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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a crooked spine (Shaped in a complete S).<br><br>
The chiropractors and midwives all agree: The reason for my herendous sloughtering back labor was due to my moderate scoliosis, not wrong positions from baby and I as most of you might think.<br><br>
I gave birth in January this year and I still remember the back-stabbing contractions. Made it to 9 cm and asked for the epi at the LAST MINUTE, literally (and got one <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: I know I'm a whimp.)<br><br>
Is there hope for me or am I just kidding myself that I can stilll have a peaceful, good natural labor with # 2 with back labor?<br><br>
-Caitrin
 

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DD was posterior, came out face up so yeah, some awful back labor, and we had an amazing wonderful hospital waterbirth with her. It was truely amazing. I took hypnobirthing with her, now I didn't hypnobirth "correctly" but it allowed me to relax enough to enjoy (most of) the experience, I was able to stay on top of all but one contraction between the class and the amazing support I had it was really wonderful.<br><br>
So yes you can. Also second babies are so different from 1st.
 

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I had back labor with my first and am not convinced it was due to position. I think it may just be how my body feels birth (had all after pains in my back as well). Anyway, I had a natural birth with her although I can't say it was peaceful. It wasn't horrible by anymeans but it was difficult. Also, at 9 cent you are in transition and it is very common for women, back labor or not, to request medication at that point in time. It is kind of sad that they gave it to you at that point though! I am doing hypnobabies for this birth to add the peaceful dimension to this birth. Certainly something you could look into.
 

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I had back labor with my first that wasn't due to posterior position. I did okay as long as someone was providing constant counterpressure during contractions (but boy did I loose it if they didn't get there fast enough or push hard enough). I always wondered if it had anything to do with my spinal alignment (my back dips in drastically at the waist)<br><br>
My 2nd labor was totally different, no back labor, no vomiting in transition.<br><br>
Christa
 

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I have scoliosis and I had (I think) back labor. I don't know what else you'd call it, but hey, not having any other labor to compare it to, I can't say for sure. I applied counterpressure myself during every contraction from transition on (which was a long time).<br><br>
For me, a "good" natural birth means intervention only when necessary and being respected during the process. Enjoying it or not being in horrendous agony is probably not part of the equation. Sure, I'd like to not be in agonizing pain for 8 hours next time, but I'm not placing any bets.<br><br>
So by how I think of a good natural birth, yes, you can have one with a very painful labor. It has more to do with being respected by my birth attendants than how I physically feel during the birth. I hated how NCB felt. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"> But I'll do it again, because I do think it's best for me and the baby. Not to mention the epidural would be more difficult to place properly d/t the spinal curvature (mine is worst near the bottom of my spine).
 

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I had nothing but back labor with DS, who was posterior and crooked. I also have mild scoliosis, which was probably a contributing factor. I remember thinking in transition "Gee, maybe doing this without the epidural wasn't such a good idea after all..." but stuck it out and had what I consider to be a really good natural birth. It hurt, but it was really good anyway. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Counterpressure really helped, and I don't know if I would have gotten through it without having the birth pool there to help get the weight off my back. Also, making sure that my back was supported during pushing really helped... we ended up wadding up a bunch of towels and sticking them in the bottom of the pool (I pushed in a supported semi-reclining squat) so that I wasn't adding extra stress to my back. That really helped.
 

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I had back labor with all 4 of mine. I can definitely say hot towels are great on your back with my last 3. I did not have excruciatingly painful labors though. I like to say that I had natural labor, though by some definitions it wasn't completely natural. (The first, I was knocked out on demerol (not natural, but not epidural) and the other 3 were all induced with pitocin, but no epidural.)<br><br>
For my 3rd child, the midwives at the hospital were great about heating up towels at the hospital (microwave or hospital warmer???). For my 4th child (different hospital and no midwives due to high risk status) they had some pads that are peel-and-stick. They crackled something in it and it stays hot on your back for hours once opened and placed. If you labor at home, self-heating back pads are available in stores in generic and name brand now. The hospital ones were much bigger though.<br><br>
Heat on my back was my friend!<br><br>
(I don't know if it is allowed, but I wonder if a local anaesthetic would work on your back?! I ask because I ALMOST got an epidural with my 3rd child. After my bp went up and I was no longer allowed to labor my way, I had problems with labor shooting down my thigh muscle. How are you supposed to breathe through THAT?! Anyway, I was stalling at 8cm at midnight, so they suggested I try an epidural since I was tired and fighting it. I reluctantly submitted. They had already numbed my back for the epidural. The anasthesiologist was standing there with the needle right at my back ready to start when I hollered that the babies head hit the bed (more proof that I should have been allowed to labor my way bp or not?!). That doctor backed up and didn't touch me. I was right and a couple pushes later, she was delivered on full bed. We ended up joking about the numbing of my back and the back labor as an option. I'm totally not sure if that is allowed as a choice option though. The worst they could do is say no. I would ask if it is really bad and not due to baby, but your physical stature.<br><br>
Hope this helps. Yes, I think you can.<br><br>
Faith
 

