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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My ds had some blood work done when he was 2 years old and his lead level was a 3. From my understanding, doctors don't get concerned unless it is over a 10.<br>
My ds has some developmental delays so I sent in a hair analysis to a lab to also check for metals, e.t.c.<br><br>
The lead amount should not exceed a 1 and his was 1.6- the chemist that I talked to said to get his lead level down as soon as I can. We are investigating but would you be alarmed if this was your child's lead level?<br><br>
We have checked the water and that is fine, he does not really play in dirt, and I only burn lead free candles. I guess the next step is to check our paint- our home was built in the 70's. I keep reading about people who bought these kits at Home Depot that check for lead in your home. We went there and they only sell kits to check lead in your water-not the walls. We have called 2 paint stores and they don't have test kits either. What am I supposed to do? Call the Health department to get someone over or try to find one of these kits?<br><br>
Please help!
 

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You can buy the lead check kits online - I bought a box of maybe 12 of the swabs for around $20 - that way you can pretty much test all the paint in the house. It's unlikely to have lead paint INSIDE the house if it's built in the 70s. Maybe on the outside, but even that is a little unusual for a house built that late.<br><br>
I don;t know anything about hair analysis, but 3 is really not very high for a blood level. Okay, zero would be nice but is pretty unlikely. I know a lot of kids with lead levels of 2 or 3, it's pretty normal in areas with older housing for sure. When we were kids the average lead level was something like 15.<br><br>
That's not to say you shouldn't try to lower your dc's lead level. I'm just trying to give you a bit of perspective. Making sure he has a good iron and calcium intake helps reduce the body's absorption of lead.
 

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You got me curious, so I've been looking around on the web at info on hair analysis. It sounds like there is a lot of variability in testing methods, results and in the levels which are considered 'acceptable', so maybe you could find out if 1.6 (whatevers - micrograms per something?) is considered high by other labs.<br><br>
My understanding is also that since you have a blood level for lead (unlike some of the other things you probably tested for), that's the more important number and the one that would reflect any potential impact on brain development etc. - the level in the hair is the stuff his body has actually managed to excrete. Or am I misunderstanding this? I remember reading an article about autism where mercury toxicity was suspected from vaccines, but levels in the hair were low - basically the theory being that the children were unable to excrete it the way other people would, so it had caused more damage.
 

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I personally wouldn't freak if my child's blood lead level was a 3. But my DD right now is at a 10, no outward problems. We have a health department person coming over today or tomorrow to talk to us and possibly find out where she's getting exposed. We live in a really old house( like 100yr old) with chiping paint and god knows what kind of pipes. Like most people I would like her level to be 0. A health worker told me that most children have some just being in the enviroment. Basicly telling me 0 is impossible. I don't believe that. Lead paint wasn't "out lawed" till 1978. So if your house was built before then you might have some lead paint underneth it all.<br>
Hope you find out how your DS is getting exposed. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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If you do a search on this forum there are already lots of info about lead poisoning, how to heal, and how to combat the lead in your environment.<br>
Lead is also found in many toys, so it is not necessarily just the water and soil you need to be looking at. Lots of infant chew rings have lead and cadmium. Most soft plastics have high levels of lead, that is how they get the plastic to be malleable.<br><br>
If your child's lead was checked just using the finger prick, it is not accurate. You need to have a venous blood draw for accurate lead blood levels.<br><br>
ETA: did a quick search for you...<br><a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=265284&highlight=poisoning" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...ight=poisoning</a><br><a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=338751&highlight=poisoning" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...ight=poisoning</a><br><a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=16184&highlight=poisoning" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...ight=poisoning</a><br><a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=183851&highlight=poisoning" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...ight=poisoning</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the information. That was my understanding about the hair analysis too- that if a number was low, that could mean the child is not excreeting that metal- his mercury was VERY low but was high in aluminum, arsenic, and lead. I was not that concerned about the 1.6 reading until the chemist was freaking out telling me to get it down ASAP. We just ordered a lab kit online so we will see what that shows. I am going to send in my daughter's hair sample (who does not have developmental delays) and see what hers is.<br>
Off to do more research....
 
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