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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
MIL just bought all 3 kids some polyester blanket sleepers at Sears. We keep our house very cold at night in the winter to save on heating bills, so we're planning to layer with cotton underneath to keep everyone toasty. The brand name is Planetzzz. It doesn't say anything on the package about then NOT being chemically treated. The package reads "this fabric is made of flame resistant fabric." Does this mean inherently flame resistant? There is no phone # on the package to call the company, no website either. I guess I could call Sears and somehow track down a number, but I'm hoping to avoid the hassle. If I'm not completely sure they're chemical-free, I'll return them.
 

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What kind of fabric is it?<br><br>
The only natural fiber that's flame resistant, AFAIK, is wool. Cotton is never flame resistant naturally; only if chemically treated. There are some inherently flame resistant synthetics, but they are expensive and brand-name technologies, so it would advertise that it's made with Tyndale, Consoltex, Indura, etc.<br><br>
I'd bet money that those are chemically treated, though; to my understanding, all flame-resistant children's pjs are <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They're the fleecy polyester type, with feet and zippers. I know that Carter's poly sleepers aren't chemically treated, also Dr. Denton's aren't, which Sears used to have. I'm wondering if the company name changed to Planetzzz, because the packaging and price are the same. I thought I read that polyester is flame resistant, but maybe I'm wrong. I think I might end up returning these and either going with Carters or doing layered cotton instead. These just seem so nice and warm, and we really do keep our house COLD at night through the winter.
 

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Polyester will melt if it is exposed to flames; it is a petroleum product and essentially plastic.<br><br>
I did do a search and found this:<br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">As someone who works for a children's clothing manufacturer, I can tell you the short answer to your question is no, you cannot get footed/fleece pajamas that are not treated with flame retardant. To produce and sell such an item is against the law. You can check out the website for the Consumer Product Safety Commission for more details. Sleepwear without flame retardant is generally made of 100% cotton and is always labeled ''wear snug fitting'' to adhere to legal requirements. You might find some that are zippered as opposed to pull over, but I don't think I've ever seen them. If you can skip the footies, I would just get fleece ''sweat'' type clothes and have your kids sleep in them with long-johns and warm socks. We're getting cold too!</td>
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I was told by the manager at the Carter's outlet in Kansas that their pjs are chemically treated, but he could have been wrong. We don't use any fleece pj's in our home. After the study finding those chems in most breastmilk, we steer clear.<br><br>
I hear you on the cosy factor, though! Land's End used to make fleece "play suits" that are not treated because they're not marketed as pajamas, but I'm not sure if they still do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay, they're going back to the store! I like the fleece sweats over long johns idea. Thanks so much for your replies, mrzmeg. My older two wore blanket sleepers a lot last winter, but they were second or third hand, so I hope that means that if they were treated that lots of the chemicals were washed out. I hate the idea that I exposed them to that horrible toxic stuff!
 

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Just an FYI, if Dr. Denton's has changed names then they have within the last year because I bought the babe some footed sleepers at Sears right after Christmas last year and they were still Dr. D's.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Flame resistant material such as %100 polyester:<br><br>
Is resistant to ignition by small flames<br>
Is more difficult to ignite than untreated cotton<br>
Self-extinguishes after exposure to a small flame<br>
Shrinks away from heat sources<br>
Flames travel more slowly and cover a smaller area<br>
Upward flame spread tends to be slow, sparing the face and respiratory system<br>
Flame resistance does not diminish with repeated laundering<br><br>
Non-flame resistant materials including untreated cotton and cotton blends:<br><br>
Ignite at a lower temperature than polyester and other flame resistant fabrics<br>
Continues to burn even after ignition source is removed<br>
Flames spread rapidly<br>
Flames spread upward increasing the risk of burns to the face and inhalation injury<br><br>
Alternative to Flame Resistant Sleepwear<br><br>
Tight Fitting Garments, Long Underwear and Ski Pajamas<br><br>
Reduces the risk of contact with flames<br>
Decreases air between the garment and the child. Air is required for flaming<br>
Must fit tightly at wrist, ankel and waist<br>
Must be almost skin tight<br>
Must be purchased to fit the child now, not large to fit later<br>
Burn injuries may be less severe with tight-fitting garments than with looser fitting garments<br><br>
What if Your Child's Clothing Catches on Fire?<br><br>
Stop, drop and Roll. All children should know how to do this. Practise with them often.<br>
Remove clothing from the burned area. If the material sticks to the skin, cool it, and leave it alone<br>
Cool the burned area for a short time with cool, not cold water. Never put ice or cold water on a burn. Ice and cold water can make the burn worse<br>
Cover the burn with a clean, dry cloth. Keep the child warm and calm<br>
Call 911 or other emergency number. Seek medical attention.</td>
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from <a href="http://www.luhs.org/depts/injprev/FireBurn/burninj.htm#fact" target="_blank">http://www.luhs.org/depts/injprev/Fi...rninj.htm#fact</a>
 

