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Ever since I read it in high school I have always adored Edgar Allen Poe's poem Annabel Lee (here it is in case you aren't familiar <a href="http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/annabel-lee/" target="_blank">http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/annabel-lee/</a>)<br><br>
I even named my dd Annabel. I hand wrote out the whole poem on pretty paper, framed it and hung it on her wall.<br><br>
Recently a friend came over, read it and was shocked that I would put such a "morbid" poem on my dd's wall. She said it didn't seem appropriate to have a poem about a woman who died on a child's wall. But I think the poem is beyond beautiful. Maybe my vision is clouded though because I love it. What do you think?
 

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I love it and am sure your dd will when she is old enough to understand it!
 

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Yeah, it's morbid. But if you like it, what does it matter? It's not like your dd is old enough to read it.
 

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I think it is beautiful and really, reading it I get this strong sense of love surpassing everything, even death. I'd think you have that kind of love for YOUR annabel. Love knows no bounds. It seems appropriate to me in that sense.
 

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It's a dark poem, but I don't think everything has to be all rainbows and kitties and unicorns. I always loved Roald Dahl and fairy tales and all that type of stuff, and when I was four my favorite poem was "The Cremation of Sam McGee" by Robert Service - it's about a dead guy who talks, for heaven's sake!<br><br>
Annabel Lee is a beautiful poem and I love the name too.
 

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IMHO that poem is far more appropriate and healthy than a lot of the branded, thinly-veiled advertising that decorates many children's rooms.<br><br>
Besides, most little kids adore morbid. My DD is fascinated by everything about death and her best friend's favourite poem is "The Raven" by Poe. Another of her friends' career aspiration is to be - like, really be - Darth Vader. By the time your DD is old enough to understand the poem, she'll probably be right into all that stuff and she'll love it as much as you do - but probably more for the morbid bit than the love bit.
 

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Personally... I think it's wonderful. You loved that poem enough you named your DD Annabel, I think it's great to have that in her room so long as you don't mind if she takes it down when she gets older.<br><br>
Plus, it <i>is</i> a good poem.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Ammaarah</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15438367"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It's a dark poem, but I don't think everything has to be all rainbows and kitties and unicorns. I always loved Roald Dahl and fairy tales and all that type of stuff, and when I was four my favorite poem was "The Cremation of Sam McGee" by Robert Service - it's about a dead guy who talks, for heaven's sake!<br><br>
Annabel Lee is a beautiful poem and I love the name too.</div>
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Over here <i>everyone</i> in our house loves The Cremation of Sam McGee". DD had it memorized by the time she was 6. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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That is a truely beautiful poem, and I think its a fine thing to have in your dd's room <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Edgar Allen Poe was an amazing poet... so many of his poems are simply amazing!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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One of my top girls' names is Penelope after W.B. Yeat's <i>Brown Penny</i> and one of my top boys' names is River because of Langston Hughes' <i>The ***** Speaks of Rivers</i>. Also, I am seriously considering naming a girl Maude a lá <i>Little Sleep's-Head Sprouting Hair</i> in the Moonlight by Galway Kinnell despite knowing that she'd get the Bea Arthur theme song sung at her all the time when she was older.<br><br>
(Yes, I <i>am</i> a poetry nerd. I often describe it as one of my dearest friends. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">)<br><br>
I've loved Edgar Allen Poe since I was a child (I can still remember how important it was to me that I memorize <i>The Raven</i> as quickly as possible: "<i>Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary</i>" . . . ah, memories) and <i>Annabel Lee</i> is one of my favorites of his. I think it's beautiful poem <i>and</i> name, and what better way to help instill a love literature in your child than to give her such a wonderful gift.<br><br>
Your friend is just reacting to something she doesn't understand - we live in a world where kids believe a fat man in a red suit jumps down their chimneys once a year and gives them presents, one where people don't die - they just "go to sleep" and don't wake up. To me that's way scarier than a poem that is about ultimately accepting the inevitably of death and realizing that even death can't stop the love you have for someone. That your love and memory of them can keen them alive even after they are gone. For me it's actually quite a comforting thought.<br><br><br>
P.S. Starting when I was ten, I went to a public school known locally as Poe Elementary. Full name? You guessed it: Edgar Allan Poe Elementary School.<br><br>
That school remains a huge influence on me to this day, not just because of what I learned there or the friends I made: it helped to foster my interest in poetry and civil rights (it was one of the first desegregated schools in the city and some nut job tried to bomb it in protest - killing a couple of little girls in the process <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/censored.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="censored">).<br><br>
You ever want to talk poetry, I'm your girl. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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A band called Black Rebel Motorcycle Club has a song version of Annabel Lee on their album Beat the Devils Tattoo that I quite like.<br><br>
you can hear it here: <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ICjSar_KGM" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ICjSar_KGM</a>
 

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It's a lovely poem, but it is all kinds of twisted. Basically, the angels murder the little girl because they're jealous.<br><br>
I'm an English major. Like many of my kind, I am careful about symbolism. I would read this poem to my kid any day. Poe has these great strong rhythms, we could probably drum to it. I would not hang it up as a decoration in the nursery.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MeepyCat</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15438695"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm an English major. Like many of my kind, I am careful about symbolism.</div>
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I'm the daughter of an artist. Where I come from, art is the song of life in all its beauty and tragedy. Its song rang in all corners of my childhood home.
 

