Mothering Forum banner
41 - 51 of 51 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
So is it a scam or not? (confused)
Yes. It is a scam. It's so similar to table salt as to be almost identical. It contains iron oxide to give it a pink colour.
Salt is not contained in your DNA, as someone on here has suggested.
I have read about "Sole Drinks" on other boards. These drinks are laughable. Don't do it. Waste of time and waste of salt. We should be eating LESS salt not drinking salt water and thinking it's magical.
Good old white table salt sodium chloride is fine and cheap. Buy Himalayan salt if you wish but it's 4 times the price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by nia82 View Post

All I can say is that American store is nasty. I don't want iodine nor anti caking chemicals. I like the pink salt. I like sea salt though I'm concerned with the amount of pollution in today's world.
I have those same concerns, nia82. I'm looking into this because my doctor has said that Himalayan salt is free of those problems (as is Celtic sea salt). He mentioned the absence of added fluoride as a virtue as well.

My question is whether these health benefits are demonstrable in terms of evidence, and whether any claims of the supposed dangers of using Himalayan salt (beyond the caveat that salt should be consumed in moderation) are supported by reasonably analyzed facts.

I certainly don't want to make anyone feel less happy about their purchases (or falsely reassured, for that matter). I'm only interested in what's true.
Hi,
anti-caking agents do you no harm.
You don't want iodine? Why? If you don't have any then you'll be in a lot of trouble.
fluoride is fine too. If you don't like it then you'll be shocked to learn that nearly all toothpastes contain fluoride (good for the teeth, you see)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Actually, the Himalayas do extend into Pakistan. There are six countries in which the Himalayan mountains run, and Pakistan is one of them. For instance, K2 (the second highest mountain on Earth and in the Himalayan range) is on the border between Pakistan and China.

Geography of the mountain range aside, I don't think the salt comes from the actual mountains. I was in a really cool salt shop and their literature said it came from near the Himalayas but not in them ( I think maybe 200 miles away, or something close to that?). I'm sure the name "Best Himalayan Salt Lamp Review & Benefits of himalayan salt lamp" was coined because it sounds much more exotic, and is more marketable, than "Pakistani Salt."
I think of it as being like when i went to BC Canada and all the tourist spots had "Canadian Maple Syrup" for sale in expensive little bottles. Sure, it was from Canada, but from clear across the country.

And yep, it is definitely mined, but then all non-sea salt needs to be. This particular "sea" salt is from really ancient sea beds: about 600 million years old. The salt is supposed to be very, very pure as far as salt deposits go (97% sodium chloride as opposed to a more common 94% in mined salt), but I don't know the actual mineral makeup. As for pollution and other chemical contaminates: I think it is pretty logical that the deposits, despite not being in the Himalayas, have been well protected deep within the Earth for millions of years and are probably as un-polluted as it gets.

The mine is supposed to be the second largest salt mine in the world. It is the Khewra salt mine, and there is lots of info on it if you do a web search. It's been a source of salt for people since before 300 BC, and actual mining started in the 1200's AD (I think There is a lot of interesting history surrounding it. Apparently it is a huge tourist attraction, and thousands of people visit it every year. There is a beautiful mosque inside made out of salt blocks: it is really lovely.

As for the actual mineral content and the fluoride concerns... i don't know, honestly. Some sources out there say it is really high in fluoride, and other sources say otherwise. Probably the only way to be sure would be to find someone independent, who doesn't have anything to gain or lose by the results, and get a good analysis done. Since many of the sites who are providing the analysis are either selling the salt or are vehemently against it it is hard to know who is telling the truth.

And as to whether it is this amazing miracle salt that all the hype would lead us to believe... I think probably not. It seems to me that the health industry loves to promote cool products, and neat things like this really take off on the health retail market and become a big fad. Some of the claims they make about the salt do seem a little "scammish."
The salt itself is beautiful, the lamps are gorgeous, the salt serving platters are a cool idea, the salt cooking platforms are awesome, and I'm sure it tastes lovely. But at the end of the day I don't think of it as one of those "must have" health items. There are lots of really great sources of salt out there, and this is but one of them.
[email protected] I agree with you.
Actually, I can tell you from my personal experience that it really works. It make my house so appealing too. Moreover I have feeling that I am getting health benefit from himalayan salt lamp!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,143 Posts
No, Himalayan Salt lamps are definitely not a scam. Tons of research have proven how beneficial they can be in removing harmful ions from to air to help those with allergies and even asthma breathe better.
The article you linked does not contain any research or links to research articles which support the claims made by advocates of salt lamps.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
when its about it being salt, No Himalayan rock salts is a real salt some claims Himalayan rock salts does taste better but for me they taste the same there are some medical claims about himalayan salt but alsonot sure because its still not proven but what is Himalayan salt lamp it legit can use to deodorize room ,i have 5 cats and 1 dog and sometimes it can get my condo so stinky but himalayan salt Lamp is effective removing smells
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Pink Himalayan salt is chemically similar to table salt. It contains up to 98 percent sodium chloride. The rest of the salt consists of trace minerals, such as potassium, magnesium, and calcium. These give the salt its light pink tint. These minerals also explain why Himalayan salt tastes different from regular table salt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Salt Supplier in Karachi Salt n Salt 360 is the largest network of food and industrial grade salt manufacturers, suppliers, and exporters serving national and international clients from Pakistan.

Founded in 2007, Salt n Salt 360 started its operations as salt miners and processers. Over the years, the company has grown into one of the largest networks of Himalayan Rock Salt products' manufacturers, suppliers, and exporters in Pakistan with its export operations in the Middle East, Europe, North and South America.

Our range of salt products encompasses common table and industrial salts of various kinds, salt lamps, salt tiles, etc.
 
41 - 51 of 51 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top