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Discussion Starter #1
or should I be concerned?<br>
My youngest has been a battle for us, he had fluid from birth and flunked every tymp, though he didn't have any infections. He was unresponsive to noise and there were differing opinions from all of our docs, all 5 of them, from deafness, just fluid, we don't know but don't get you hopes up... He had tubes at 10 mo and there began his infections and almost constant screaming, I find out later that the ENT put in metal tubes, even after we had discussed only plastic because of a family allergy to metals. He is getting new tubes in 2 weeks because the current ones are blocked and our new ENT ( our 4th) is convinced that he is having an allergic reaction to the metal tubes and rejecting them, hence the constant pain.<br>
Finn is all over the place with his response to sound, sometimes he will appear to hear things that are very quiet and other times he doesn't respond at all. He is our 5th and noone else has this problem. The audiologist is convinced that it is selective hearing and I disagree, he has been this way since I can remember. He has other oddities about him, from textural to the fact htat he doesn't make more than 5 sounds .... the audio says that if he doesn't start to say words soon they will have to send him for an eval.<br>
He will say mama( though that is in response to me and everything else) and boo ( for boob) and ba (for everything else on the planet) My other boys were late talkers, but they would babble unintelliglible 'words' and sounds, Finn doesn't really babble, he repeats ba for everything.<br>
I do not want to invite EI into my house, I have 2 friends who have done this and it was very stressful, there has been no noticeable improvement and it ahs been constant battles for both families ( they are in different states). I am not sure how long to adjust for prematurity for speech... he was only 5 weeks early but he was for all intents and purposes deaf until 10 mo.
 

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There is something I read recently where the studies have come back about ear tubes and verbal development. I'll go find the article and edit this post with the link...
 

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How old is he now?<br><br>
His lack of babbling and the fact that he was essentially deaf until 10 months, and has had iffy hearing since then (due to the metal tubes and ear infections) could account for his language delay. He is indicating signs of a delay simply by his lack of sounds. His range of sounds (only 5) appear to be far under his age (even if you adjust for prematurity).<br><br>
I'm quite conservative about speech/language development, so take what I say with that in mind. I personally would have him evaluated by a speech language pathologist 3-4 weeks after his new tubes are in (you need to wait for the swelling to go down and for them to do another hearing test). A good speech pathologist can really help. If you don't want EI in your home, you can do private speech therapy. Sometimes EI will offer center based therapy too. Honestly, with 5 kids, he might be better of going somewhere!<br><br>
You might also look at sensory issues (Sensational Kids or Raising a Sensory Smart Child are good ones for infants/young toddlers; The Out of Sync Child is the classic). Given his early history, he's at risk for those too.<br><br>
His differing reactions to sound could be a fluid issue - if he's got a lot of fluid, then his hearing would not be great, if his ears are clear then he can hear well. But, they could also be an auditory processing issue, an inability to filter sounds, or ..... who knows?<br><br>
Let's hope the ENTs get the hearing cleared up and you can get some answers!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
He is 20 months old, he will be 2 on August 6th... he will sometimes copy what sounds we make, and other times he will appear to not hear us. Though he had plenty of fluid prior to the tubes, they claim that he has only had blocked tubes( meaning i suppose that the opening to the tube is blocked with gunk). I am only getting more concerned now because he is becoming very difficult to deal with, he has breath-holding episodes and I wonder if they are more prolific because he cannot readily communicate.<br>
Thank you so much for the reading recommendations, I will get to that and hopefully in the meantime our ENT will figure things with his tubes out.<br>
laura
 

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If both people you know who have had bad EI experiences are in different states than your EI could be wonderful...it varies so much from state to state and even district to district. EI for us was a full evaluation, which we took ds to, they did not come here, and then center based therapy (he qualified for speech and occupational therapy), ei only came to our house twice for home visits...and these were just them coming and showing us stuff we could do to help him along. EI was absolutely wonderfull for us. He is now over 3 and has went on to the school system as he has aged out of EI.
 

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My ds has a similar, but less severe ear problem than your ds. I've been wondering some of the same things. With my ds, his language started early, but is now quite a bit delayed, especially his articulation. Since dd has severe communication problems, we've been quite worried about ds.<br><br>
We just had his ears retested since the infections have finally stopped. He passed his last test, but his language is just so slow, and he does that weird not hearing things sometimes that you describe. I really think knowing and giving appropriate therapies can help children who have hearing-based delays.<br><br>
I was told that all kids with corrected ear issues will be caught up by the time they are 8. This, however, doesn't provide me much comfort with the family history of communication problems.<br><br>
At any rate, I have had tremendously pleasant and useful experiences with EI, so I will be taking him back there. EI is different in every state and even agency to agency, so I'd be hesitant to write all of them off because of a few experiences. However, you can easily duplicate what they will do by getting an eval at with a speech pathologist or developmental pediatrician.
 

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Hi,<br><br>
This might be way off base, but have you considered sign language. My DS has struggled with language issues and is seeing a speech therapist. I had started using sign with him early on but didn't keep up with it, I have since started using it with my 1 year old and she has a few signs. I wish I had kept it up with my DS I think it would have helped with his frustration in communication with us. I think he wanted to communicate and would get frustrated because he couldn't find the words to use to express what he wanted.<br><br>
HTH<br>
Jess
 

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Finn does understand signs, I am fluent and have signed to him since birth, he will not sign anything unless he is nursing<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">... He will sign boo( milk) and Mommy and Daddy but only while at the breast. He has signed giraffe, butterfly and more but only a few time in response to a picture or many, many prompts. He will nod in response to a yes or no question, though not at all consistently. if he is prompted to sign more for food he will always respond with screaming and throwin himself to the floor.... I have helped him to sign more and this will end with more screaming and crying. I ahve no idea what makes communication so stressful for him but I would love to understand so that we could help him....<br>
laura
 
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