he's right on. I had the chance to study closely with him, and Berry is such an amazing, kind, wise person. He just adores babies and kids and that love shines through in his work.
 
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