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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking of going vegan but I'm just not sure if it's nutritionally a good decision for me. I was vegetarian for many years and through most of college but looking back on it, I did not eat very well. (Lots and lots of cheese and soy! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> ) I have multiple food allergies including peanuts/tree nuts (which also means no legumes~beans), milk, eggs, soy, seafood and other random foods like oats, green beans, and cantalope. I would like to rotate grains and limit my gluten intake.<br>
Other than fruits and veggies, what the heck is left to eat?!? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">: What would my protein source be?<br>
Just to mix it up some more, I'm nursing an 18 month old too. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/innocent.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shy"><br>
I'd love your thoughts on this, TIA!
 

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are you sure about ALL legumes? there are wide varieties in their composition (for instance peas and lentils are often tolerated where beans are not)<br><br>
have you tried more rare grains like Teff (which while gluten-free is very high in protein)?<br><br>
as for what your protein source would be, there is protein in everything, even lettuce. More in some, less in others, but some research (The China Study by T.Colin Campbell) indicates LOW protein intake is actually very beneficial and even outright preventative in regards to cancer.<br><br>
Can you eat seeds (flax, sesame, sunflower)? Can you eat nutritional yeast? Avocadoes & bananas? all those have decent protein. Potatoes have 4 g protein per medium potato, not half bad.<br><br>
You could be veg, but it would take careful planning on your part to make sure you aren't eating imbalanced.<br><br>
some non-gluten grains off the top of my head:<br><br>
teff<br>
amaranth<br>
quinoa<br>
corn<br>
rice (brown/white/wild-high in protein)<br>
millet (very nutritionally packed too)<br><br>
are you sure you can't have ANY tree nuts? or only those in say the almond family or the cashew family etc?
 

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Hmmm yep, it sounds like you'd have to do a lot of careful research. Beans and legumes is a tough one. I have a few allergies, I can't have avocado, fruits (yep, pretty much all of them), soy (at all, except in teeny amounts like soy sauce) and I can have beans but I have to limit them quite a bit. Lentils I seem to be fine with and split pea's are okay as well. I eat loads of variety to make sure I get everything I need and I'm working closely with my GP who's keeping an eye on my nutrition and stuff. I'd say it's doable but you'll just have to be careful. (seitan is also a protein source, not gluten free however).
 

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You may want to look into the raw food diet...not that you have to be 100%, but I found it because I was vegan and couldn't do soy, most legumes, some nuts or gluten. Just search for raw recipes. It's totally doable, and doesn't require that much "effort"<br><br>
I am nursing 2, and was raw through my last pregnancy. IT hasn't been an issue. There is a thread around if you are interested...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, I really need to avoid the <b>entire</b> legume family and ALL tree nuts. Peanuts and tree nuts are my most severe life-threatening allergiesThat is why I ruled out a raw diet because from what I've read, a lot is nut based. If it's not then I'd be very interested in exploring that route. Got any good recipes?<br><br>
Peanuts and legumes fall in the same family, to help lower allergen exposure it is recommended to avoid that entire family of foods.<br>
The legume family consists of:<br>
alfalfa (sprouts)<br>
beans-<br>
adzuki, anasazi, black turtle, fava, lima, mung (sprouts), navy, northern, pinto, string (kidney),<br>
black eyed pea (cowpea)<br>
carob<br>
carob syrup<br>
chickpea(garbanzo)<br>
cloves<br>
fenugreek<br>
guar gum<br>
gum acacia<br>
gum tragacanth<br>
jicama<br>
kudzu (kuzu)<br>
lentil<br>
licorice<br>
pea<br>
peanut<br>
peanut oil<br>
red clover<br>
senna<br>
soybean<br>
lecithin<br>
soy flour<br>
soy grits<br>
soy milk<br>
soy oil<br>
tempeh<br>
tofu<br>
tamarind<br>
tonka bean<br>
coumarin<br><br>
As far as nutritional yeast is concerned, I'm trying to avoid it until the rest of my allergies are under control. I have a hard time with seeds, most don't agree with my stomach and give me the same "allergic feeling" like sesame seeds (I avoid tahini). I've just started experimenting with flax. The food guide I am following is <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Allergy and Candida Cooking Made Easy</span> by Sondra Lewis. She advocates a 4 day rotational diet and provides some great information but isn't vegetarian. Got any other cookbook recommendations?<br>
