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I have an almost-crawler (does alot of the rocking, alot of scooting) and I have her down on the ground as much as possible. The sooner she masters this, the happier we all will be because she's getting herself frustrated alot lately.

Ppl keep telling me it's good that she's a crawler because it means she will be a good reader. But no one can really explain it any more clearly than that it has something to do with brain development. Is there any truth to it? I tried a prelim. web search, no luck. anyone got any info, links, etc? Thanks!
 

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I know three non crawlers. One a 19 year old boy, one a 5 year old boy and my 3 year old. All of them skipped crawling altogether and started walking and/or cruising at around 7 months.
We've talked about this a lot (well not really anymore, but a lot when they decided not to crawl and just stood up and walked). The parents of the 19 year old said everyone said that to them too, but he has turned out to be an amazing reader, valedictorian of his high school class, great student etc. etc.
The five year old is reading well and very verbal.
Our 3 year old is well on his way to being quite the reader as well.

While I don't have links for you, I can offer this (from brain research classes). There is a correlation between the lower extremeties development and 'language' development. But I am unsure how the data works out because as I understand it is very uncommon to find a baby that did not crawl AT ALL, such as ours. There are just so many factors into what makes a child a reader, that to me it just feels like an old wives tale.
I think Joseph Chilton Pierce talked about it in his books (probably Magical Child, can't remember)

oh, by the way, our 3 year old is a very good crawler now. He spends a lot of time on the floor pretending to be a variety of animals, so maybe he will not have a problem after all.
 

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I have heard this, too. And whenever I hear of a child that doesn't crawl I ask if they've had trouble learning to read... so far three for three. Two of thhem are fine readers now. it just never came easily for them. the third is only 6 and is having great difficulty.. so we'll see.

I think the crawling/reading thing has to do with the development of the two distinct brain hemispheres and how they process information in distinct ways.. and how the "highways" that connect the two sides develope. I think that crawling helps use those highways, and integrates both sides of the brain, hence having access to both of those distinct functions...( I can't really remember off hand the specifics of this.. I'm obviously not using either side of my brian well this a.m.)

Anyway.. I think that the whole jist of the crawling/reading thing is in the learning to read.. once they actually learn theres not so much of a problem.. and i think that maybe the reason its hard to learn is maybe because of the way reading is taught...non crawlers maybe learn and process info in a different way than what is standardly taught in our schools... just my thought.
 

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I only have anecdotal evidence, but, my dd is the only child I know who never crawled (and she didn't walk until 14 months), and she is starting to read (of her own choice- no pushing or even encouraging from me) at 4 years old. She's defintely having a super easy time with it.
 

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Thats pretty cool, patty..

I wonder if shes learning to read in the same manner as whats taught in schools..I wonder if she didn't have some other way of using those motor skills to develope that link..I wonder if shes right or left brained?

Not that any of this really matters, what maters is that your child is obviosly not suffering any from not crawling


I just find this stuff fascinating and always want to know more.....
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by BAU3
I wonder if shes learning to read in the same manner as whats taught in schools..
I was a teacher and I can definitely say she is not learning to read the way kids do in 99% of schools- firstly that *she* is initiating the learning. Basically- she is learning to read, by learning to write. She incessantly wants to make cards for friends and family, so she sits there with her pencil and writes the words she knows, and asks how to write the words she doesn't know- so at this point most of her "reading" is sight words, not sounding out or anything. The thing is that she has a large group of sight words in her head, and is always learning more.

Also- she has many books that she "knows by heart", but she will follow along matching up the words she says to the words on the page, gaining more "sight words", she does though, want me to "teach her to read like Joey (her friend) does in school, ie- the "sound it out" stuff, so we will do some of that this summer for as long as she shows an interest. I am in no hurry for her to learn to read- but she sure is
.

Sorry- I know that was kind of OT, I do find this idea of crawling/reading interesting and would love to see links with more on that. My ds crawled, but doesn't have the interest (yet) that my dd does.
 

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Now that I think of it- how do they define "crawling"? My dd did move around the floor by scooting herself on her butt, and used her legs in that way
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I don't believe it. MY oldest DD was late crawling and late walking and late learning to jump, but at three is already learning to read and has always been very verbal. She said her first sentence at 11 months. I employ unschooling methods of teaching her, following her lead always.

My husband never crawled, according to MIL. He was late talking, too. But could read well before Kindergarten (just didn't have much to say, with three older sisters, I guess). He has an above-average grasp of language now as an adult.
 

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My aunt began cruising at 5-6 months--I've seen the photos and family movies, so I can verify this! She never crawled. When she got to kindergarten, her teacher forced her to learn how to crawl so that she would learn how to read. I don't know if that was before or after she tried to learn how to read, but obviously the teacher felt it was important to reading! All of my kids crawled and the 2 that are reading read early and have always been *way* ahead of their peers, but I really don't think that has anything to do with crawling.
 

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My older dd did not crawl. She scootched around on her bottom, and could move much faster than most crawlers. She had the added advantage of being able to use her hands to explore while she was in motion.

Somebody told me about the idea that crawling is some sort of vitally necessary developmental stage so I did some literature searching on the topic. It appears that this was a popular theory some time ago, but it has been discredited. Sorry, but I no longer have the info.

BTW, this child was reading at 4, and was in the highest level reading group in first grade.
 

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Its obvios just from the few of us here that theres holes in the crawling/reading theory. ...And also, if we went along with the notion of crawling/reading... wouldn't it stand to reason that children who did crawl would be good readers? and that is obviosly not the case just from looking around. (don't know this.. it just sems so.)

I have a book called The Dominance Factor that is all about braoin dominance (along with eye,hand,ear and foot) and how different combinationsmake up different"profiles" and tells what kind of learner you are. some are auditory, some visual.. some learn from the whole into parts.. some need the parts to make up the whole...some need time after a lesson to be by themselves and process what they've learned. Some need to manipulate with their hands while learning (knit, play with clay etc). Its pretty interesting.

oopps gotta run.. Georgies awake..
 

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It has long been therorized that crawling sets up the brains ability to track words on a page. However, I don't think there has ever been a conclusive study done...

Did you know there are 25 unique ways for an infant to crawl? Scooting on the bottom is even one!
 
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