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<p>We are moving from our second 'easy' homeschooling state to Pa.<span><img alt="yikes2.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/yikes2.gif" style=""></span></p>
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<p>So, obviously without posting anything incriminating<span><img alt="bag.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/bag.gif" style=""></span><span>, is it really that big of a deal not to register? </span></p>
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<p><span>Does anyone have any experience with this, or know someone who does?</span></p>
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<p>I think I would rather live with the stress of not registering than the stress of jumping through all their hoops.<span><img alt="nut.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/nut.gif" style=""></span></p>
 

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<p>In not in PA but how close to the border of another state will you be?  Close enough to claim state 'x' instead?  Can you keep your old state?  I know in *my* state no one ever checks the records so you could move here and no would ever be the wiser and I could move away and still be listed as HS here.</p>
 

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<p>Well you could always try and if you get busted hopefully you just register and jump through hoops. I would want to know what happens when you don't register,and compare it to the hassle of hoop jumping.</p>
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<p>If I were living in a really strict state(like one that only allowed medical exmeptions for vaccines) I would move to a state that had laws I liked.</p>
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<p>I look at homes nationwide and only consider ones in states  that have good homeschool/vaccine laws,and ofcourse allow backyard chickens!</p>
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<p>Best wishes!</p>
 

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<p>I know people who do it, but I'm not sure what the risks are.  I do know some registered homeschoolers and unschoolers here in PA and they all tell me that it seems like a bunch of hoops, but the reality is quite easy.  Good luck!</p>
 

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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Love</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1283433/is-it-common-to-homeschool-underground-in-pa#post_16092065"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>We are moving from our second 'easy' homeschooling state to Pa.<span><img alt="yikes2.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/yikes2.gif" style=""></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p>So, obviously without posting anything incriminating<span><img alt="bag.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/bag.gif" style=""></span><span>, is it really that big of a deal not to register? </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span>Does anyone have any experience with this, or know someone who does?</span></p>
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<p>I think I would rather live with the stress of not registering than the stress of jumping through all their hoops.<span><img alt="nut.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/nut.gif" style=""></span></p>
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Back when I first started HSing and was reading Growing Without Schooling magazine there were quite a few articles and letters from and about people in PA HSing underground due to the state regulations. Can't say anything about now though. As far as HSing underground in the US this is my general knowledge. Ya get caught, you register as a HSer and you never hear from them again but that is in states where  they do not have the right to deny you.</p>
 

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<p>Does anyone know what the penalty is in PA?</p>
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<p>I don't think they can deny you, but I have heard stories of parents getting charged with truancy, which I think is a fine and possibly jail time in severe cases.</p>
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<p>I have also heard that informally, you can used a religious freedom law to prevent the law from applying to your family.</p>
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<p>We will live pretty close to the state line.  I think we will be in Lancaster County, but I think it would be hard to have residency somewhere else, when it comes down to it.</p>
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<p>Annettemarie does live in PA, as do I.  Everyone who I have talked to (including radical unschoolers) has said that the PA laws are not that big of a deal.  Initially, I felt overwhelmed, but not after talking to a few people.  We live in western PA & it is a great place. I would not move away from here just b/c of homeschooling laws.  I bet that the religious law, if it exists, is for the Amish.</p>
 

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<p>yeah, it *has* to be PA.  i know!  <span><img alt="orngtongue.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif"></span></p>
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<p>Well, you are making me feel better.  I suppose it is one of those things that might not seem so bad after you are used to it. </p>
<p>I had a hard enough time moving here, and having to just register, after not having to anything in our first state.  I just like the gov't to leave us alone, I guess.</p>
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<p>i just keep thinking, there has to be *some* loophole somewhere...</p>
 

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<p>i live in pa too.....in an area where homeschooling is REALLY growing.  i personally do not know anyone here who homeschools without reporting..........they all say that once you get the hang of it, all of the strict record keeping and reporting isnt all that bad.  personally, i'm dreading it (i dont have to report yet), but i know that 1)it will keep me motivated to stay on top of everything 2)they arent really asking me to do much that i wouldnt plan on doing anyway. </p>
 

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<p>From what I've heard, it sounds worse on paper than it is in reality. (That's how I find it in NY; officially there are lots of "regulations" but they're pretty easy in practice in my experience.) </p>
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<p>However, if you'll be close enough to New Jersey to either live in New Jersey or have a legal address in New Jersey, they have no required letter of intent or anything. </p>
 

