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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lately ds has been asking for books to be read over and over and over again. Last night, we were looking at one of his faves and instead of reading it to him, i paused at each new page and he recited what i had read to him the other 800 million times we'd read the book. Is this how reading begins?
 

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I heard a program on NPR that talked about theories on how to best teach reading. No one knew for certain which one was best. At the end of the program, all they could agree on was that if parents read to kids early and often, kids will read.<br><br>
They also said that when the kid starts reciting from the book, whether it is "read" or "memorized" does not matter. It's a step in the right direction.<br><br><br>
A month or two ago, we noticed that Dd was turning books right side up. She used to not care. She recognizes some letter blocks but I figured they are just like shapes - triangles, squares, As, and Bs, what's the difference. I was at the piano with her several weeks ago and I was doing the letters of the scale. The next day she looked at a book and said "ABC's." And we just learned that Dd can read her name. A package arrived for her 2nd birthday. She usually leaves the mail alone, but started tugging at the label on this one - with her name in big block letters. Later I pointed to her monogram on a blanket MIL sent, and asked what it said, and she said her name.<br><br>
Fascinating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That is fascinating, Curious. I'm sure that Boo's pretty much memorized things after having heard them so many times, but it's kind of neat. I kind of figured that even if he was just linking the dialogue with the pictures that he was learning something. It's cool that your dd recognizes her own name. =) That's a pretty useful skill, especially when presents are involved. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/pinktongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="raz"><br><br>
I read pretty early too, and i'm kind of on the fence on how i feel about boo learning so early. On one hand, if he's learning early it's going to be because he's ready. On the other hand, if he's already picking up reading skills, i'm worried about how other pple will label him, and all of that. We're already getting comments from pple who insinuate that we must be coaching him or something. Bleh. I had a lot of problems connecting with other kids when i was a child bc i was the 'smart' kid, and i dont want him to have to go thru that either.
 

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I would say yes, that is how reading starts.<br>
As for pushing a child.......I have found it is pretty hard to get a kid to do something they don't want to learn. If Boo is ready, Boo will pick it up on his own. IMO some kids just have a knack for reading, just like some walk early, talk early, go on the potty at 18 months or build huge lego towers at an early age.<br>
Ds read at a little over 3. It;s not something you can hide when your kid is reading the signs and labels outloud at the store. Just ignore those people who feel the need to comment....they are just jealous. He has no issues connecting with other kids, altho he does prefer the company of older children.<br>
Dd (2) can say the names of some chords on the guitar (I am learning and apparently so is she!). Like Curious said, to her it is most likely like anything else I label for her at this point. "that is a cloud, that is a letter A, this is a D chord" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
The coaching thing bugs me.....like you trained Boo to do something just to show him off. I always called it "stupid kid tricks" when I met someone who was like "go on honey! Show SereneTabbie how you can count to 10/sing twinkle twinkle/give a high 5/twirl in a circle!" Of course, I would never tell them I thought it was silly to teach your kid something just to put him/her on display <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"> And, I never taught my dog any of those silly tricks either (roll over, shake hands, etc) :LOL
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">IMO some kids just have a knack for reading, just like some walk early, talk early, go on the potty at 18 months or build huge lego towers at an early age.</td>
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I totally agree. DH and I are avid, avid readers (he's a writer, I'm a student - go figure!) as were our parents, so we already have a crammed bookshelf and reading is one of our favorite activities w/ DS. But mostly this is because <b>he</b> enjoys it so much.<br><br>
A HIGHLY verbal child, DS was already reciting several of his favorite books at 12 mos. Sandra Boynton's <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Moo, Baa, La La La</span> was the first. He picked it up by himself one day, sat down:<br><br>
First page, "MOO!"<br>
Second page, "BAA!"<br>
Third page, "LA LA LA!"<br>
Fourth page, "No no no!"<br><br>
If you've read the book, you know what I'm talking about! And of course he goes on and on with many others, as well (he's now 21 mos.)<br><br>
I, too, was labeled "smart" and it has caused some problems for me, so our tactic is to continue to encourage development and activities that our DS enjoys, but to try to ensure regular interaction with kids of all abilities and to <b>try</b> to minimize our discussions of "idiots," etc. Right now DS is at a daycare that includes an early intervention program for special needs kids. There is one special needs kid in his class, as well as another class-ful that his group plays with several times a day. I think it may make a big difference.<br><br>
At any rate, I think it's great that your Boo is on the reading path. It will be a source of enjoyment forever!<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 
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