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Yes it's possible. I had back labor with 4 of our 5. After the first, I just planned for backlabor and did my best to enjoy it and accept that was how labor felt for me. (not to say I wasn't planning and doing my OFP excecizes and positions!)<br><br>
IMO the hard part is when it's unexpected. My one labor that <i>wasn't</i> back labor threw me for a loop and took a while to process.<br><br>
Anyhow dh and I were able to laugh, eat, and even sleep (and drool) between contractions. Doesn't mean it was easy, just that I knew how to handle and even welcome it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everyone for your advice, but something that no one has yet mentioned so I'll do it:<br><br>
What about salene (sp?) water injections?<br><br>
Is that still considered natural since it's just sugar water?<br><br>
Does it help?<br><br>
If so, how long and are they available at birth centers?<br><br>
-Caitrin
 

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I think that would be salt water, not sugar water. But I don't know anything about it.<br><br>
Both my labors were back labor. DS2 was born posterior. I have mild scoliosis. I don't know if it was a contributing factor. Counterpressure helped more with DS1 than w/DS2, actually.<br><br>
Both were good, natural births (no nothin' except some homeopathics in labor w/DS2). Both hurt A LOT. DS2 hurt more than DS1, but it was also a LOT faster - 6.5 hours vs. 22, so I'm pretty sure that's why.
 

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I have moderate/severe scoliosis (treated with a back brace for 5 years). With dd I had back labor and with counter pressure and warm compresses it was bearable. With ds I didn't have any back labor.
 

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You can use sterile water injections for back labor. A tiny amount of sterile water (not saline, not sugar water - plain sterile water) is injected intradermally into the skin over the sacrum in 4 places. It stings like crazy for a minute or 2, but if the pain is mostly in the back, it usually induces about 45-90 minutes of relief of back pain. The thought is that the stinging of injecting the water overloads the cutaneous nerves and induces anesthesia that way. There is no medication involved, just water (usually 0.4 ml or less than 1/10th a teaspoon is injected in each of 4 spots.)<br>
Whether or not it would be available at a birth center would depend on whether your provider knows how to do it or would be willing to give it a try. There are no risks other than the stinging pain when it is injected and the risk that it won't work.<br>
The first time I did it I actually searched online for directions and found them on a midwifery site and read them through, then injected. The mama was out of her mind with pain at 9.5 cms dilation and epidural was not available because our anesthesiologist was at an emergency. I was scared to death it wouldn't work, especially after the mom screamed when I injected and I thought if it didn't work and I put her through that pain she'd never forgive me - but it worked like a charm and she had complete relief of the back labor within 2 minutes and was pushing her baby out shortly thereafter. I've since used it a few times and it works great as long as the pain is mostly confined to the back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>doctorjen</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9868208"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You can use sterile water injections for back labor. A tiny amount of sterile water (not saline, not sugar water - plain sterile water) is injected intradermally into the skin over the sacrum in 4 places. It stings like crazy for a minute or 2, but if the pain is mostly in the back, it usually induces about 45-90 minutes of relief of back pain. The thought is that the stinging of injecting the water overloads the cutaneous nerves and induces anesthesia that way. There is no medication involved, just water (usually 0.4 ml or less than 1/10th a teaspoon is injected in each of 4 spots.)<br>
Whether or not it would be available at a birth center would depend on whether your provider knows how to do it or would be willing to give it a try. There are no risks other than the stinging pain when it is injected and the risk that it won't work.<br>
The first time I did it I actually searched online for directions and found them on a midwifery site and read them through, then injected. The mama was out of her mind with pain at 9.5 cms dilation and epidural was not available because our anesthesiologist was at an emergency. I was scared to death it wouldn't work, especially after the mom screamed when I injected and I thought if it didn't work and I put her through that pain she'd never forgive me - but it worked like a charm and she had complete relief of the back labor within 2 minutes and was pushing her baby out shortly thereafter. I've since used it a few times and it works great as long as the pain is mostly confined to the back.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
WOW. Thanks, you've given me a lot of hope <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I think I will definitely request this sterile water injection. The back labor was so herendous...<br><br>
I'M WONDERING THOUGH...Since I was pitocin-induced, was the back labor STRONGER than if I had had a natural labor?<br><br>
If I have a pitocin-free labor next time, maybe it won't be as bad in my back?<br><br>
THOUGHTS?<br><br>
(My mother said all her labors were the same- pitocin and non-pitocin but that seems odd to me)<br><br>
-Caitrin
 

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Pit labors tend to me more intense, so you might do better without it.<br><br>
I had back labor all 4 times, but was lucky that counterpressure provided me a lot of relief, as did being upright (I could not have laid down at all during labor - luckily never an issue.) To this day, I can forgive my dh just about anything for his constant back pressure while I labored with our children!
 

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Counter pressure for every contraction! If my DH wasn't right there doing that I think I would have lost it. However, with the couterpressure it was very manageable both times for me.
 
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