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P.S. I'd probably have a harder time reading the poem to my child than having it hung in her room, particularly if her name were Annabel. I didn't understand symbolism, or the meanings behind the art (including hung poems) around my home as a child -- nor would I had my mother spelled it out for me or produced a big conversation about each item -- but because it was part of my environment, I accepted it and eventually came to understand (and increasingly appreciate) little bits at a time. There's no more art in my <a href="http://ragtagsf.blogspot.com/2010/05/studio-pix.html" target="_blank">mom's studio</a> than in the rest of her house, and the art is nowhere less complex and varied.<br><br>
That said, my kids are 4 and 5, and I still haven't read them fairy tales, for slightly different reasons, but still...
 

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It is morbid and that isn't a death isn't a typical theme for a child's room. If it is something you are fine with and ready to talk through with your child when she asks about it then that is your business not your friends.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MeepyCat</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15438695"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It's a lovely poem, but it is all kinds of twisted. Basically, the angels murder the little girl because they're jealous.<br><br>
I'm an English major. Like many of my kind, I am careful about symbolism. I would read this poem to my kid any day. Poe has these great strong rhythms, we could probably drum to it. I would not hang it up as a decoration in the nursery.</div>
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I was an English major (I dual-majored actually, English and Economics) and I guess I missed the day when they went down the list and read the artist's explanation behind each of their works. Here I was thinking that it was up to each individual person to draw their own meaning from literature of any kind. To think I graduated. Oh, the horror! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
Poe fixated on loss because loss is what he knew. His father abandoned the family, his mother died a year later, his foster father ran hot-and-cold with him, he had to withdraw from college after less than a year because his foster father - despite having come into a large inheritance - did not give me enough money for the expenses, his fiancé married another man, poverty forced him into joining the Army, his foster father wouldn't answer his desperate letters when he tried to get out of the army - not even to tell him his foster mother was sick, when his foster father remarried bitter fights with his new wife led him to disown Poe, he purposely went about getting himself court-martialed from his commission at West Point after his foster father disowned him, right after his third book was published his brother died due to alcoholism, lost his first real publishing job due to being found drunk on the job by his boss, married his thirteen-year-old cousin (Virginia Clemm, often thought to be the inspiration behind <i>Annabel Lee</i>) only to watch her slowly die of tuberculosis at twenty-four, he began drinking even more heavily and thus acting even more erratically, his attempts to court a fellow poet were constantly being undercut by her mother, finally he returned to his hometown and took up with the past fiancé that left him for another man.<br><br>
I'm sure you knew all of this. I only wrote it to help drive the point home: loss was all he knew. He was an artist. Most artists are tortured in one way or another. An unoriginal thought, yes, but that does not make it any less true.<br><br>
Perhaps my history clouds things for me, perhaps it makes things clearer. I suppose I'll never know.<br><br>
A long story as short as I can make it (I'm not look for sympathy, I'm just stating the facts): I ended up in coma, near death, after my mother dumped my body in the parking lot of a local hospital in between a huge mass of cars. Knowing she was going to be in trouble (an understatement, I know) she killed herself before the cops got to our apartment. My father, shocked by what happened, had a heart attack just outside my room and died. I was nine. It'll be twenty-years tomorrow that I ended up in the hospital and Friday is the anniversary of my father's death.<br><br>
Death is a part of life, it's true. But more importantly <i>Annabel Lee</i> is one of FoxintheSnow's favorite poems, has been for a long time. She named her daughter after something she loves and wants to share it with her. The poem may not have a traditional "happy ending," but I'm betting Annabel's childhood does. Despite all that happened to me, I'm still living mine. I was raised by my (divorced) grandparents. They got a house and slowly worked at putting me back together again. When I say Mom and Dad, they're who I'm talking about. It's cliché, but if we couldn't feel loss, then we couldn't feel joy. It's how we know what makes us happy so that we can make healthy choices in our lives.<br><br><br>
(So, so sorry for the thread-jack. It's a hard week, although that's no excuse. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">)
 

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I can certainly empathise with your friend. I find the idea of hanging a poem about the death of a girl named Annabel on the wall of a girl named Annabel pretty disturbing.<br><br>
But the thing is, it disturbs me as an adult, and as a mother. When I was a kid, I would have loved it if my mom hung something like that on my wall - and if it creeped out my mom's friends, I would have loved it <b>even more</b>!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>FoxintheSnow</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15438303"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Ever since I read it in high school I have always adored Edgar Allen Poe's poem Annabel Lee (here it is in case you aren't familiar <a href="http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/annabel-lee/" target="_blank">http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/annabel-lee/</a>)<br><br>
I even named my dd Annabel. I hand wrote out the whole poem on pretty paper, framed it and hung it on her wall.<br><br>
Recently a friend came over, read it and was shocked that I would put such a "morbid" poem on my dd's wall. She said it didn't seem appropriate to have a poem about a woman who died on a child's wall. But I think the poem is beyond beautiful. Maybe my vision is clouded though because I love it. What do you think?</div>
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It is a very beautiful poem about love that transcends. Yes, it is dark, but it is not terribly morbid (though my DD gets a kick out of anything remotely morbid).
 

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I love Edgar Allan Poe and Annabel Lee is one of my favorite poems. I don't know that I'd put it in a young child's room, but I wouldn't necessarily think it was morbid if someone else did.
 
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