Mothering Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone, I'm new to this forum, but not MDC. My daughter who is 10 months old is having severe communication delays as well as sensory issues. She rarely makes eye contact, and when she does it is brief. She is not making any sounds.. all she does is yell basically and goes "um" a lot. We just did a speech evaluation today and they are going to be working with her. I am also getting an evaluation through CDSA in NC and hopefully an occupational therapist can help me with the sensory issues. My daughter will not eat any soft foods. She eats baby foods just fine, and she loves cheerios, crackers.. anything hard, she devours... But when it comes to cheese, beans, peas, diced apples, carrots, etc.. she immediately spits them out and cries. Even if the carrots are mixed into mashed sweet potatoes, she will eat that and spit out the carrots and get upset. She also will not touch them.. She'll touch them maybe once or twice, but then gets very angry. Then she has trouble with loud sounds.. She startles a lot. Especially with coughing.. She'll start sobbing if someone starts coughing. She starts shaking at the vacuum cleaner and when we are going to close the trunk or car door, even if we prepare her, it still startles her.<br><br>
If you're still reading at this point, I am really thankful! I am just looking for someone to say, oh I've been through that. Not that I'd wish it on anyone.. I just wish I knew what was going on. I won't know whats officially going on until the eval. from CDSA on Dec. 12th.. But I just wanted to see if any of you could relate.. or if any of you saw this in your children at such a young age.<br><br>
We are thinking that it could be Sensory Integration Disorder because I have sensory issues, I haven't been officially diagnosed, and my nephew was just diagnosed with it.. So I know it is prevalent in my family.<br><br>
Also, another question, the speech therapist recommended the book "It takes Two to talk" Is this a good book? It is so expensive! I'm a single mother, and I will definitely buy it if it'll help.. But 50 dollars for a book makes me cringe a little.. that makes me feel so guilty saying that..<br><br>
Anyways, thank you so much for listening to me ramble! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
823 Posts
<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fgp%2Foffer-listing%2F0921145020%2Fref%3Ddp_olp_2%2F103-9937781-6621460" target="_blank">Amazon has it for $23</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you! I looked there earlier today and could only find 50 dollars + how weird.. I really appreciate it a lot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,094 Posts
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wave.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wave"> Welcome to the SN board!<br><br>
I don't have much info on the communication issues, but my dd has some similar sensory issues, which began somewhere around 6-9mos of age (I forget exactly). The sound of applause sent her over the edge and sudden, unexpected loud noises sent her into a fit of tears. She is actually doing much better with that now. She can tolerate these noises, as long as she is not overly tired, hungry or sick. She still hides her head in my shoulder, but she does not scream or cry anymore. Her sensory issues with food are the opposite of your dd's. Rebekah cannot stand anything hard or crunchy in her mouth. She immediately spits it out and gets mad. We were working with an occupational therapist through ECI but she left for another job and they haven't found a new one for us yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
Hey mama, welcome to the SN board<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I love all of the Hannen programs! I took the It Takes Two workshop YEARS ago for work and found the information in was fantastic. We are currently taking the More Than Words course which is geared more for kids on the spectrum or children with severe communication delays was well social/interaction challenges (my middle guy has autism) and I am LOVING it<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> I dont know if I would have gotten as much out of the books without the workshop/videos to go along with it, but the Hanned stuff is the mainstay of most SLP's up here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,378 Posts
Go to Amazon and print out the page where you find the book "It Takes Two To Talk". About midway on the page you'll find the ISBN number. Call your library (I can request ILLs on-line) and ask for this book through inter-library loan. It took my library 6 days to get it and I had it for 3 weeks.<br><br>
I didn't find it helpful enough to pay a lot of money for it.<br><br>
My child has apraxia and dysarthria. The apraxia makes it hard for signals from his brain to reach his mouth so he can move his muscles to talk. The dysarthria makes it hard for him to talk like stroke victims do. He also has hypotonia (low muscle tone) that affects his arms as well as his tongue.<br><br>
I can understand his approximations better now. He says "mama oh oh ee" for "mama cocoa please" and he points to the canister of hot cocoa. I use PECS from pyramidproducts.com. It's just a system of using laminated cards so he can tell me something or request something.<br><br>
10 mos is very young. At 30 mos I got my now 4 1/2 yo evaluated. My typical children learned to speak at 16, 19, and 24 mos.<br><br>
My youngest is a resistent eater. He eats few foods. In feeding therapy when he was asked to just touch a fresh banana slice he gagged. We are working on trying new foods.<br><br>
Best wishes on your upcoming evaluation.<br><br>
Sincerely,<br>
Debra, homeschooling mom of 4 ages 11(AS), 10, 8, and 4 1/2 (Apraxia, Dysarthria, PDD, OCD)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
832 Posts
I love the Hanen stuff too but I wouldn't buy this yet since your child is so young. Just keep an eye out for a used one.<br><br>
I personally preferred More Than Words for my nonverbal ASD boy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,794 Posts
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wave.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wave"> and welcome!!<br><br>
A lot of what your daughter is doing is stuff my sons did and do. Their symptoms stem from a genetic disorder (which leads to sensory issues and autism, in their case), so it's not the same---just similar.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2">s It's a long road, I'm sure, but getting therapies involved and starting work on it will lead to so many good things.<br><br>
As far as things needing to be crunchy...have you tried dehydrated veggies and fruit? <a href="http://www.justtomatoes.com/" target="_blank">This company, called Just Tomatoes</a>, makes great dehydrated fruit (with NO additives or artificial anything)...and it's CRUNCHY!!!!! Light, easy to bite, crunchy....like a chip or something. For crunchy sensory seekers, it's a great product. We buy it at our local organic co-op and we really like them.<br><br>
ETA: <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> strangely, the one veggie that isn't all that crunchy when they dry it are the carrots. They tend to be kinda chewy. So I'd avoid those, but the sweet corn, peas, bananas, strawberries, mango, raspberries, blueberries and some of the others are fantabulous!
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top