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My parents found snug-fitting, snap-front, footed PJs for DD at Gymboree last winter. They were marked as such (intended to be snug) and not chemically treated. We tend to look for those, then just buy them a size larger because DD has some chunky thighs <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I haven't started looking yet this year -- I'm using cotton pants with the cuff at the bottom and socks (tucked underneath) if it's cold.<br><br>
I hate that they put chemicals in darn near everything <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br>
Grrrr
 

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I am confused <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/innocent.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shy"> , so when they say 'flame resistant' on polyester, are they talking about polyester's flame resistant properties, or that they have been chemically treated too?<br><br>
I week ago, I went on a very futile search for untreated fleecy footeds. I almost bought a pair anyway, thinking I would wash on really hot water a few times to get out the chemicals. Sure glad I didn't go on that theory!!!
 

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I hate chemicals in sleepwear and mattress pads, etc. too.<br><br>
However, we had a house fire last year (not our fault - the house next to us burned) and the flames were moments from coming through the wall by where my baby was sleeping when I woke up and ran out of the house with her.<br><br>
So, it's a trade-off in my mind. Fires do happen. I wish that manufacturer's would develop and use a safer flame-retardant fabric and/or treatment.
 

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House fires are very scary. However it is much more common for a person (child or adult) to die of smoke inhalation then to actually burn to death.<br><br>
"The majority of fire-related deaths (70 percent) are caused by smoke inhalation of the toxic gases produced by fires. Actual flames and burns only account for about 30 percent of fire-related deaths and injuries."<br><a href="http://wo-pub2.med.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/WebObjects/PublicPediatrics.woa/1/wa/viewContent?contentID=2977&wosid=10NHvYgUXbDs3jNlmiaYMM" target="_blank">http://wo-pub2.med.cornell.edu/cgi-b...XbDs3jNlmiaYMM</a><br><br>
Other reports are as high as 80 or 90%<br><br>
My Dh is a firefighter and all the fire related deaths he has seen, have been caused by smoke inhalation.<br>
Chances are, if the flames are so close that the fire resistance is needed, it's too late. I know that is rather a gruesome thing to say but, sadly, it's true.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>lilylove</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">House fires are very scary. However it is much more common for a person (child or adult) to die of smoke inhalation then to actually burn to death.</div>
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I assume this would also be true for injuries then. Thanks so much for the information. I did not know this, and I'm a little overly-cautious about fire these days, as you can imagine!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
"I am confused , so when they say 'flame resistant' on polyester, are they talking about polyester's flame resistant properties, or that they have been chemically treated too?"<br><br>
I'm confused about that too, so I'm not taking chances! I'll be returning the polyester sleepers. I went to Target and bought each child two sets of sweats for $4 per piece--they're 80% cotton, 20 poly, nice and thick and warm. We'll layer them over cotton long johns or snug cotton jammies. I wish I could afford something like Hanna Andersson jammies for them, but there's no way! I think this is a good solution--keeps them warm and still in almost 100% natural fibers.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>3boobykins</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I wish I could afford something like Hanna Andersson jammies for them, but there's no way! I think this is a good solution--keeps them warm and still in almost 100% natural fibers.</div>
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I completely agree and will be doing the same <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
On a side note: I was so proud of my MIL this weekend. She bought DD pjs and made sure the tag said "snug-fitting...not flame restistant". She tends not to listen to DH and I when we tell her things, but this time she was on it! She even bought them a size larger, so they wouldn't be too snug <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Isn't it great when mil's respect our requests? Mine is great about it--I got lucky in the in-law dept.!
 
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