Thanks for the thoughts, keep them coming!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>NatureMama3</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7923568"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">as for what your protein source would be, there is protein in everything, even lettuce. More in some, less in others, but some research (The China Study by T.Colin Campbell) indicates LOW protein intake is actually very beneficial and even outright preventative in regards to cancer.</div>
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In the China Study, Campbell said you could eat as much plant protein with no negative consequence- over 10% animal protein in the diet was the culprit in health woes. Just want to clarify because he was not advicing a low protien diet, if your diet was plant based.<br><br>
To the op, do what works for your body; your allergies are extensive. At least chocolate was not on your list (although processing probably knocks it out). What are your reasons for going vegan?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
As far as reasons for going vegan, I was mulling over going back to being veg when I realized because of my food allergies I would be a kind of an "accidental" vegan. I know I need to get a handle on my allergies as well as returning to a better healthier diet. (I also have tons of environmental allergies) So I guess I'm equating going veg with eating better. (yes, I know the two are not mutually inclusive) I just am not sure if it is possible for me to be vegan with the amount of allergies I have. So curiosity has me asking this lovely forum of like-minded individuals for some thoughts on my dilemma. And yes, I'm totally grateful chocolate is not on my list of allergies!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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Have you met my husband? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
What you may have is not actually food allergies but food chemical allergies. Dh is the same way and it makes eating difficult period. I posted a thread here in the veggie forum a bit ago asking the same thing. Throw in blood sugar issues and my DH is a freak among food. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I was given <a href="http://www.plantpoisonsandrottenstuff.com/" target="_blank">this link to check out.</a> There is a symptom list on there that you should check out. I suggest looking through there and reading about the diet and why it's "safe". We don't follow it to the t but it's insane how much a difference it does make when we do. It is a very strict diet if you do follow it to the t but you can always use it as a guideline...for isntance the veggies. We use that as a basic list when we go grocery shopping. Drinks...same thing. We haven't branched into medicine since we don't use OTC and our toiletries don't bother DH.<br><br>
It is possible to be veg*n and have food issues! We've been doing it since March 31st and so far we have only had a few food reactions and we know that it was tied to soy (DH can have veggie burgers but he CAN'T have the original Boca Burger due to the amount of soy in it. Flame grilled is fine.) A lot of it at this point is trial and error. Last night for instance I made a dinner I have done before but tried different noodles since our whole wheat noodles get a reaction in DH. The only thing I changed was the noodles. I used a no name "wacky mac" veggie noodle mix. It had tomato, beet, carrot, and spinach noodles. DH had two servings and felt great. If you find yourself reacting to something don't toss the whole thing out the window...change "trigger" foods until it is an ok meal for you. I know it can be uncomfortable (I don't know how you react to the foods you can't eat) but if you do small portions you can minimize the reaction but still get one to see if it's a safe food. You list a lot of allergies that DH has as well so if you want feel free to pm me and I can send you a list of what we have found to be safe foods so far. That way you can get a little somethin' somethin' under your belt. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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As far as protein goes, I don't know how great it will be for me long term but I eat a very high carb diet and have done for years due to my health issues. I eat enough protein, just mostly high carb and you may find that you have to do the same (I know you said you didn't want to but sometimes you just have to eat what your body will accept). I find that as long as I rotate my grains and flours etc around a lot I feel okay eating this way. I eat LOT's of carby veggies like potato, sweet potato, pumpkin etc etc and less of the other sorts (although I do eat them).
