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...a spiritual approach that is solitary rather than collective, unscheduled and inspired rather than organized for yourself and others?<br><br>
I just don't find myself in group spirituality. Just being present to ritual of any kind meant to symbolize spirituality seems to negate *actual* spiritual feelings. Kind of like, I feel least spiritual when someone makes a point of illustrating the presence of spirituality. If you have to make a point of it then what were we feeling anyway?<br><br>
Yet I am a very sociable person and I see the point of sharing socially one's spiritual observations. And in that case spontaneous offering is the only way I could imagine it feeling authentic. If I make an appointment for spiritual discussion at 6 o clock, I won't be feeling an authentic feeling.<br><br>
Does this make any sense? I feel like an extremely spiritual person--I feel I have a very rich inner life in that sense, and I have enjoyed wonderful *one on one* spiritual conversations with an individual who seemed to link up with me cosmically in that moment--an exciting kind of feeling, as though you just met someone who went to that one backstreet coffeehouse you loved in a town you only visited once on vacation--and *they* felt exactly the way you did about it--the thing that stood out to you and made it special is exactly what they say they felt too--it's just that wonderful moment of recognition of a value in a way that is authentic, unrehearsed, very tangible.<br><br>
But going to a meeting for people who went to that backwater coffeehouse and wanted to discuss it would be less magical, and in terms of spirituality--planning for it just makes it less spiritual.<br><br>
Is this making sense? Does anyone know a term for this kind of spirituality?
 

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Yes, you are making sense and I'm sure that there is a term for what you are describing. I'm no help with the exact word, however. Hopefully someone else will know.<br><br>
And I very much hear you on a set day and time to be "spiritual." That doesn't necessarily work for me, either. Part of the reason I like yoga and the accompanying meditation so much is that I can do it when I'm ready for it - anytime, anywhere - when the mood strikes me.
 

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I believe the word "sadhana" is similar to what you are describing, it means "spiritual path" but is very personal & individual. It is a term used in<br>
yoga & Buddhism. Here are some definitions that may explain better...<br><br><br>
This word refers to the entirety of a seeker's path -- all the practices, the postures, the language, the clothing, the diet, and so on which, taken together, comprise the way each of us has chosen. Thus, in the spiritual context, the expression "Walking the walk" means, following one's sadhana with honesty, devotion, determination, enthusiasm, and joy.<br><br><br>
Spiritual practice. Formula or system of formulas and methodology that when acted on create personal change spiritual evolution.<br><br><br>
Skt.; derived from sadh, "to arrive at the goal," and meaning roughly "means to completion or perfection." In Vajrayana Buddhism, a term for a particular type of liturgical text and the meditation practices presented in it. Sadhana texts describe in a detailed fashion deities to be experienced as spiritual realities and the entire process from graphic visualization of them to dissolving them into formless meditation. ...<br><a href="http://www.shambhala.com/html/catalog/items/isbn/0-87773-520-4.cfm" target="_blank">http://www.shambhala.com/html/catalo...7773-520-4.cfm</a><br><br><br>
"Effective, leading straight to the goal." The practice of spiritual disciplines such as meditation, japa, fasting, austerity, yoga and humble service. The goal of sadhana is to harness and transmute the instinctive/intellectual nature, allowing progressive unfoldment into the superconscious realizations and innate abilities of the soul.<br><a href="http://www.himalayanacademy.com/resources/books/virtue/SVGlossary.html" target="_blank">http://www.himalayanacademy.com/reso...VGlossary.html</a><br><br><br>
Someone's sadhana is a very individual & personal path, not necessarily deemed by dogma but is a process that naturally unfolds. At least that's the way I interpret sadhana in my own practice.
 
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