Mothering Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,573 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to make something like these <a href="http://www.reusablebags.com/store/wrapnmat-p-2.html" target="_blank">http://www.reusablebags.com/store/wrapnmat-p-2.html</a><br><br>
out of oilclcoth. Can anyone tell me if that would be safe?<br><br>
thank you oh wise women....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,261 Posts
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/notes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="notes">:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,912 Posts
What about PUL, would that be safe?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,912 Posts
PUL is fabric laminated with polyurethane, it's used as a water proof fabric for diaper covers, AIOs and Hazmat suits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,896 Posts
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk">:<br><br>
but oil cloth is so much prettier
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,028 Posts
After reading the first link, you will see that it sounds like making your own oilcloth would be safe. But modern oilcloth is actually made from vinyl, & not reccomended, (it's a fossil fuel made product) So using linseed oil with canvas or linen (the old fashion way) would work great, & I couldn't find anything that said it is not food safe. But I would think that making a cloth bag coated with beeswax would also work I don't even know how you would do that. Rub it on?<br><br><a href="http://www.moscowfood.coop/archive/oilcloth.html" target="_blank">http://www.moscowfood.coop/archive/oilcloth.html</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
The Problem: Vinyl<br><br>
Polyvinyl chloride, commonly known as "PVC" or "vinyl," is one of the most common synthetic materials used to make plastic. The problem is that vinyl plastic, used extensively in building construction and packaging, creates global impacts from relentless toxic pollution that damages the health of all natural ecosystems.<br><br>
Ultimately, vinyl is the worst plastic for human health and the environment. Why? The reason is that the production of vinyl is the largest contributor to dioxins and persistent bioaccumulative toxics. The chemicals in vinyl plastic are known to cause cancer, disrupt the body’s hormone systems, and damage the nervous, immune and reproductive systems of all living things.<br><br>
Vinyl requires large quantities of chlorine and a multitude of other hazardous chemicals for production. Vinyl manufacturing has a long history of contaminating groundwater, polluting surrounding air sheds, and harming factory workers with highly toxic and carcinogenic vinyl chloride, PCB’s, dioxin, and other organo-chlorines.<br><br>
Dioxin, a by-product of combusting vinyl, damages reproductive capabilities in developing fetuses, damages the nerve system, and causes sexual hormone imbalances and cancer. It concentrates in mammalian breast milk and breast fed infants receive doses of dioxin orders of magnitude greater than those of the average adult.<br>
When its entire cycle of manufacture, use, and disposal are taken into account, vinyl creates more persistent toxic pollutants than any other known source. The toxic legacy of vinyl contaminates every inch of the planet and, even at low doses, contributes significantly to the disruption of ecosystems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,573 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thank you for the replies <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I guess I will try to make my own oilcloth...I wish I could just buy some old fashioned oilcloth, but I have searched theweb and had no luck. What is linseed, is it really safe?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,922 Posts
I'd guess you could do it by melting (over a double boiler) beeswax into some foodsafe oil and brushing it on with a stiff paint brush.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43,705 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>lilyka</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk">:<br><br>
but oil cloth is so much prettier</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
PUL can be pretty too- almost any fabric can be laminated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,912 Posts
The wrap n mats are lined with PEVA which is a food safe non-cholorine plastic. When I did a search on PEVA on ebay it came up with tons of clean shower curtains........I have 3 wrap n mats and they look easy to use, I'd like them to be bigger though because we use oddly shaped bread alot (I bake all of our bread). So the wheels in my head they are a turnin, lol.<br><br><br>
-Heather
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
524 Posts
These sites talk about food safe oils, but they are all in relation to finishing surfaces that may come into contact with foods (like tables). None talk about oilcloth in relation to food storage.<br><br>
I found this site that address linseed oil and food safety. It was opposed to linseed oil as a food safe oil:<br><a href="http://www.naturalhandyman.com/qa/qalinseedoil.shtm" target="_blank">http://www.naturalhandyman.com/qa/qalinseedoil.shtm</a><br><br>
This site recommends using tung, walnut or mineral oil as food safe:<br><a href="http://www.canadianhomeworkshop.com/diy/everything_finish.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.canadianhomeworkshop.com/...g_finish.shtml</a><br><br>
This place in the UK has a chesnut food safe oil.<br><a href="http://www.axminster.co.uk/product-Chestnut-Food-Safe-Oil-377292.htm" target="_blank">http://www.axminster.co.uk/product-C...Oil-377292.htm</a><br><br>
And this is tung nut oil which is FDA approved food safe:<br><a href="http://www.realmilkpaint.com/oil.html" target="_blank">http://www.realmilkpaint.com/oil.html</a><br><br>
This site is about oilcloth (but I do love the moscowfood article).<br><a href="http://www.codesmiths.com/shed/workshop/techniques/oilcloth/" target="_blank">http://www.codesmiths.com/shed/works...ques/oilcloth/</a><br><br>
This place has oilcloth and says oilcloth is made with linseed oil and does not recommend machine washing. But it doesn't say their oilcloth is made using linseed oil...<br><a href="http://www.wilshiregardenmarket.com/Outdoor_living/oilcloth_tablecloth.htm" target="_blank">http://www.wilshiregardenmarket.com/...tablecloth.htm</a><br><br>
More oilcloth from Mexico:<br><a href="http://www.mexicansugarskull.com/mexicansugarskull/OilclothSite/index.htm" target="_blank">http://www.mexicansugarskull.com/mex...Site/index.htm</a><br><br>
On the combustibility of cloth soaked in linseed oil:<br>
"I would like to mention again that linseed oil appears to very prone to<br>
spontaneous combustion under various circumstances. Even though most oils are flamable, the spontaneous combustion issue is very different. And<br>
although most oil soaked rags need to be disposed of carefully, linseed oil<br>
soaked rags are exceedingly prone to spontaneous combustion,i.e., rags<br>
soaked with linseed oil can rapidly build up enough heat to self ignite!<br>
Many reports and fire investigations have found rags soaked with linseed<br>
oil and linseed oil containing products to have been the source of fires that have caused great destruction and killed many people."<br><br>
So I was reading about sprouting and they recommend flax or hemp cloth for sprouting bags because they don't mold like cotton, and it made me think about these lunch bags. Do they have to be waterproof? The only things I put in lunches (in bags) are sandwiches, tortilla chips, and homemade baked goods. I'm not sure they need to be waterproof...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
524 Posts
Another question: I was thinking of ripstop nylon that you can buy in the fabric store, the kind that's really lightweight and has little box patterns. It is polyethylene. Is that a petroleum product? It's supposed to be food safe, I think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
hoping this isn't in the realm of OT, but my childrens' sandwiches (and adults too) have always been fine in a cloth napkin. then, they use the napkin as a "table setting" at lunch, and of course as its original purpose, a napkin <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br>
i did always think those velcro wrap things were cute though!
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top