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I was never too fond of letting my kids browse the internet unsupervised, I'm a little protective on the subject. Anyways, I just wanted to share this website with you. It's a safe search engine by which filters out any offensive or adult content. It also has a lot of educational fun content, my 6 year old loves it! KidzSearch
 

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It's a serious problem because in nowadays our children are victims of bad people who stay behind the internet. I have two girls and I'm very strict about the Internet because it's more dangerous so I control all what they have in phones and with who speak. Maybe some parents consider It's not correct but I spoke with other moms and one of them found a super platform Our Preschools and Daycares In Georgia » Kid City USA which prepares children to feel more confident when they enter kindergarten and elementary school and of course they learn and get used to be more independent. My girls are practicing this preschool and I am really thankful for the services.
 

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I 100% agree with being very strict about the media children are exposed to and the Internet in particular. I’ve been on sites like quora and there are 8 year olds asking strangers on the Internet for tips on how to starve themselves, hurt themselves, or even commit suicide. And people actually give them advice on how to do this. Children and teens can find all sorts of info and in a underdeveloped mind, it can be dangerous, even if an adult could see that info with no harm done. Things like dieting, bulking, dating, sex, porn (or less graphic things which have a similar innuendo), calorie counts in foods, how to self harm without getting caught, violent images...the list goes on, and this stuff is really easy to find. Teens can get around parental controls. Not to mention predators on the Internet, hoping to make contact with vulnerable children.

It may seem extreme by today’s standards, but I don’t actually believe in giving kids personal devices until age 18. No laptops, no tablets, no smart phones. I know a lot of school these days send children home with an laptop or tablet, but I’m more about the Waldor philosophy of avoiding that stuff in the learning environment. I don’t see computers as being beneficial to early education, and when kids grow older and can benefit from learning about computer technology (coding, editing, programming, web design, etc), they can do that on a desktop computer. When they’re old enough to actually need one (because they’re getting around on their own), they can have a phone that makes calls and texts, but no Internet access. I also think it’s a good idea for families to have a home phone, so that children can have the autonomy of calling their friends without having to borrow their parent’s phone. I remember being a teen with Internet access and no parental oversight, and it led to some very harmful outcomes. I also remember young children all bragging about their phones (they were 8/9) and it really amounting to a status symbol. I think it’s fine for kids to use the computer and Internet (that blocks obvious things like porn) and watch T.V., but I think those appliances should be in family rooms like the kitchen or living room, so that there’s accountability and some supervision.

This is my basic screen privileges by age:


under 4 years: no screens
4-6 years: pre-screen telly shows/channels, DVD's, & films on a case by case basis, unsupervised, in communal rooms; pre-screened online videos & computer games with full adult supervision (adult sitting at the computer with the child)
7-10 years: telly & films w/ permission, unsupervised, in communal rooms (no pre-screening unless recommended for older audience); desktop computer activities pre-screened w/ permission, unsupervised in communal rooms; personal computers with full adult supervision only (child should not handle device)
11-13 years: telly w/o permission in communal rooms; desktop computer w/ parental controls, no pre-screening, w/ permission, unsupervised in communal rooms; personal/portable devices w/ adult supervision, child may handle the device
14-17 years: telly & desktop w/o permission, unsupervised in communal rooms; personal computers, using parents' devices, with permission, w/o supervision, but with adult present in the room


In general for all family members:
-no screens in the bathroom or bedroom
-no screens during first hour after waking or last hour before sleeping
-no screens during meals
-one screen at a time
-no screens on public transportation or short car rides
-screens with friends must be enjoyed together (watching/playing something together)
-no screens during quiet time
-if screens are coming in the way of social time, active time, imaginative play time, homework, or chores, it must be eliminated for a time and then gradually reintroduced to avoid abusing it

I know this seems extreme, but I think it’s actually closer to what my generation used to do. I think screens and technology have their place, but they are definitely harming children. Kids these days have higher rates of mental illness, inactivity, poor muscle tone, obesity, less self control and patience, poor fine motor skills and small muscle development, poorer social skills, poorer sleep patterns, less imaginative skills, etc. This is all a direct result of screen abuse. Adults are suffering too, and many are addicted to screens.

I like to think of screens like alcohol: give an adult a drink two and it’s probably fine. Likely no horrible outcomes. Give a child the same amount and you’re risking poisoning, dependency/addiction, mental illness, and many other problems. A child’s body cannot handle what an adult’s can; a child’s mind cannot handle what an adult’s can, either.
 
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