Mothering Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,796 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I spoke with a dear friend today,and she mentioned some drawings that her 3yo dd has been working on. She was asking to see if this is a girl thing-she has 2 older ds's.<br>
Anyway, her dd(just turned 3 in Sept.) is drawing elaborate pictures of people and animals. She will draw a whole person, with eyes,mouth,hair,arms,legs,everything! Yesterday, it was a PREGNANT mom belly included and everything! Then, a dog with legs,ears,and tail!<br><br>
Today while I was talking to my friend, her dd ran up and showed a drawing of GODZILLA, including claws and everything!!!!!<br><br>
I told my friend I thought her dd was showing a special gift.<br><br>
What do you think??<br><br>
mp
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
727 Posts
I would agree it sounds like she's talented. I would encourage her to keep her supplied in art supplies but not to push her. Maybe buy her a how to draw______ book to encourage her to do better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,039 Posts
There's a section on artistically gifted children in Ellen Winner's "Gifted Children," and this child certainly seems to fit the bill. IIRC, artistically gifted children are the least likely to have their talents recognized and receive the kind of training and help they need to fully develop their gifts. I'm not suggesting that a 3yo receive art lessons, but rather that the parents take the time to educate themselves now about how best to support their daughter in the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,473 Posts
My dd (about the same age) also does detailled drawings. I don't like to think of it as a special gift -- or an artistic gift -- but just as one way of drawing. I appreciate it and absolutely love to see what my dd draws, but I also appreciate when she paints a page of bright-colored brushstrokes that represent nothing. I'm also rather fond of the way she jumps from her stool onto the toilet seat and slides down on her knees. I'm endlessly thrilled by my dd and all her peculiar ways of doing things. :)<br><br>
Maybe I am oversensitive because I grew up as a "gifted child". The metathinking of the "special gift" concept can make its way over to the child in ways that really aren't particularly nurturing -- feelings of pressure and exclusion, and an interruption of the natural way that children work and learn. It's better for her if the focus remains on what she is doing, rather than the fact that she's doing it. And also on truly unconditional support, so that she is free to discover all the different parts of herself and simply be a child.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,839 Posts
This is an interesting thread because artistic children don't seem to be included in gifted labels usually. (As far as I know- my school didn't have gifted program or even honors classes, but I get the impression from gifted threads here that gifted has to do with reading, math, science).<br><br>
My dd also could draw entire people animals and scenes before she was three (she was drawing recognizably before she was two) and soon was mixing colors. I thought this was natural- but other people soon began commenting on it and after looking at what other kids are doing, I see she is different.<br><br>
I am sensitive about protecting her because I was the same way, but although I was recognized as having an unusual talent, I didn't have a positive experience with it in school. No one knew what to do with me. I think if there is an artistic gift, the best thing is to follow its lead and not direct it too early or squelch it but also to offer support and guidance when she gets to a point where she is hungering for more instruction.<br><br>
In the preschool years offering art supplies, time, space and letting her see others making art as a normal and natural part of life is the best thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Please, use caution with labelling a child as gifted <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent"><br><br>
I mean this in the kindest and most pleading way. I was born gifted (I was drawing in perspective at age 3) and ALL my life I was pressured to draw and draw and compete and compete...I burnt out very early (after my first 2 years at RISD I threw in the towel and went into preparations for a medical career) and I think that if I had been allowed to develop a love for artwork and not the assumption that this was ALL I was destined to do that I might have felt less pressured. I have since taught art professionally to 6-8 year-olds and I am always encouraging every student to explore feelings and the materials being used, to be not so much representational as simply--free. Please encourage her to draw for her own good, for her own happiness. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,796 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for your replies ladies!<br><br>
I understand what you're saying about labeling a child as gifted. This was just a conversation between my friend and I over the phone. I don't always think labeling achild is a bad thing. I too, was labeled "gifted", and I am glad I was, as I was put into classes that were more challenging to me. I did feel like an outcast at times, but I think that was because of the way my parents handled it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
Anyway, I was talking about my friend's dd....and for lack of a better word, I would describe it as a gift to draw that well at such a young age.<br><br>
My friend is well aware of labeling a child gifted....she has a *profoundly* gifted ds who in kinder was reading at a 6th grade level,now that he is in 5th grade, he is reading college-type books. Since kinder, the school has been wanting to *test* him. My friend has said no each year. She and her dh know how gifted he is, they don't need a test to show them.They want him to stay with his peers for his social needs. They choose to instead, supplement his studies at home. His two grandparents that live in the same town, are retired college profs.,so he is given *lots* of additional reading, fieldtrips, extra lessons,etc.<br><br>
Like someone mentioned, I think it is harder to identify a dc with an artistic gift. Seeing that your toddler is reading easily, is waay easier to identify.<br><br>
My friend is one of the most intelligent people I know, but I honestly think that what she is seeing in her dd's artwork was because she is a girl. That's when I said, uh....not a chance....this is a gift. She acted shocked-maybe her mind was thinking, oh no! here we go again!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
She is not going to make it an issue,rather she is going to give her dd lots of arts and crafts from now on. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"><br><br>
mp
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,839 Posts
It sounds like your friend will be wonderfully nurturing to her dd's gift!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,067 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mamapoppins</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">She is not going to make it an issue,rather she is going to give her dd lots of arts and crafts from now on. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"><br><br>
mp</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I'd encourage her to check out a book called Young At Art, I forget the author but she's the woman who made those Anti-Coloring Books. Please avoid "How To Draw" books for the time being. When the child is older and shows an interest in studying art, she could take a life drawing class or something, but most of those types of books aimed at young children really just teach them "this is how you draw a dog" and show some goofy cartoon dog. (My MIL, to this day, has one way of drawing a dog that obviously came from one of the books I'm thinking of. Every single one looks the same. It isn't art.)<br><br>
I don't want to be rude to the pp who suggested it, but it is one of my pet peeves. Giving children coloring books and how to draw books, I mean. Definately provide art supplies, but always make sure they are open ended. That means there is no expected result, like there would be with a "craft." Maybe even some adult supplies for every once in a while, because they work so much better.<br><br>
That definately sounds like a talented kid there. My friend's son was the same way, making beautiful, detailed, representational art at 3 years old, when my dd could barely sit still to scribble a big flourish on her paper before running off to do something else. (So it isn't a girl thing <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
I think being able to render accurately is a vital skill for an artist. However equally vital skills are <b>imagination</b> (that's the part that makes it "art") and <b>confidence</b> (needed to push boundaries and take risks). So in other words, i don't think that a child that shows early skills at drawing needs a different kind of attention than a child who doesn't. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent">
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top