Mothering Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My babe is 5 weeks old. He's always been a bit yellow, but his bilirubin at a few days was not too high. He had an appointment with his pediatrician at 3ish weeks, and both the pedi and nurse thought he looked "not too yellow", so they didn't worry enough to test. He also eats, pees, poops just fine.<br><br>
But at 5 weeks, he STILL seems really yellow to me. Some days more than others. It goes up and down, it seems. I don't want to rush to the pediatrician because I don't want that dreadful light blanket that my first had... but we also do not really have sun here as it's horribly snowy and overcast.<br><br>
Would you worry or let it go? Anything else I could do to help? I may just be overreacting, but wanted to ask someone who may not just say, "call the doctor".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,324 Posts
DD had a yellowish tint for awhile after they determined her bilirubin levels were okay. She was born a tad early and was super yellow for a good while even after her levels went down. The dr said that's normal. But I'm pretty sure it was cleared up by the 5 week mark. Can you ask them just to check her levels? For peace of mind?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,887 Posts
I think I would want another check, along with a complete blood count to determine his most basic blood levels. My own baby had a prolonged jaundice which we ultimately discovered was a side effect of a condition she had which caused a great deal of red blood cells to be hemolyzed on an ongoing basis. (She's better now).<br><br>
Anyways it's just a 'just in case' precaution, but if I were you I'd be wanting a current set of bloodwork to see where his numbers are at.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,490 Posts
Found this on kellymom:<br><br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/newman/07jaundice.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/newman/07jaundice.html</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><b>So-called Breastmilk Jaundice</b><br>
There is a condition commonly called breastmilk jaundice. No one knows what the cause of breastmilk jaundice is. In order to make this diagnosis, the baby should be at least a week old, though interestingly, many of the babies with breastmilk jaundice also have had exaggerated physiologic jaundice. The baby should be gaining well, with breastfeeding alone, having lots of bowel movements, passing plentiful, clear urine and be generally well (handout #4 Is My Baby Getting Enough Milk?). In such a setting, the baby has what some call breastmilk jaundice, though, on occasion, infections of the urine or an under functioning of the baby's thyroid gland, as well as a few other even rarer illnesses may cause the same picture. Breastmilk jaundice peaks at 10-21 days, but may last for two or three months. Breastmilk jaundice is normal. Rarely, if ever, does breastfeeding need to be discontinued even for a short time. Only very occasionally is any treatment, such as phototherapy, necessary. There is not one bit of evidence that this jaundice causes any problem at all for the baby. Breastfeeding should not be discontinued "in order to make a diagnosis". If the baby is truly doing well on breast only, there is no reason, none, to stop breastfeeding or supplement with a lactation aid, for that matter. The notion that there is something wrong with the baby being jaundiced comes from the assumption that the formula feeding baby is the standard by which we should determine how the breastfed baby should be. This manner of thinking, almost universal amongst health professionals, truly turns logic upside down. Thus, the formula feeding baby is rarely jaundiced after the first week of life, and when he is, there is usually something wrong. Therefore, the baby with so-called breastmilk jaundice is a concern and "something must be done". However, in our experience, most exclusively breastfed babies who are perfectly healthy and gaining weight well are still jaundiced at five to six weeks of life and even later. The question, in fact, should be whether or not it is normal not to be jaundiced and is this absence of jaundice something we should worry about? Do not stop breastfeeding for “breastmilk” jaundice.</td>
</tr></table></div>
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top