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>OtherMother'n'Madre</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7928244"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Have you met my husband? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
What you may have is not actually food allergies but food chemical allergies. Dh is the same way and it makes eating difficult period. I posted a thread here in the veggie forum a bit ago asking the same thing. Throw in blood sugar issues and my DH is a freak among food. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I was given <a href="http://www.plantpoisonsandrottenstuff.com/" target="_blank">this link to check out.</a> There is a symptom list on there that you should check out. I suggest looking through there and reading about the diet and why it's "safe". We don't follow it to the t but it's insane how much a difference it does make when we do. It is a very strict diet if you do follow it to the t but you can always use it as a guideline...for isntance the veggies. We use that as a basic list when we go grocery shopping. Drinks...same thing. We haven't branched into medicine since we don't use OTC and our toiletries don't bother DH.<br><br>
It is possible to be veg*n and have food issues! We've been doing it since March 31st and so far we have only had a few food reactions and we know that it was tied to soy (DH can have veggie burgers but he CAN'T have the original Boca Burger due to the amount of soy in it. Flame grilled is fine.) A lot of it at this point is trial and error. Last night for instance I made a dinner I have done before but tried different noodles since our whole wheat noodles get a reaction in DH. The only thing I changed was the noodles. I used a no name "wacky mac" veggie noodle mix. It had tomato, beet, carrot, and spinach noodles. DH had two servings and felt great. If you find yourself reacting to something don't toss the whole thing out the window...change "trigger" foods until it is an ok meal for you. I know it can be uncomfortable (I don't know how you react to the foods you can't eat) but if you do small portions you can minimize the reaction but still get one to see if it's a safe food. You list a lot of allergies that DH has as well so if you want feel free to pm me and I can send you a list of what we have found to be safe foods so far. That way you can get a little somethin' somethin' under your belt. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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Ahhh I've been reading about your husbands food allergies etc for ages now but it didn't click he was on the failsafe diet. I was on it for about 4 months (hoping it would help but I wasn't a lucky one).<br><br>
As far as the failsafe diet goes I imagine it would be kind of a tough one being veg given that (this is the elimination part) the only veggies you can eat are swedes, potatoes (white) and brussels sprouts (and not a whole lot else!!). I don't know how you guys managed it! I have Sue Dengates Cookbook here and the RPAH one, they were lifesavers when I was on it (sorry this is totally off topic but it just clicked for me).
 

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Its certainly possible to do. DD2 has multiple sensitivities and we are vegan. Admitedly we don't have pulse issues.<br><br>
As for raw - well there are plenty of raw folk who eat no or hardly any nuts. Seeds do feature though (hemp and quinoa, some oats) and lots and lots of greens :) WRT pulses - a lot of people do find that they cannot eat them cooked, but that they are fine with sprouted pulses in the 'raw' way. There are a couple of things on your list that I'm intrigued to see there - jicama is not considered a pulse or a tree nut here in the UK, neither does red clover fall into these categories. Alfalfa is a seed, not a treenut, that is eaten sprouted here. Lecithin can be derived from many sources, and whilst legumes (usually soya for commercial reasons) are one of those, most used here (UK) comes from sunflower seeds, or from oil seed rape. I'm also a little suprised to see liquorice on your list - sticks and root is the main source for this, its not considered a legume/pulse, or a treenut or nut.. Think my head is <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:<br><br><br>
Thing about raw food is that so much of what is written about is the recreational stuff, the 'gourmet', the resturant meal. Day to day people eat far far more simply, process far less and don't bother with using a dehydrator at all <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"> Lots of smoothies etc.<br><br><br>
OK - we eat a varied vegan diet, and very little of our intake is of things on your list (excepting the things I've queried above), my dd2 has malic acid as an issue as well which is, um, interesting. I'm going to think more on this as I suspect that we are actually eating very similarly so will come back with thoughts...
