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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks,<br><br>
Need some wisdom here. I just got some great kefir grains. The milk is culturing quickly. But, here's my question: We started our kefir journey drinking plain helios brand from the store. It was nice and thick. Is there any way to make my "home-grown" kefir thick like that? Would it hurt to add some yogurt? I HATE milk and can't drink the thin kefir without gagging.<br><br>
There was a good deal of whey in the batch that I strained this morning, but I had a hard time getting some of it into the strained kefir. Even with what I got, though, it was milky and not creamy or thick.<br><br>
I've been using 1% milk. Would a different milk help?<br><br>
Any wisdom, folks?<br><br>
Thanks!<br>
megin
 

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I definately tink going to whole milk is going to make your kefir creamier...and maybe just culture it longer? My kefir is usually really thick...hard to strain out the grains etc. Also maybe leaving it in the fridge for a day or so?<br><br>
Good Luck<br><br>
Tanya
 

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search second fermentation for better directions...it's been a while, but after I strained the grains, I let it ferment with a loose lid (tightening and shaking a few times) for another day
 

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It's very difficult to achieve the same thickness at home with kefir or yogurt as a commercial product. Commercial yogurt and kefir, even organic has additives that makes the product a lot thicker and smoother and keeps it from separating into curds and whey the way homemade yogurt and kefir do.<br><br>
You definitely want to start with whole milk. Lowfat milk is not as beneficial since most of the nutrients in milk is naturally found in the fat; commercial lowfat milk adds back the synthetic vitamins lost from skimming out the fat. The fat in the whole milk will make a thicker kefir.<br><br>
When you make the kefir, the top part will start to look curdy. When that happens, swish the jar around until it is mixed up again. Do that everytime you remember to or check it every few hours. After a few times swishing, you will notice that the milk is starting to look thicker and cling to the side. This is probably the earliest I would say the kefir is done. I like to let it go a bit longer. If the thick curdy parts are starting to really float and the bottom is starting to look like clear whey, then I say the kefir is well done. This is how I like it since I like it really tangy.<br><br>
When you are ready to strain the kefir, give it a good stir with a spoon or chopstick. Then strain it through a plastic or bamboo strainer with a not too fine mesh. If you are using too fine a mesh, you will strain out only the whey and much of the kefir solids will remain in your strainer.<br><br>
To make it thick and more drinkable, plop a banana and some berries or any other fruit you like into the kefir and blend with a hand blender or in a food processor or regular blender.<br><br>
Here are two of my favorite kefir shakes:<br><br>
About 2 cups kefir<br>
1 banana<br>
6 to 8 oz strawberries, blackberries, or mixed berries<br>
1/2 tbsp honey or other whole sweetener<br>
splash of vanilla<br>
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About 2 cups kefir<br>
1 large or two small mangos, peeled and pitted<br>
1/2 tbsp honey or other whole sweetener<br>
splash of vanilla
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all! I definitely have some different things to try here, especially a strainer with LARGER holes. Makes total sense.<br><br>
thanks,<br>
megin
 
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