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<p>It's not about easy vs hard, it's about personal freedom and the rights of parents to educate as they see fit without Gov interference and unnecessary hoops. Sure you can get used to the hoops, especially if you don't view them as that big of a deal.</p>
 

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<p>Personally, I wouldn't try to fly under the radar.  Could you be charged with neglect (educational neglect?)?  that would be my fear.</p>
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<p>I am in PA and the rules seem very minor to me, even though we are one of the toughest states.  It's very doable, imo.  it must be hard to come from a state that requires much less, I feel for you, but it's really a piece of cake.</p>
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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>EviesMom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1283433/is-it-common-to-homeschool-underground-in-pa#post_16095667"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>From what I've heard, it sounds worse on paper than it is in reality. (That's how I find it in NY; officially there are lots of "regulations" but they're pretty easy in practice in my experience.) </p>
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<p>I would have to agree.  It seems pretty intimidating on paper & I felt that intimidation until I met hs friends & talked with them about it.  It may be a bit of paperwork, which takes time, but in reality, it wasn't bad for my friends.  There are lots of options for the standardized tests.  Ask Pauline is an excellent resource:  <a href="http://home.comcast.net/~askpauline/index.html" target="_blank">http://home.comcast.net/~askpauline/index.html</a>I would not suggest going under the radar & don't know anyone here who does.  Welcome to PA! </p>
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<p>FYI-I haven't had to register myself yet since dd isn't old enough, hence I have to speak from others' experiences. ;)<br>
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<p>The worst case scenario does have pretty bad consequences, the way the law is written.  Fines and jail terms for truancy, 6 months community service for the school district.  $300 per truancy violation (3 unexcused absences), 5 days in jail.  If the child is over 13, the child can be fined that $300 instead of the parents, if the parents show that they tried to make him/her go to school.  Their driver's license can be suspended if they have one.  <a href="http://www.elc-pa.org/pubs/downloads%202009/What%20Are%20the%20Rules%20for%20School%20Attendance%202-6-09.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.elc-pa.org/pubs/downloads%202009/What%20Are%20the%20Rules%20for%20School%20Attendance%202-6-09.pdf</a></p>
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<p>My school district is one of the easiest ones in the state.  Complying has been very simple for me.  I haven't heard from them in over a year (so maybe they just lost my paperwork, lol).  Going under the radar isn't worth the risk to me.  I had heard of one person doing it but don't know if she still is.  I'm under the impression a few people don't report their first year (age 8) but then start.  Since the point of homeschooling for me is ds's best interest, and that doesn't include his suddenly being tossed into the local school because we've been accused or truancy or my serving a jail term, it was an easy decision for me.</p>
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<p>And we are radical unschoolers.  We do what we please from day to day.  Ds did need to take a standardized test, last year.  I chose one that was multiple choice that he could take at home.  He could take as long of a break as he wanted between sections (even days) and some of the sections were quite short.  He wasn't thrilled but he did it over several days and won't need to do another for 2 years.  So I just had to send in our affidavit, a statement saying I was homeschooling and ds had seen a doctor as required by law at the beginning of the year.  Then we lived our lives until spring when he took the test (and did fine).  I found an evaluator who is also an unschooler.  I sent her 4 portfolio pages.  They included a labeled picture of ds and a science experiment, two writing samples (he plays a computer game where he writes scenarios) that were several months apart and showed progress in the complexity of his use of language, and a page of math (this one was contrived.  I wrote up word problems, the sorts of things we talked about in daily life like how many weeks would it take to save his allowance for such and such item).  He was "interviewed" by the evaluator which can be done several different ways; by phone, in writing answering a couple simple questions, or chatting in person.  Ours asked very open ended questions like "tell me about your favorite book or a trip you took."  My school district is one of the ones which thinks the portfolio only needs to be seen by the evaluator so all I sent them at the end of the year was the test results and the letter from the evaluator.  Oh, I forgot about the booklist and attendance...  That was just a list of all the books we read or consulted and a chart full of checks marking that an appropriate number of school days were "attended" which I also sent the SD.</p>
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<p>So, I think a couple hours of my time and $50 a year is worth avoiding the risk of not complying with the law.  The money was to buy the test and a fee for the evaluator.  You can have your dc take the test for free with the school district but they do a test that is very heavy on the writing and my ds would have been uncomfortable in the strange surroundings.</p>
 
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