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>wildtigercubs</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7932289"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Ahhh I've been reading about your husbands food allergies etc for ages now but it didn't click he was on the failsafe diet. I was on it for about 4 months (hoping it would help but I wasn't a lucky one).<br><br>
As far as the failsafe diet goes I imagine it would be kind of a tough one being veg given that (this is the elimination part) the only veggies you can eat are swedes, potatoes (white) and brussels sprouts (and not a whole lot else!!). I don't know how you guys managed it! I have Sue Dengates Cookbook here and the RPAH one, they were lifesavers when I was on it (sorry this is totally off topic but it just clicked for me).</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Like I said, it's tough and we don't actually follow the diet but use it more as a guideline. The two main things we noticed in regards to trigger foods is how they are cooked and if they are organic. DH has a hard time with pastas due to his blood sugar issues. It's been an uphill battle finding one we can use. For some reason, he doesn't react to organic brands of simple pastas. When I say simple, they need to be ONE grain or veggie based (like a spinach noodle). He can't handle a multigrain style noodle as well as a simple egg noodle for instance. I think, in terms of pasta at least, the fact that there are so many less preservatives and crap for his body to break down in an organic one that he can digest and break down the trigger easier. It doesn't have a chance to sit and ferment in his blood stream/gut.<br><br>
The other thing is how the veggies are cooked. The thing to remember is cooking activates certain properties of foods that can be less than desireable to our bodies. The failsafe diet explains it pretty well. For instance meat (since none of us here eat it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">), the older it gets the more amines it naturally produces (a compound of amonia). ok that's fine since it's naturally occuring but add in cooking and those compounds shoot through the roof. Especially if you cook it to health standards and chose at least a medium rare. That's when they become a problem for the body. It's an overdose and since the body can't handle that plus other things you get trace amounts floating around causing issues. The veggies we thought we triggers were actually being cooked wrong. We either eat them raw or we stir fry them. We don't add in extra juices/liquids. We don't boil anymore. Everything gets stir fried and then added to whatever...even the veggies that go into salads or casseroles. He has had fewer reactions to foods done in that manner than we thought possible.<br><br>
Soy is a toss up in our house. DH really can't handle it but we have found that there are times he can. We still have yet to find out what changes it up for him but one thing we do know is how it's cooked (again!) and the firmness of it. He can't have soft but he can have extra firm. Oddly enough when it comes to dairy the harder it is the easier his body handles it. Conincidence? Possibly. Who knows? Soy is eliminated for the most part in our diet right now. We have no problem doing veggie burgers and tofu but as of right now they cause reactions in him. Switching from an omni diet to veggie there is going to be a detox. We are hoping that here in a few months when the body is on track with the diet we can start introducing more and more trigger foods. So far we have found a pasta that works. That's it. Every thing else is still in que. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Helen_A, My legume family list came from a book I mentioned, Allergy and Candida Cooking Made Easy by Sondra Lewis. I was not listing the tree nuts in there as they have separate families. (i.e. black walnuts) I'm very interested in hearing what you do for your DD2 and would love to hear your pantry list or recipes that have worked for you. Especially the raw stuff!<br><br>
OtherMother'n'Madre, Thanks for the link. I haven't gotten through it all but I am interested in how you make it work for your husband and family.<br><br>
Wildtigrecubs, Could you tell me the names of the books you mentioned? (Sue Dengates Cookbook here and the RPAH one)<br><br>
Thanks everyone! I love all the input, keep it coming!
 

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I would probably do a lot of sprouting too, since the protein content is higher in those and you can sprout anything for the most part (we LOVE broccoli sprouts for instance, and clover).
 

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I have a cookbook that I have not used in years, but perhaps it would help... The Allergy Self-help Cookbook by Marjorie Hurt Jones. It does not have a section on vegans, but it does adress vegetarians and omnis.<br><br>
With my food allergies, I can have small amounts of some of the foods and others are problematic, if I have any. I personally think your list of foods to avoid is prohibitive for being satisfied as a vegan if you can not have any nuts or legumes, but maybe not because I do not know what you eat regularly anyway.<br><br>
Some more possiblities for protein... quinoa and brown rice.<br><br>
Are you working with an allergist or are you self diagnosing based on a book?
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>greengmax</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7939990"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Helen_A, My legume family list came from a book I mentioned, Allergy and Candida Cooking Made Easy by Sondra Lewis. I was not listing the tree nuts in there as they have separate families. (i.e. black walnuts) I'm very interested in hearing what you do for your DD2 and would love to hear your pantry list or recipes that have worked for you. Especially the raw stuff!<br><br>
OtherMother'n'Madre, Thanks for the link. I haven't gotten through it all but I am interested in how you make it work for your husband and family.<br><br>
Wildtigrecubs, Could you tell me the names of the books you mentioned? (Sue Dengates Cookbook here and the RPAH one)<br><br>
Thanks everyone! I love all the input, keep it coming!</div>
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Sue Dengates Website is here: <a href="http://www.fedupwithfoodadditives.info/" target="_blank">http://www.fedupwithfoodadditives.info/</a> I don't know where in the US you can get her book (maybe try amazon?) but I know that it's available over there. She has lot's of info on her site, it sucks a bit to navigate though.<br><br>
The Royal Prince Alfred Hospital one is here: <a href="http://www.cs.nsw.gov.au/rpa/allergy/resources/foodintol/friendlyfood.cfm" target="_blank">http://www.cs.nsw.gov.au/rpa/allergy...iendlyfood.cfm</a> Called Friendly Food.<br><br>
Sue based her cookbooks around this one's recommendations for an elimination diet. Hers has far more recipe's but none that are in the RPAH one.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>OtherMother'n'Madre</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7938535"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Like I said, it's tough and we don't actually follow the diet but use it more as a guideline. The two main things we noticed in regards to trigger foods is how they are cooked and if they are organic. DH has a hard time with pastas due to his blood sugar issues. It's been an uphill battle finding one we can use. For some reason, he doesn't react to organic brands of simple pastas. When I say simple, they need to be ONE grain or veggie based (like a spinach noodle). He can't handle a multigrain style noodle as well as a simple egg noodle for instance. I think, in terms of pasta at least, the fact that there are so many less preservatives and crap for his body to break down in an organic one that he can digest and break down the trigger easier. It doesn't have a chance to sit and ferment in his blood stream/gut.<br><br>
The other thing is how the veggies are cooked. The thing to remember is cooking activates certain properties of foods that can be less than desireable to our bodies. The failsafe diet explains it pretty well. For instance meat (since none of us here eat it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">), the older it gets the more amines it naturally produces (a compound of amonia). ok that's fine since it's naturally occuring but add in cooking and those compounds shoot through the roof. Especially if you cook it to health standards and chose at least a medium rare. That's when they become a problem for the body. It's an overdose and since the body can't handle that plus other things you get trace amounts floating around causing issues. The veggies we thought we triggers were actually being cooked wrong. We either eat them raw or we stir fry them. We don't add in extra juices/liquids. We don't boil anymore. Everything gets stir fried and then added to whatever...even the veggies that go into salads or casseroles. He has had fewer reactions to foods done in that manner than we thought possible.<br><br>
Soy is a toss up in our house. DH really can't handle it but we have found that there are times he can. We still have yet to find out what changes it up for him but one thing we do know is how it's cooked (again!) and the firmness of it. He can't have soft but he can have extra firm. Oddly enough when it comes to dairy the harder it is the easier his body handles it. Conincidence? Possibly. Who knows? Soy is eliminated for the most part in our diet right now. We have no problem doing veggie burgers and tofu but as of right now they cause reactions in him. Switching from an omni diet to veggie there is going to be a detox. We are hoping that here in a few months when the body is on track with the diet we can start introducing more and more trigger foods. So far we have found a pasta that works. That's it. Every thing else is still in que. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"></div>
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Wow! I found it hard when I did it and I was omni!! I suspect I have an amine intolerance but given that I have IBS the diet didn't make enough of a difference to it for me to bother (or for me to be able to pinpoint really). I have too many symptoms that aren't food related! I do know though that banana's and avocados give me an itchy mouth and throat and a big belly ache after I eat them and when I was omni I loved tuna sandwiches but also ended up with a big belly ache for hours afterwards. Chocolate burns my throat instantly (no matter what kind but I can handle a little bit of cocoa powder) and then causes washing machine belly. Soy I only picked up on cause I went dairy free for a few months a couple of years back (separate to the diet) and drinking soy milk had me on the loo the next day without fail. Every time I stopped drinking it the toilet visits would slow down and then when I had it again back to the toilet. It only took about 1/2 a cup a day too. I can handle a teeny bit of tofu (like a couple of squares, nothing worth bothering to cook and it gets me all washing machine belly again) and a teeny bit of tempeh (that one seemed to go down okay but I only had a tiny amount) and soy sauce and stuff doesn't bother me. I could never drink it though or eat an entire meal cooked with tofu and I only experiment with it about once a month if that <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Too bad cause I love soy!!<br><br>
Hmmm wondering if your hubby can handle firm dairy but not wet is it possible to just be a lactose intolerance with that one? I know that as cheeses etc harden they have less lactose than something like ricotta? Although yoghurt is different again I guess.<br><br>
Good luck with the diet and figuring out what his triggers are! I hope you have better luck than I did <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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